LAFS.910.W.2.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 910
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
0500300: Executive Internship 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0500370: Voluntary Public Service (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
1700300: Research 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700310: Research 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700370: Critical Thinking and Study Skills (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700380: Career Research and Decision Making (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1000400: Intensive Language Arts (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1000420: Intensive Writing (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1001320: English Honors 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001350: English Honors 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001810: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002300: English 1 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002310: English 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1005350: Literature and the Arts 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1006300: Journalism 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1006310: Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1006331: Journalism 5 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1007300: Speech 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1007330: Debate 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1007340: Debate 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1009300: Writing 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1009320: Creative Writing 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1009330: Creative Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1700360: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Inquiry Skills (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001310: English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001340: English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7910111: Access English 1/2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
1001315: English 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001345: English 2 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002305: English 1 Through ESOL for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1002315: English 2 Through ESOL for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1006375: Social Media 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
7910115: Fundamental English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
1007305: Speech 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1400340: Peers as Partners in Learning (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
1700600: GEAR Up 1 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700610: GEAR Up 2 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1006305: Fundamentals of Journalism (Specifically in versions: 2021 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700305: Fundamentals of Research (Specifically in versions: 2021 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.910.W.2.AP.4a: Produce a clear, coherent, permanent product that is appropriate to the specific task (e.g., topic), purpose (e.g., to inform) or audience (e.g., reader).
LAFS.910.W.2.AP.4b: Produce a clear, coherent, permanent product that is appropriate to the specific task, purpose (e.g., to entertain) or audience.
LAFS.910.W.2.AP.4c: Produce a clear, coherent, permanent product that is appropriate to the specific task, purpose (e.g., to argue) or audience.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Wear Sunscreen: A Satirical Take on the Time-Honored Graduation Speech:

This close reading lesson focuses on Mary Schmich's comical commencement speech essay, "Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young." Students will take an in-depth analysis to discover her powerful satirical style, as well as the power of social nuances. Students will focus on academic vocabulary and answer high-level text-dependent questions as a guide for their comprehension of the essay, evaluating if her choice of words and wisdom remain valid, relative, and sufficient for the youth of today. Graphic organizers and worksheets, along with teacher keys, and a writing rubric have been provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing Irony: The Gift of the Magi--Lesson 3 of 3:

This lesson is the third in a series of three based on O. Henry's short story "The Gift of the Magi." The previous lessons provide instruction in using context clues to determine word meanings and in analyzing the significance of literary devices in a short story. In this final lesson, students will apply their knowledge of context clues from lesson one while also working to analyze irony across two texts, "The Gift of the Magi" and "The Shivering Beggar," a poem by Robert Graves.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Elements of Fiction: The Gift of the Magi--Lesson 2 of 3:

In this lesson, students will analyze the contribution of point of view, setting, allusion, plot, and irony to the development of theme in O. Henry's classic short story, "The Gift of the Magi." Students will write an extended paragraph explaining how one device contributes to the theme. This lesson is the second in a series of three based on "The Gift of the Magi." The previous lesson provides instruction in using context clues to determine word meaning.

Type: Lesson Plan

Swagger: Shakespeare versus Jay Z:

This lesson provides students the opportunity to explore how the word ‘swagger’ has transformed over centuries through the writings of poets such as Shakespeare and rappers such as Jay Z. Students will read an article from NPR titled  “What do Jay Z and Shakespeare Have in Common? Swagger” and thereafter will be asked to analyze vocabulary from the article, respond to text-dependent questions, and complete a summary of the term swagger analyzing its previous and present day definitions. A vocabulary graphic organizer, answer key, text-dependent questions handout and answer key, a learning scale, and a writing rubric have been included with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

An Argumentative Essay in Support of the Abridged Hero's Journey:

