Standard 3: Analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in response to the Industrial Revolution.

General Information
Number: SS.912.A.3
Title: Analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in response to the Industrial Revolution.
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: American History

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Independent

SS.912.A.3.In.a
Identify responses to economic challenges faced by farmers, such as shifting from hand labor to machine farming, the creation of colleges to support agricultural development, and increasing the use of commercial agriculture.
SS.912.A.3.In.b
Identify economic developments in the second Industrial Revolution, such as mass production of consumer goods, including transportation, food and drink, clothing, and entertainment (cinema, radio, the gramophone).
SS.912.A.3.In.c
Identify technological developments and inventions in the Industrial Revolutions in the United States.
SS.912.A.3.In.d
Identify how developments in industry affected the United States economy, such as railroads, forms of communication, and corporations.
SS.912.A.3.In.e
Identify a significant inventor of the Industrial Revolution, including an African American or a woman.
SS.912.A.3.In.f
Identify changes that occurred as the United States shifted from an agrarian to an industrial society, such as laissez-faire policies and government regulations of food and drugs.
SS.912.A.3.In.g
Identify similarities in the way European immigrants in the east and Asian immigrants in the west were treated, such as discrimination in housing and employment.
SS.912.A.3.In.h
Identify the importance of social change and reform, such as settlement houses and churches that helped the poor during the early 1900s.
SS.912.A.3.In.i
Identify a cause and consequence of the labor movement in the late 1800s and early 1900s, such as the need to improve working conditions and the resulting child labor laws and work regulations.
SS.912.A.3.In.j
Identify major differences in economic systems, such as capitalism and communism.
SS.912.A.3.In.k
Identify ways powerful groups (political machines) in United States cities controlled the government, such as having enough votes to maintain control of the city and giving jobs or contracts only to people who supported them.
SS.912.A.3.In.l
Identify ways organizations and people have shaped public policy and corrected injustices in American life, such as the NAACP, the YMCA, Theodore Roosevelt, and Booker T. Washington.
SS.912.A.3.In.m
Identify key events and people in Florida history related to United States history, such as the railroad industry, the cattle industry, and the influence of immigrants.

Supported

SS.912.A.3.Su.a
Recognize responses to economic challenges faced by farmers, such as shifting from hand labor to machine farming, the creation of colleges to support agricultural development, and increasing the use of commercial agriculture.
SS.912.A.3.Su.b
Recognize that mass production of transportation, food, and clothing was developed during the second Industrial Revolution.
SS.912.A.3.Su.c
Recognize technological developments and inventions in the Industrial Revolutions in the United States.
SS.912.A.3.Su.d
Recognize how a development in industry affected the United States economy, such as railroads or forms of communication.
SS.912.A.3.Su.e
Recognize a significant inventor of the Industrial Revolution, including an African American or a woman.
SS.912.A.3.Su.f
Recognize changes that occurred as the United States shifted from an agrarian to an industrial society, such as laissez-faire policies and government regulations of food and drugs.
SS.912.A.3.Su.g
Recognize similarities in the way European immigrants in the east and Asian immigrants in the west were treated, such as discrimination in housing and employment.
SS.912.A.3.Su.h
Recognize the importance of social change and reform, such as settlement houses and churches that helped the poor during the early 1900s.
SS.912.A.3.Su.i
Recognize a cause and consequence of the labor movement in the late 1800s and early 1900s, such as the need to improve working conditions and the resulting child labor laws and work regulations.
SS.912.A.3.Su.j
Recognize an example of an economic system, such as capitalism.
SS.912.A.3.Su.k
Recognize that powerful groups in United States cities controlled the government and gave favors to people who supported them.
SS.912.A.3.Su.l
Recognize a way an organization or person has shaped public policy and corrected injustices in American life, such as the NAACP, the YMCA, Theodore Roosevelt, or Booker T. Washington.
SS.912.A.3.Su.m
Recognize a key event or person in Florida history related to United States history, such as the railroad industry, the cattle industry, or the influence of immigrants.

