ELA.10.R.3.2

Paraphrase content from grade-level texts.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Most grade-level texts are appropriate for this benchmark.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 10
Strand: Reading
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1001350: English Honors 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001810: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002310: English 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1005310: American Literature (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1005350: Literature and the Arts 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1020810: American Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1020850: World Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1006310: Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1006320: Journalism 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1006330: Journalism 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007310: Speech 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007350: Debate 3 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007360: Debate 4 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1009310: Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001340: English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001345: English 2 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002381: Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL (Reading) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7910125: Access English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007315: Speech 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1005320: British Literature (Specifically in versions: 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1000414: Intensive Reading 2 (Specifically in versions: 2021 and beyond (current))
1005347: Humane Letters 2 Literature (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1005348: Humane Letters 2 Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
ELA.10.R.3.AP.2: Summarize information from grade-level texts, at the student’s ability level using the student’s mode of communication.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

The Power of Ideas: Paraphrasing President Clinton's Inaugural Address:

In this lesson, students will learn the basic rules for effective paraphrasing. Students will read the 1993 inaugural address of President Bill Clinton. They will paraphrase several key sections to develop their paraphrasing skills and deepen their knowledge of the United States foundational principles and global leadership referenced in the address. Students will also answer text-dependent questions to further analyze the ideas and content of President Clinton’s address.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Importance of Professionalism in the Workplace:

Using the case study, "Training Day: The Importance of Professionalism in the Workplace," students will research proper business etiquette and effective workplace communication. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Benjamin Franklin - A Man of Amazing Accomplishments: A Research Project:

In this lesson, students will create a research question based on The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Students will develop a research question about how a characteristic or event in the life of young Ben Franklin influenced an accomplishment of an older, mature Ben Franklin. Students will research the life of Ben Franklin to answer their questions and present their findings in a short oral presentation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Logos, Ethos, Pathos in "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro":

Students will read, understand, and analyze a speech by Fredrick Douglass through close reading and scaffolded learning tasks. Students will write an essay to support their analysis of the central idea of Douglass's speech, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro."

Type: Lesson Plan

Unit: Poems About Death Lesson 1 of 3-- "To an Athlete Dying Young" by A.E. Housman:

Students will read and analyze the poem, "To an Athlete Dying Young" for the figurative language of metaphor and imagery and how each works together to create both a somber mood and support the universal theme of death.

Type: Lesson Plan

Universal Themes in Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck:

Students will review the first three chapters/sections of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men to analyze character traits as they support the universal themes of anxiety and fear in this lesson. They will then compare the two themes using their analysis.

Type: Lesson Plan

Creating Brave New Voices amongst Students: Part III:

This is the culminating lesson in a three-part series designed to support students as they embrace poetry analysis. The purpose of this lesson is for students to reflect on the poems they analyzed in lessons one and two. Students will then create a digital presentation to share with the class that explains their analysis of the use of symbols, imagery, mood, and theme in poetry.

Type: Lesson Plan

Creating Brave New Voices Amongst Students: Part II:

This is Part 2 of a poetry unit designed to support students as they embrace the study of poetry. Part One focuses on universal themes. In this lesson, students read and analyze two poems for their use of imagery as it supports the mood of each.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fair is Foul and Foul is Fair: Analyzing Language and Mood in Macbeth:

This lesson is a culminating activity for Shakespeare’s Macbeth. By breaking down the Shakespearean language and paraphrasing the text to modern day language, students will use their new dialogue to transform their new version of the text into a short video. Students will deliver an oral presentation to the class to explain the choices they made in their new version of the scene.

Type: Lesson Plan

Protagonists and Antagonists:

In this lesson, students will analyze the character development of protagonists and antagonists from literature read over the course of the school year. Students will complete a note-taking activity as well as a graphic organizer to use as they answer an analysis question about the characterization of protagonists and antagonists across various genres of literature.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ripples of the Great Depression: 1930s to today:

In this lesson, students will gather information on aspects of the 1930s and the Great Depression including how they are linked to current issues and events, then create a presentation based on their findings and present it to the class. This lesson will help to build background knowledge for reading literature set in the 1930s and would be a good activity to complete before reading texts that take place during that period. This activity will develop students' research skills including evaluating sources, note-taking, and integrating information from multiple sources, as well as giving students opportunities to engage in creating digital presentations.

Type: Lesson Plan

ECE Child Growth and Development: Developmental Principles:

Students will describe a developmental principle using common academic vocabulary related to child growth and development. During a group discussion on developmental principles, students will define and provide examples of new and/or familiar vocabulary terms that are used in speaking and writing about early childhood education.

Type: Lesson Plan

ECE Child Growth and Development: Investigating Principles:

Students will use and build upon their prior knowledge to investigate a question related to child growth and development. As an introductory lesson to developmental principles, students will first self-reflect on their own childhood development. Then, students will evaluate the reliability of online resources as they conduct research, synthesize the information, and present their findings to a peer.

Type: Lesson Plan

Introduction to Learning Theories:

Students will compare and contrast different learning theories and discuss their implications for teaching and learning, in this lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Literary Analysis and Written Response:

Students will be practicing close reading and literary analysis skills, annotating, and writing an analysis of texts. During the class discussion, students will practice listening skills and use explicit examples from a text to support their analysis in this lesson. Suggested excerpts from Annie Dillard's From an American Childhood, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain are referenced in this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Characterization through The Hunger Games:

Students will review elements and types of characterization and will analyze the various characters in the novel The Hunger Games or any appropriate novel of the teacher's choosing.

Type: Lesson Plan

What You Say: Language Context Matters:

In this lesson students will read and analyze three texts: Amy Tan's "Mother Tongue," Richard Rodriguez's "Se Habla Espanol," and Zora Neale Hurston's "How it Feels to be Colored Me" looking at how the language in each expresses a specific tone and author’s style. Students will choose one of the three texts and write an analysis of how the author uses language to create tone and style.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who is A.A.A.’s Hero?:

In this lesson, students will read multiple texts, conduct online research, brainstorm ideas, and analyze and synthesize information. Students will also practice the arts of note-taking, writing concise and informative summaries, and collaborating with peers to learn more about South Africa's Anti-Apartheid (A.A.A.) movement and the hero who saved them.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and the use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series, so be sure to complete both parts.

Check out part two—Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and the use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series, so be sure to complete both parts.

Check out part two—Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and the use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series, so be sure to complete both parts.

Check out part two—Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.