The hero's journey is an archetypal plot structure found in novels and epic poems, yet it can also be found in popular poetry and music. After students have read the novella Anthem, the poem "Invictus," and the song "Run Boy Run," they will craft an argument proving that the appearance of the hero's journey in shorter texts is just as developed and apparent as its appearance in longer texts by synthesizing and citing directly from three different sources. They will find and organize evidence, draft their arguments, and perform a peer review as they complete the writing process. This lesson is lesson two in a two-part series.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Surveillance Society – Is Privacy just an Illusion?:

"The line between private and public space is as porous as tissue paper." Students will explore issues of privacy through the TIME magazine article "The Surveillance Society" by David Von Drehle. This article will provide students with an opportunity to be up close and personal with delineating, evaluating, and explaining an author's claim. Students will read chunks of text while interacting with a graphic organizer to assist them in drawing conclusions and creating an original response to whether or not privacy has become an illusion due to our technological advances.

Type: Lesson Plan

Literary Elements in The Most Dangerous Game:

This lesson focuses on similes, metaphors, personification, irony, imagery and allusion in Richard Connell's short story, "The Most Dangerous Game." Students first create a "Silly Sheet" study aid for these literary devices, and then they engage in a "scavenger hunt" where they find examples of these devices in the story. Students then work in small groups to interpret the meanings of these devices within the context of the story. Finally, students will individually write an essay analyzing the effect that these devices have on the story as a whole. The "scavenger hunt" handout and answer key, two PowerPoints, and the directions for the essay with a planning sheet and rubric are included.

Type: Lesson Plan

Culture, Character, Color, and Doom: Close Reading Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily":

In this close reading lesson, students will read William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" one chunk at a time to examine elements of plot, culture, setting, and point of view that contribute to the mystery and suspense that lead to its dark, even terrifying, ending.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hubris: A Recurring Theme in Greek Mythology:

Students will analyze protagonist, antagonist, conflict, resolution, and hubris in three classic myths: "Odysseus and Polyphemus," "Athena and Arachne," and "Echo and Narcissus." They will write an essay explaining the message of each myth using examples from the myths and discuss the impact of the recurring theme of hubris on the ancient Greek audience.

Type: Lesson Plan

Privacy: A Matter of National Security?:

In this lesson, students will embark upon a journey of espionage and inquire how the rights of one can become a barrier for the greater good of a nation.

Students will read two informational texts about former NSA agent Edward Snowden. This close reading activity will require students to use textual support, reasoning and relevancy of the text, and analyze an author's claims to engage in discourse through Philosophical Chairs. Students will also synthesize the arguments, information, and claims within the text to write an essay proving that Snowden is either a hero or a traitor.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Biography Study: Using Role-Play to Explore the Lives of Authors:

Dramatizing life stories provides students with an engaging way to become more critical readers and researchers. In this lesson, students select American authors to research, create timelines, and write bio-poems. Then, they collaborate with other students in small groups to design and perform a 'panel of authors' presentation in which they role-play as their authors. The final project requires each student to synthesize information about his or her author in an essay. There are tons of additional links and resources included in this lesson plan!

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Plot Structure through Short Stories:

There's more to plot than identifying the series of events in a story. After viewing a PowerPoint presentation on plot structure, students will read and analyze the plots of three different short stories (as a class, in small groups, and individually). Then, they will use an online interactive plot structure tool to diagram the plot lines. This lesson also includes a writing assessment with rubric.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sold: Interview of a Trafficked Child - Final Lesson 3:

Lesson 3, "Interview of a Trafficked Child," gives students the opportunity to support their position on human trafficking by incorporating research and statistics into an article format.