Participatory

SS.912.A.3.Pa.a
Recognize employment options in America.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.b
Recognize goods that are manufactured, such as clothing.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.c
Recognize that inventions changed life in the United States.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.d
Recognize transportation and communication systems.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.e
Recognize that inventions help people.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.f
Recognize that government can control business.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.g
Recognize the social issue of inequality.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.h
Recognize types of assistance for personal and social needs.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.i
Recognize that workers have rights.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.j
Recognize that people buy and sell goods and services.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.k
Recognize that powerful groups have a strong influence on government.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.l
Recognize an organization in the community that helps people.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.m
Recognize a key event or person in Florida history.

Related Resources

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Assessments

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Quiz: The Gilded Age :

Test your knowledge of the Gilded Age with this 10-question multiple choice quiz!

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Lesson Plans

The Cigar Industry Changes Florida: Cigarmakers’ Union Dispute in Tampa 1938-39:

L.M. Bryan's "Cigarmakers' Union Dispute" is an example of the short histories and stories written by authors working for the Florida Federal Writers' Project, a branch of the Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration) during the Great Depression. The state WPA office sent field workers into communities around the state to make observations, interview locals, and write up their findings in short passages that could be used for reference purposes. In this lesson students will analyze a primary source document to learn about the Cigarmakers' Union Dispute in Tampa 1938-39.

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Farming in the Gilded Age: A Simulation:

This video is about a simulation created by a teacher to show the hardships of "gambling" in the world of farming, especially in a past, less civilized time. The students were given 2000 and had to put 500 aside for various expenses. They were then given a list of 11 objects (crops and livestock) that they could chose from to purchase with the remaining 1500. The catch is, they only have a certain amount of space to use, and must plan which items will be more efficient in a set area. To simulate the purchasing of the crops and livestock, the teacher cut out squares with each item on it. He then had each group come up to spend their money on what they found fit for their particular group. After each group chose their ratios of crops and livestock, there was then a simulated growing season that had problems with certain crops and benefits of others. They then repeat the process for the following year with a different scenario for the growing season. At the end of the simulation, the teacher acted as if he was the banker that loaned the 2000 in the beginning. This is where it comes full circle to show why farming was so difficult in the past, and how it declined due to poor weather and the lack of the ability to pay off loans given to start farming in the first place.

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Comparing and Contrasting Robber Barons with Modern Entrepreneurs:

This lesson will compare robber barons from the Gilded Age/Industrialization Period with prominent business people of the last few decades. Students will identify characteristics of robber barons and determine if current business people would be considered robber barons. The students will complete this by organizing information into the Robber Baron t-chart and responding to guiding questions.

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Reading Like a Historian: Japanese Internment:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why were Japanese-Americans interned during World War II? The teacher first distributes a timeline, which the class reviews together. Students then view a government-made newsreel from 1942 explaining the rationale for internment. This is followed by 4 more documents, including the "Munson Report," an excerpt from the Supreme Court's decision in U.S. v Korematsu, and the 1983 report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. For each, students answer guiding questions and formulate a hypothesis: according to the document, why was internment necessary? A final class discussion has students determine which document(s) best explain what occurred.

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Reading Like a Historian: Albert Parsons SAC:

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Reading Like a Historian: Chinese Immigration and Exclusion:

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Reading Like a Historian: Homestead Strike:

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Reading Like a Historian: Jacob Riis and Immigrants:

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Reading Like a Historian: Japanese Segregation in San Francisco:

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Reading Like a Historian: Political Bosses:

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Reading Like a Historian: Populism and the Election of 1896:

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Reading Like a Historian: Progressive Social Reformers SAC:

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Reading Like a Historian: Pullman Strike :

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: How did Chicago newspapers cover the Pullman strike? The teacher begins by placing the Pullman strike in the context of other labor strikes and using a PowerPoint to convey basic information. Students are then divided into 4 groups, and each is given a different set of articles-1 each from the Chicago Times and Chicago Tribune-and told to use close reading strategies to figure out which paper was biased against the strikers and which favored them. Finally, each group chooses a representative to present to the entire class how that group arrived at its conclusion.

