SC.912.N.1.3

Recognize that the strength or usefulness of a scientific claim is evaluated through scientific argumentation, which depends on  critical and logical thinking, and the active consideration of alternative scientific explanations to explain the data presented.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 912
Body of Knowledge: Nature of Science
Idea: Level 1: Recall
Standard: The Practice of Science -

A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation.

B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of "the scientific method."

C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.

D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Content Complexity Rating: Level 1: Recall - More Information
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

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2000320: Biology 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
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3027020: Biotechnology 2 (Specifically in versions: 2015 and beyond (current))
2003360: Chemistry 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2001320: Earth/Space Science Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000380: Ecology (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
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Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.912.N.1.In.2: Describe the processes used in scientific investigations, including posing a research question, forming a hypothesis, reviewing what is known, collecting evidence, evaluating results, and reaching conclusions.
SC.912.N.1.Su.2: Identify the basic process used in scientific investigations, including questioning, observing, recording, determining, and sharing results.
SC.912.N.1.Pa.2: Recognize a process used in science to solve problems, such as observing, following procedures, and recognizing results.

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