Type: Lesson Plan

CollegeReview.com:

This is a model-eliciting activity where students have been asked by a new website, CollegeReview.com, to come up with a system to rank various colleges based on five categories; tuition cost, social life, athletics, education, city population and starting salary upon graduation.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: 1984:

Students often have difficulty envisioning and making sense of a story that is set in a markedly different time or circumstance than their own. This two-day activity introduces students to the dystopian society of 1984 by George Orwell. By analyzing Orwell's carefully chosen words, details, repetitions, and characterizations in these first few pages, students can construct a strong understanding of some of the key features of this society that will give them a solid framework for comprehending the rest of the novel. Doing this kind of close reading work also reinforces to students that authors do not randomly select the details they include in a text; they choose words carefully to create a mood or construct a particular image of a character or place in a reader's mind. The overriding question that students should be able to answer at the end of this exercise is: What can we understand about Winston Smith and the society he lives in based on the descriptive details George Orwell includes in the first few pages of 1984?

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Logos, Ethos, Pathos in "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro":

This lesson supports the implementation of the Florida Standards in the 9-10 classroom. It includes a copy of the text, a student activity handout, and links for background information and definitions of key terms. The purpose of this lesson is for students to read, understand, and analyze a speech through close reading and scaffolded learning tasks. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will write an essay that prompts them to use textual evidence to support their analysis of the claim Douglass makes in his speech "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro."

Type: Lesson Plan

Character Resumes:

From the resource:

After reading a play, students create a resume for one of the characters. Students first discuss what they know about resumes, then select a character from the play to focus on and jot down notes about that character. Next, they search the internet for historical background information. Students then explore the play again, looking for both direct and implied information about their characters and noting the location of supporting details. Finally, students draft resumes for their characters and search a job listing site for a job for which their character is qualified.

Type: Lesson Plan

Language of Letters: Analyzing the Change in Diction and Syntax from Civil War Times to the Present:

This lesson includes a close-reading and text-marking activity using two soldiers' letters, one from the Civil War and one from the Afghanistan War. Students will discover by looking as word choice and sentence structure how language styles have changed over time. After the reading lesson, students will write two RAFTs in the style of the times to show their understanding.

Type: Lesson Plan

Research Paper Adapted into a Speech:

In this lesson, students will take a previously written research paper and adapt it into a speech. A PowerPoint is included to help students with the adaption of their speech as they focus on purpose/task and audience. Information is also provided on how to organize their speech and how to deliver their speech (gestures, eye contact, posture, voice inflection, etc.). In preparation for writing and presenting their own speech, students will use a graphic organizer to analyze three different speeches in regards to content and delivery. A speech outline/flowchart is provided to help students brainstorm and organize their own speech. A speech rubric is provided for the summative assessment, along with a visual aid rubric.

Type: Lesson Plan

Annotation and Close Reading Passage Analysis: excerpt from Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury Part 3 of 3:

The goal of this lesson (lesson 3 in 3-part unit) is for students to be able to analyze and interpret the ways in which an author's style (use of literary devices) develops the author's purpose, tone, and theme found in complex and challenging texts. Close-reading skills culminate in a literary analysis essay in which students analyze how an author creates meaning through deliberate choices of language devices.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring Immigration and America (Part 3) through the Art of Norman Rockwell:

This lesson is the 3rd lesson of a unit on Immigration and America. In this lesson, students will analyze the famous Four Freedoms paintings by Norman Rockwell and make thematic connections to the previous works studied. The culminating activity is students' production of short essays in which they compare the works (both print and non-print) in terms of theme. They will need to write a strong thesis statement and support their ideas with textual evidence. Extensions to this unit would be for students to create multi-media presentations or artistic expressions of the topic of immigration today (compared to past eras) or how immigration has personally affected them and/or their family. This lesson also contains alternate activities and prompts so that it can stand alone if teachers choose not to use it in conjunction with the first two lessons in the series.

Type: Lesson Plan

Do You See What I See, Feel, Hear, Taste, and Smell?:

In this lesson, students will learn the importance of the senses to human beings and how appealing to the senses in writing is crucial to developing a connection between the reader and writer. Through vivid language, writers reach out to readers in order to share common human experiences and, even more importantly, the emotions that accompany them. Students view two videos and read a short article about the importance of the senses and practice using vivid descriptions themselves.