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Reading Like a Historian: The 1898 North Carolina Election:

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Original Student Tutorials

Progressivism After Roosevelt: Taft and Wilson, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the Progressive Era and two presidents who advanced progressive policies: William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson.  You'll also learn about the 1912 Election!  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Progressivism After Roosevelt: Taft and Wilson, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the Progressive Era and two presidents who advanced progressive policies: William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson. You'll also learn about the 1912 Election!

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold, progressive agenda that transformed America and the presidency.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn in detail about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold, progressive agenda that transformed America and the presidency.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, you'll analyze the Pullman Strike of 1894, a dramatic event in the American labor movement.  In Part 1, you'll focus on the history of the strike.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literary skills while learning more about the same event.  

Click HERE to open Part 1. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, you'll analyze the Pullman Strike of 1894, a dramatic event in the American labor movement.  In Part 1, you'll focus on the history of the strike.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literacy skills while learning more about the same event.

Click HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Innovation: Inventors of the Industrial Revolution:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll identify some of the key inventors of the Industrial Revolution, describe their inventions, and explain their significance. Most of the inventors you’ll learn about come from the Second Industrial Revolution--often known as the “Technological Revolution,” a time when American inventors created a host of new devices across a range of industries that increased efficiency and production, enhanced safety, furthered communication, and made the day-to-day lives of Americans a little easier.

Check out the related tutorial: Captains of Industry: The Second Industrial Revolution

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island.  You'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S., and you'll compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Captains of Industry: The Second Industrial Revolution:

In this interactive tutorial, learn some of the differences between the First and Second Industrial Revolutions, as well as key developments that drove the Second Industrial Revolution. You'll also learn about some of the leaders of industry during this era, including John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and J.P. Morgan, and examine how their development of major industries and business practices affected America’s economy during the Second Industrial Revolution.

Check out this related tutorial:  The Power of Innovation: Inventors of the Industrial Revolution.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Populist Revolt:

In this interactive tutorial, discover the Populist movement of the 1890s, which channeled the frustrations of American farmers into a new political party: The People's Party.  You'll also learn about the gold vs. silver debate that angered so many Populists, and you'll learn about the legacy of Populism in U.S. History.  

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Presentation/Slideshow

Reading Like a Historian: Background on Women’s Suffrage:

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Teaching Idea

Close Reading Exemplar: The Gospel of Wealth:

The goal of this two to three day exemplar from Student Achievement Partner web resources is to give students the opportunity to use effective reading and writing habits to make meaning out of complex text. By closely reading and re-reading the The Gospel of Wealth, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will identify the ways Andrew Carnegie proposes his philosophy for the distribution of wealth and the responsibility of philanthropy. When combined with writing about the passage, students will discover how much they can learn from engaging with a text in the form of a close reading.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resources

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Swift and Co. v. U.S. (1905):

Learn more about the 1905 landmark Supreme Court decision Swift and Co. v. U.S. In this case, the Court considered issues of trusts, business practices, regulations, monopolies, and capitalism in the Gilded Age.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: United States v. E.C. Knight (1895):

Learn more about the 1895 landmark Supreme Court decision U.S. v. E.C. Knight. In this case, the Court considered issues of trusts, business practices, regulations, monopolies, and capitalism in the Gilded Age.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Lochner v. New York (1905):

Learn more about the 1906 landmark Supreme Court decision Lochner v. New York. In this case, the Supreme Court established an important precedent that would last for decades when it struck down a labor law setting maximum working hours.

