Standard 3: Reading Across Genres

General Information
Number: ELA.10.R.3
Title: Reading Across Genres
Type: Standard
Subject: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 10
Strand: Reading

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

ELA.10.R.3.AP.1
Explain how figurative language creates mood in text(s).
ELA.10.R.3.AP.2
Summarize information from grade-level texts, at the student’s ability level using the student’s mode of communication.
ELA.10.R.3.AP.3
Describe how mythical, classical or religious texts have been adapted.
ELA.10.R.3.AP.4
Summarize an author’s use of rhetoric in a text.

Related Resources

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Lesson Plans

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In this lesson, students will read an excerpt from John F. Kennedy's speech, commonly titled "A Moral Issue", in response to the Civil Rights Movement. Upon reading the text, students will analyze and evaluate President Kennedy's use of ethos, as well as the impact of delivering the speech via live broadcast. 

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The Power of Ideas: Paraphrasing President Clinton's Inaugural Address:

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Students will analyze testimony delivered to congress by Suffrage Activist Lucy Stone (1892) in support of amending the U.S. Constitution to give women the right to vote in this lesson. The lesson specifically focuses on Stone’s use of alliteration, antithesis (parallel structure), and rhetorical questions to help achieve her purpose.

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In this lesson plan, students will read Frederick Douglass’s 1852 speech “What, to the Slave, is the Fourth of July.” Students will analyze Douglass’s use of rhetorical appeals throughout the text. Students will specifically identify his use of pathos and logos and examine how Douglass uses these appeals to support his overall purpose. Students will also learn important historical context about Douglass and the abolitionist movement.

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An Abridged Hero: The Archetypal Hero's Journey in Novella and Poem:

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Poetry Perspectives: A Close Reading Lesson:

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Analyzing Logos, Ethos, Pathos in "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro":

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Creating Suspense Lesson 2: Analyzing Literary Devices in "The Lottery":

In this lesson (part 2 of 2 in a unit), students will read and analyze literary devices in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery." Students will practice text-coding the story to note uses of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. Students will complete a handout where they will analyze how Jackson creates suspense through the use of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay comparing and contrasting Edgar Allan Poe's use of suspense with Jackson's, making a claim as to which author more successfully creates a suspenseful mood.

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Creating Suspense Lesson 1: Analyzing Literary Devices in Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death":

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Original Student Tutorials

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Examine how the symbolism in Saki's short story "The Interlopers" contributes to the overall mood of the text.
This interactive tutorial is Part Two in a two-part series. Be sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to view Part One.

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Analyzing Narrative Techniques: Creating Suspense in Dracula (Part Two):

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Analyzing Narrative Techniques: Creating Suspense in Dracula (Part One):

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Language & Mood in "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow":

Learn how figurative language—including personification, hyperbole, and imagery—creates mood using excerpts from the short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" in this interactive tutorial.

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Teaching Ideas

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Text Resources

Jimmy Carter's Inaugural Address:

This teaching resource provides students with the opportunity to analyze President Jimmy Carter's use of rhetoric in his Inaugural Address. The resource contains historical context and both a student and teacher copy of the speech, along with text dependent questions and an answer key. Students will connect Carter’s use of rhetoric in achieving purpose in his speech to the role the U.S. has in establishing and maintaining peace.

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Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Family Feud: Analyzing Symbolism & Mood in "The Interlopers" (Part Two):

Examine how the symbolism in Saki's short story "The Interlopers" contributes to the overall mood of the text.
This interactive tutorial is Part Two in a two-part series. Be sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

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Type: Original Student Tutorial

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Type: Original Student Tutorial

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Learn how figurative language—including personification, hyperbole, and imagery—creates mood using excerpts from the short story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

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Type: Original Student Tutorial

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Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

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