Type: Lesson Plan

Creating Suspense Lesson 2: Analyzing Literary Devices in "The Lottery":

In this lesson (part 2 of 2 in a unit), students will read and analyze literary devices in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery." Students will practice text-coding the story to note uses of characterization and references to tradition. Students will complete a handout where they will analyze how Jackson creates suspense through the use of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. Students will also compare/contrast a short (ten minute) film version of "The Lottery" to Jackson's story. Students will also participate in a Socratic Seminar covering topics such as Jackson's use of irony, tone, theme, and symbolism. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay comparing and contrasting Edgar Allan Poe's use of suspense with Jackson's, making a claim as to which author more successfully creates a suspenseful mood.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

“Greek Mythology Version 2.0: To Be or Not to Be an Epic Hero?”:

In this second lesson out of a three lesson unit, students will be able to continue analyzing the different characteristics that make a Greek Hero as they read books 1-10 of The Odyssey. On a more macro level, students will be able to analyze characteristics by looking at the ways in which characters are developed through the decisions they make and/or fail to make. The student handouts with all of the activities and links to the story are provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos (Part 3): Writing Persuasively:

In this lesson, students will identify and analyze rhetorical appeals in a speech and write a persuasive essay using multiple rhetorical appeals.

Type: Lesson Plan

Emily Dickinson: Poet Extraordinaire of Language, Time, and Space: Part 2:

In this lesson, the second in a three-lesson unit, students will explore Emily Dickinson's style by reading and analyzing a variety of her letters based on the historical context and audience of each. Students will use the letters, along with an Atlantic Monthly article, as sources for the summative assessment, a letter to the editor written in response to one or several of Dickinson's letters or topics.

Type: Lesson Plan

I Declare War: Part II:

I Declare War Part 2 is an extension of Part 1; therefore, the lessons must be done in sequential order. In Part 2, students will use the TPC(F)ASTT analysis chart to analyze "Dulce Et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen and write a comparative analysis of Owen's views on war versus Lincoln's views and examine the strategies they use to bring their viewpoints across. The poetry analysis of "Dulce Et Decorum Est" can be used for pre-AP preparation or to introduce AP Literature students to literary analysis at the beginning of the year before they attempt more complex poems.

Type: Lesson Plan

I Declare War: Part III:

In this lesson (the third in a three-lesson unit), students will analyze an excerpt from Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried. Working collaboratively and independently, students will explore the diction, images, details, language and syntax of the text. The summative assessment requires students to write an essay analyzing how the author uses language and literary techniques to convey the experience of the soldiers in the Vietnam War. Supporting handouts and materials are provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

Slaves Come to America:

This lesson introduces students to the history of how Africans were transported from their native countries (including the conditions they had to endure) to the United States and then forced to work as slaves on southern plantations. It examines the daily life of a slave in North Carolina and includes other informational texts about slavery and the slave trade, as well as a PowerPoint presentation, and links to two short videos. The summative assessment requires students to write an explanatory essay showcasing what they have learned and using evidence from the print texts and videos for support.

Type: Lesson Plan

Community Energy Wars:

Students will discuss the costs and benefits of a variety of energy projects in a local area.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

From Aesop to Steinbeck--Lesson 2: TIQA Writing, Supporting, and Proving Theme Statements:

The overarching goal of this series of three lessons is for ninth-grade students to be able to read works of literature, write their own theme statements and provide text-based supporting details and thorough analysis proving their theme statements. Lesson One includes instruction and practice with writing theme statements and including primary support details with a series of three texts from Aesop's Fables. *Lesson two presents students with a longer and more challenging children's story titled One. Students will draft their own theme statements and support and analyze the text using a literary analysis paragraph structure titled TIQA*. Finally, lesson three has students returning to Aesop's Fables and writing a TIQA paragraph, a longer literary analysis paragraph supported by not only textual evidence or quotes, but also strong literary analysis. Through collaborative discussions and repeated reading, responding, writing and analyzing, students will learn to consistently craft correct theme statements and support them with relevant textual details and analysis.