Type: Text Resource

How the Ford Motor Company Won a Battle and Lost Ground:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

This article relates the infamous incident of UAW leaders beaten savagely by Ford "security" forces in 1937. Although Ford spokesmen tried to blame union members for the violence, photos taken at the scene proved otherwise, leading to Ford's eventual capitulation to the UAW.

Type: Text Resource

Who Stole Helen Keller?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

This essay is a reevaluation of the life and reputation of Helen Keller, especially as it is commonly (mis)represented in textbooks and biographies for young readers. The author argues that Keller should be remembered for far more than being courageous, as she was also a "defiant rebel" and a radical.

Type: Text Resource

Wayne B. Wheeler: The Man Who Turned Off the Taps:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 11th-12th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class. The author, in an excerpt from his book Last Call, profiles Wayne Wheeler, once the leading "dry" activist in the struggle for the prohibition of alcohol in the U.S.

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Tutorials

U.S. History Overview: Reconstruction to the Great Depression:

Learn about key events in American history from the Reconstruction Era to the start of the Great Depression in this tutorial video provided by Khan Academy. The video touches on the Reconstruction Amendments, Jim Crow laws, the Coinage Act and the Panic of 1873, the Spanish-American War, World War I, and the 18th and 19th Amendments.

Type: Tutorial

Communism:

In this tutorial video brought to you by Khan Academy, you'll learn about the economic system called communism. This video explores the origins and history of communism and explains its connections to authoritarian forms of government.

Type: Tutorial

The Gilded Age: Part 2:

Learn about the Second Industrial Revolution and the expansion of railroads across America, new inventions like the elevator and telephone, and the rise of captains of industry like Andrew Carnegie in a short video by Khan Academy. Helpful graphics illustrate the content. Enjoy this journey back to the Gilded Age!

Type: Tutorial

The Gilded Age: Part 1:

Receive an introduction to the Gilded Age in this short video provided by Khan Academy. The Gilded Age, which fell between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the Progressive era, was a time of intense industrialization that saw the rise of captains of industry like John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie. Enjoy this quick trip through American history!

Type: Tutorial

Majority Rules: Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918):

Learn the historical context for a landmark Supreme Court decision, Hammer v. Dagenhart, in this short interactive tutorial. This case dealt with child labor in the early 20th century. You'll have a chance to evaluate the case on your terms before seeing how the justices actually ruled. Enjoy!

Type: Tutorial

Theodore Roosevelt & the United Mine Strike:

In this short video, learn about how President Theodore Roosevelt mediated a labor dispute, the Coal Strike of 1902, and how critics charged him with violating the Constitution.

Type: Tutorial

Trust Busting: Theodore Roosevelt:

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Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: William Howard Taft:

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Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Woodrow Wilson:

View this brief, funny video about the 28th President, Woodrow Wilson, commander-in-chief during World War I and its aftermath!

Type: Tutorial

Whose Land is This?:

Learn about America's history in this interactive tutorial. This webisode from PBS's History: A Freedom of Us provides detailed informational texts, primary source documents that include photographs, and online quizzes to help you explore aspects of this complex time in American history. You'll learn about the 1862 Homestead Act, the rise of immigration, different aspects of the immigrant experience, the expansion of the American West, and the violent conflicts that resulted in the deaths of Native Americans and the removal and relocation of different tribes onto reservations.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Theodore Roosevelt:

