Standard 2: Reading Informational Text

General Information
Number: ELA.10.R.2
Title: Reading Informational Text
Type: Standard
Subject: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 10
Strand: Reading

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

ELA.10.R.2.AP.1
Describe the impact of multiple text structures.
ELA.10.R.2.AP.2
Explain the central idea(s) of historical American speeches and essays.
ELA.10.R.2.AP.3
Explain the author’s choices in establishing and achieving purpose(s) in historical American speeches and essays.
ELA.10.R.2.AP.4a
Compare the development of two opposing arguments on the same topic evaluating the effectiveness and validity of the claims.
ELA.10.R.2.AP.4b
Compare how the authors use the same information to achieve different arguments.

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