*The bolded section is relevant only to this lesson, which is the 2nd in a series of 3.

Type: Lesson Plan

Creating Brave New Voices Amongst Students:

This is the first lesson in a unit of three lessons focusing on spoken word poetry, as presented on the Brave New Voices Web site. In this lesson, students will read, view, and analyze several poems in print and on video; use poetic devices identified in the read and viewed texts; write original poems based on their own lives; and present their original poems to the class using appropriate intonation, inflection, and fluency. At the end of the unit of study, students will write an analytical paragraph evaluating Brave New Voices poems.

Type: Lesson Plan

Marvel Rainforest:

Students will examine how to manage a rainforest while maintaining the living standards of a community.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

I Feel Inside Out:

The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with an opportunity to analyze a character, in particular, one who suffers from a mental illness. The selected text is Terry Truman"s Inside Out (710L) in which the main character, Zach, suffers from schizophrenia. However, other suggested titles are provided and would suffice for this lesson. Specifically, students will be required to identify what the main character thinks, says, and does in order to support a multi-paragraph character analysis that incorporates textual evidence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Wreck it Ralph -- Epic Hero? A Fun Multimedia Introduction to Homer's Odyssey:

In this introduction to Homer's The Odyssey, students will work with peers and technology to determine if the main character of Wreck it Ralph is an epic hero. Through this multimedia study, students will evaluate the characteristics of an epic hero through a webquest, film, and final paper. In the end, students will be prepared to apply this knowledge to Homer's epic poem.

Type: Lesson Plan

Death: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Lesson Three of Three, Poems about Death):

In this lesson, students will compare and contrast the tone and theme of two poems about death. Students will annotate text, complete a directed note taking organizer and essay organizer, and will write a compare/contrast essay.

Type: Lesson Plan

An Introduction with Death: A Close Reading of the Prologue from The Book Thief by Markus Zusak:

In this lesson, students will conduct several close readings of an excerpt from the prologue of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. For the first close reading, students will focus on identifying the narrator and select academic vocabulary. In the second reading, students will analyze different examples of figurative language within the prologue. They will focus on how the word choices impact the tone of the novel and what effect it has on the reader. During the final close reading, students will explore the persona of the narrator. The summative assessment is a two-paragraph writing assignment which will require students to discuss how Zusak's use of figurative language enhances the story. Students will also examine how the structure of the text sets the tone for the rest of the novel.

Type: Lesson Plan

Elie’s Life through Many Mediums:

In this lesson, students will analyze and interpret videos and speeches, both in multimedia and print formats, about and from Holocaust survivor, author, and professor Elie Wiesel. Students will use an MRIP Strategy (Mode, Relationship, Imagery, Purpose) as an analysis tool. Students will use the MRIP Strategy to help them develop a paragraph using an A-E-C format (Assertion-Evidence-Commentary) for each of the different accounts examined in the lesson. In the summative assessment, students will use their notes to write an argumentative essay that requires them to make a claim as to what central ideas are evidenced across the different accounts of Elie Wiesel examined throughout the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Emily Dickinson: Poet Extraordinaire of Language, Time, and Space Part 3:

In this lesson, students will work in small groups to analyze the multiple perspectives represented in Emily Dickinson's writing. They will generate research and investigate primary and secondary documents on movements that influenced Dickinson. Through this research they will create a reference kit - a collection of materials that are representative of the period. They will then analyze similar poetry from other like-minded writers before moving on to Emily Dickinson, using the movements they researched as "lenses" through which to view the poems. The culminating activity includes a thorough analysis of Dickinson's poem "I Dwell in Possibility" and a resulting essay.