View a brief, funny video about our 26th President, Theodore Roosevelt, the progressive, trustbuster, and canal builder!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Progressive Presidents:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era. You'll specifically look at the domestic and foreign policies of 3 presidents: Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, and Woodrow Wilson, all of whom had progressive ideas about how government should be operated. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S History: The Industrial Economy:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind tour of America during the Industrial Revolution. After the Civil War, many changes in technology and ideas gave rise to a new industrialism. You'll learn about industry leaders of the time, such as Vanderbilt, Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Morgan. Enjoy this "crash course" review about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S History: Westward Expansion:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the period of Westward Expansion when white settlers moved west - often at the expense of the Native Americans who lived there. Many Americans who traveled westward at this time were in search of economic stability and property. Enjoy this "crash course" review of U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Immigrant Cities:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the migration patterns and influx of immigrants to our nation during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, along with the resultant growth of cities. These trends impacted the labor movement, workforce, and politics of this era. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Gilded Age Politics:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the Gilded Age, a period in American history where "politics were marked by a number of phenomenons, most of them having to do with corruption." These events led to populism and eventually to new legislation that regulated government and political corruption. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Progressive Era:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era in American history. During this time, people were attempting to solve governmental and societal issues, all while trying to better implement equality for all. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Progressivism After Roosevelt: Taft and Wilson, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the Progressive Era and two presidents who advanced progressive policies: William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson.  You'll also learn about the 1912 Election!  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Progressivism After Roosevelt: Taft and Wilson, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the Progressive Era and two presidents who advanced progressive policies: William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson. You'll also learn about the 1912 Election!

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold, progressive agenda that transformed America and the presidency.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Progressive Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn in detail about the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.  "TR," as he was known, pursued a bold, progressive agenda that transformed America and the presidency.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, you'll analyze the Pullman Strike of 1894, a dramatic event in the American labor movement.  In Part 1, you'll focus on the history of the strike.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literary skills while learning more about the same event.  

Click HERE to open Part 1. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, you'll analyze the Pullman Strike of 1894, a dramatic event in the American labor movement.  In Part 1, you'll focus on the history of the strike.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literacy skills while learning more about the same event.

Click HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Innovation: Inventors of the Industrial Revolution:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll identify some of the key inventors of the Industrial Revolution, describe their inventions, and explain their significance. Most of the inventors you’ll learn about come from the Second Industrial Revolution--often known as the “Technological Revolution,” a time when American inventors created a host of new devices across a range of industries that increased efficiency and production, enhanced safety, furthered communication, and made the day-to-day lives of Americans a little easier.

Check out the related tutorial: Captains of Industry: The Second Industrial Revolution

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island.  You'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S., and you'll compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Captains of Industry: The Second Industrial Revolution:

In this interactive tutorial, learn some of the differences between the First and Second Industrial Revolutions, as well as key developments that drove the Second Industrial Revolution. You'll also learn about some of the leaders of industry during this era, including John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and J.P. Morgan, and examine how their development of major industries and business practices affected America’s economy during the Second Industrial Revolution.

Check out this related tutorial:  The Power of Innovation: Inventors of the Industrial Revolution.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Populist Revolt:

In this interactive tutorial, discover the Populist movement of the 1890s, which channeled the frustrations of American farmers into a new political party: The People's Party.  You'll also learn about the gold vs. silver debate that angered so many Populists, and you'll learn about the legacy of Populism in U.S. History.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Assessments

Quiz: America in the 1920s:

Test your knowledge of the "Roaring Twenties" with a 9-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Quiz: Progressivism :

Test your knowledge of the Progressive era with this 5-question multiple choice quiz!

Type: Assessment

Quiz: The Gilded Age :

Test your knowledge of the Gilded Age with this 10-question multiple choice quiz!

Type: Assessment

Text Resources

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Swift and Co. v. U.S. (1905):

Learn more about the 1905 landmark Supreme Court decision Swift and Co. v. U.S. In this case, the Court considered issues of trusts, business practices, regulations, monopolies, and capitalism in the Gilded Age.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: United States v. E.C. Knight (1895):

Learn more about the 1895 landmark Supreme Court decision U.S. v. E.C. Knight. In this case, the Court considered issues of trusts, business practices, regulations, monopolies, and capitalism in the Gilded Age.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Lochner v. New York (1905):

Learn more about the 1906 landmark Supreme Court decision Lochner v. New York. In this case, the Supreme Court established an important precedent that would last for decades when it struck down a labor law setting maximum working hours.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

U.S. History Overview: Reconstruction to the Great Depression:

Learn about key events in American history from the Reconstruction Era to the start of the Great Depression in this tutorial video provided by Khan Academy. The video touches on the Reconstruction Amendments, Jim Crow laws, the Coinage Act and the Panic of 1873, the Spanish-American War, World War I, and the 18th and 19th Amendments.

Type: Tutorial

Communism:

In this tutorial video brought to you by Khan Academy, you'll learn about the economic system called communism. This video explores the origins and history of communism and explains its connections to authoritarian forms of government.

Type: Tutorial

The Gilded Age: Part 2:

Learn about the Second Industrial Revolution and the expansion of railroads across America, new inventions like the elevator and telephone, and the rise of captains of industry like Andrew Carnegie in a short video by Khan Academy. Helpful graphics illustrate the content. Enjoy this journey back to the Gilded Age!

Type: Tutorial

The Gilded Age: Part 1:

Receive an introduction to the Gilded Age in this short video provided by Khan Academy. The Gilded Age, which fell between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the Progressive era, was a time of intense industrialization that saw the rise of captains of industry like John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie. Enjoy this quick trip through American history!

Type: Tutorial

Majority Rules: Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918):

Learn the historical context for a landmark Supreme Court decision, Hammer v. Dagenhart, in this short interactive tutorial. This case dealt with child labor in the early 20th century. You'll have a chance to evaluate the case on your terms before seeing how the justices actually ruled. Enjoy!

Type: Tutorial

Theodore Roosevelt & the United Mine Strike:

In this short video, learn about how President Theodore Roosevelt mediated a labor dispute, the Coal Strike of 1902, and how critics charged him with violating the Constitution.

Type: Tutorial

Trust Busting: Theodore Roosevelt:

Learn about President Theodore Roosevelt, a progressive who believed in using the power of the government to restore economic opportunities and correct injustices in American society. This short video explores Roosevelt's groundbreaking work as a trust-buster.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: William Howard Taft:

View a brief, funny video about the 27th President, William Howard Taft, a progressive who had the difficult task of following in the footsteps of his mentor, Theodore Roosevelt!

Type: Tutorial

Whose Land is This?:

Learn about America's history in this interactive tutorial. This webisode from PBS's History: A Freedom of Us provides detailed informational texts, primary source documents that include photographs, and online quizzes to help you explore aspects of this complex time in American history. You'll learn about the 1862 Homestead Act, the rise of immigration, different aspects of the immigrant experience, the expansion of the American West, and the violent conflicts that resulted in the deaths of Native Americans and the removal and relocation of different tribes onto reservations.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Theodore Roosevelt:

View a brief, funny video about our 26th President, Theodore Roosevelt, the progressive, trustbuster, and canal builder!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Progressive Presidents:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era. You'll specifically look at the domestic and foreign policies of 3 presidents: Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, and Woodrow Wilson, all of whom had progressive ideas about how government should be operated. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S History: The Industrial Economy:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind tour of America during the Industrial Revolution. After the Civil War, many changes in technology and ideas gave rise to a new industrialism. You'll learn about industry leaders of the time, such as Vanderbilt, Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Morgan. Enjoy this "crash course" review about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S History: Westward Expansion:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the period of Westward Expansion when white settlers moved west - often at the expense of the Native Americans who lived there. Many Americans who traveled westward at this time were in search of economic stability and property. Enjoy this "crash course" review of U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Immigrant Cities:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the migration patterns and influx of immigrants to our nation during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, along with the resultant growth of cities. These trends impacted the labor movement, workforce, and politics of this era. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Gilded Age Politics:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the Gilded Age, a period in American history where "politics were marked by a number of phenomenons, most of them having to do with corruption." These events led to populism and eventually to new legislation that regulated government and political corruption. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Progressive Era:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era in American history. During this time, people were attempting to solve governmental and societal issues, all while trying to better implement equality for all. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.