Type: Lesson Plan

From Animal Farm to Fables – Elements of a Fable Writing Assignment:

The purpose of this lesson is to provide a culminating assignment after reading the classic novel Animal Farm by George Orwell (1370 Lexile). Shortly after finishing the novel, students will read famous fables and identify how each, including the novel Animal Farm, meet the requirements. Finally, the students will then apply these elements by writing their own fables that include all of the necessary characteristics. This will not only help students build their own creativity, but it will allow application of the lesson and develop writing skills further.

Type: Lesson Plan

Poetry Reading and Interpretation Through Extensive Modeling:

Through the use of extensive modeling with John Berryman's "Sole Watchman," students will understand the steps involved in the analysis and interpretation in poetry. The teacher will model how to summarize and analyze the poem, construct a thesis, and develop an essay. Students will review and discuss a sample essay complete with comments that highlight strong writing decisions. After reading and interpreting Berryman's "The Ball Poem," students will construct a 3-4 page essay on this poem.

Type: Lesson Plan

What You Say: Language Context Matters:

In this lesson students will analyze three texts (Amy Tan's "Mother Tongue," Richard Rodriguez's "Se Habla Espanol," and Zora Neale Hurston's "How it Feels to be Colored Me") looking at language, tone, and style. Students will be scaffolded through use of graphic organizers and a Socratic Seminar to culminate in an essay about tone.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part four of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and important details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part three of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Project

Understanding Julius Caesar Through Diaries:

Understanding Julius Caesar Through Diaries allows students to read and understand Shakespeare's Julius Caesar by getting involved in an on-going project that promotes engagement throughout the play. Instead of simply reading the work, students become actively involved with plot and characterization. At the beginning of the unit, each student chooses a character that they want to be throughout the duration of the play. At the end of each act students complete diary entries for this character, so in addition to documenting the major action in the play, they also report it from the viewpoint of one specific character.

Type: Project

Teaching Ideas

Are People Free?: Using a Discussion Web to Engage in Meaningful Collaboration:

This teaching idea addresses the pros and cons of discussion by analyzing the concept of utopia in a satire. Students collaborate in small groups to create a Discussion Web that addresses the question, "Are people equal?" Students engage in meaningful discussions analyzing all sides of their initial response, form a consensus, and present it to the class. Students then read "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. and use supporting details to complete another Discussion Web that examines whether or not the people in the story are equal. Web-based graphic organizers, assessments, and extension activities are included.

Type: Teaching Idea

Choosing the Best Verb: An Active and Passive Voice Minilesson:

This mini-lesson explores verb choice in formal writing using a variety of online resources. Students draw conclusions about verb usage while working with their peers, using graphic organizers, checking for active and passive voice, and making necessary revisions. A lot of great web resources are provided in this teaching idea!

Type: Teaching Idea

Literary Pilgrimages: Exploring the Role of Place in Writers’ Lives and Works:

How do places and experiences affect writers' lives and works? Is where a writer comes from relevant to reading their work? In this lesson, students consider the power of place in their own lives, research the life of a writer, and develop travel brochures and annotated maps representing the significance of geography in a writer's life.

Type: Teaching Idea

Songs as a Way to Analyze Text, Words and Main Idea:

Students pretend that they have just landed a job with a local music magazine, and their first assignment is to write a short article in which they interpret the lyrics of a popular song.

Type: Teaching Idea

Finding Common Ground: Using Logical, Audience-Specific Arguments:

From the resource:
"When students write argumentative or persuasive essays, they often ignore the viewpoints of their opponents, the potential readers of their essays. In this mini-lesson, students respond to a hypothetical situation by writing about their position on the subject. After sharing their thoughts with the class, students consider the opposite point of view and write about arguments for that position. They then compare their position with that of their potential audience, looking for areas of overlap. They then revise their arguments, with the audience's point of view and areas of commonality in mind. Examining the opposing view allows students to better decide how to counter their opponent logically, perhaps finding common ground from which their arguments might grow. Thus, the activity becomes a lesson not only in choosing arguments but also in anticipating audience reaction and adapting to it."

Type: Teaching Idea

Spend a Day in My Shoes: Exploring the Role of Perspective in Narrative:

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus explains to Scout that "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (36). Make this advice more literal by inviting students to imagine spending a day in someone else's shoes in this writing activity. Students examine a variety of shoes and envision what the owner would look like, such as their appearance, actions, etc. They then write a narrative, telling the story of a day in the shoe owner's life. While this lesson plan uses the quotation from To Kill a Mockingbird as a springboard and ties nicely to discussions of the novel, it can be completed even if students are not currently reading the book.

Type: Teaching Idea

Tutorials

Effective Writing: Organization :

This activity from the Online Tutorial for Effective Writing from Northern Illinois University provides you with a pre-test to identify any weaknesses in understanding how to organize and revise your writing. After reviewing the mini-lesson on the missed items, you will be presented with additional interactive quizzes for each error type. The arrows at the bottom of each mini-lesson will lead you to these quizzes for extra practice and support.

Type: Tutorial

Guide to Grammar and Writing: Principles of Composition:

This is a comprehensive guide that can help students with writing. This resource includes materials that will help students write in different formats, including personal essays, cause/effect papers, essays about literature, and research papers. There are materials that will help students with different aspects of the writing process, including how to develop an introduction or conclusion, how to write a thesis statement, and how to effectively use transitions.

Type: Tutorial

Unit/Lesson Sequences

Sample English 2 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP:

This sample English II CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the English II course. This CMAP is divided into 14 English Language Arts units and includes every standard from Florida's official course description for English II. The units and standards are customizable, and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, class notes, homework sheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes a row that automatically filters and displays e-learning Original Student Tutorials that are aligned to the standards and available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample English II CMAP, its features, and its customizability by watching this video:

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please .

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

An Exploration of Romanticism Through Art and Poetry :

Students use art and poetry to explore and understand the major historical, societal, and literary characteristics of the Romantic period in eight high-interest, collaborative lessons. After reviewing paintings from the Romantic Period and using William Wordsworth's poetry, students write an essay showing their understanding of Romanticism.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Challenging the Human Spirit:

Students select a theme-related essay topic from Night, by Elie Wiesel, or The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, and develop an essay that relates the theme to modern day personal experiences. The essay follows a preset rubric.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

A Biography Study: Using Role Play to Explore Authors' Lives:

Dramatizing life stories provides students with an engaging way to become more critical readers and researchers. In this lesson, students select American authors to research, create timelines and biopoems, and then collaborate in teams to design and perform a panel presentation in which they role-play as their authors. The final project requires each student to synthesize information about his or her author in an essay.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

CollegeReview.com:

This is a model-eliciting activity where students have been asked by a new website, CollegeReview.com, to come up with a system to rank various colleges based on five categories; tuition cost, social life, athletics, education, city population and starting salary upon graduation.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Community Energy Wars:

Students will discuss the costs and benefits of a variety of energy projects in a local area.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Marvel Rainforest:

Students will examine how to manage a rainforest while maintaining the living standards of a community.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and important details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part three of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part four of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part four of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and important details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part three of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

Effective Writing: Organization :

This activity from the Online Tutorial for Effective Writing from Northern Illinois University provides you with a pre-test to identify any weaknesses in understanding how to organize and revise your writing. After reviewing the mini-lesson on the missed items, you will be presented with additional interactive quizzes for each error type. The arrows at the bottom of each mini-lesson will lead you to these quizzes for extra practice and support.

Type: Tutorial

Guide to Grammar and Writing: Principles of Composition:

This is a comprehensive guide that can help students with writing. This resource includes materials that will help students write in different formats, including personal essays, cause/effect papers, essays about literature, and research papers. There are materials that will help students with different aspects of the writing process, including how to develop an introduction or conclusion, how to write a thesis statement, and how to effectively use transitions.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.