LAFS.6.W.2.5

With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 6
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1001010: M/J Language Arts 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001020: M/J Language Arts 1 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002000: M/J Language Arts 1 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1006000: M/J Journalism 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)
1007000: M/J Speech and Debate 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)
1009000: M/J Creative Writing 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1009030: M/J Writing 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1100000: M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7810011: Access M/J Language Arts 1  (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1007025: M/J Speech and Debate (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2019, 2019 and beyond (current))
1009025: M/J Creative Writing (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5a: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing (e.g., define purpose, state your claim, gather evidence, create your argument, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5b: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing (e.g., choose a topic, introduce story elements, develop storyline, conclude story).
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5c: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop a plan for writing (e.g., determine the topic, gather information, develop the topic, provide a meaningful conclusion).
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5d: With guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing by revising and editing.
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5e: With guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing by revising and editing (e.g., review product, strengthening story).
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5f: With guidance and support from peers and adults, strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
LAFS.6.W.2.AP.5g: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessment

Making a Change with a Strong Argument:

The student will demonstrate that they can use the writing process (planning, editing, revising, and rewriting) to effectively produce a strongly supported argumentative claim. Using an informational text as a guide, the student will analyze the claims containing varying degrees of support) and will use knowledge and practice to make a claim about something in life, at home, or in school in which they would like to see a change. The student will use the same graphic organizer to plan their own writing and will work with a peer to edit, revise, and rewrite as necessary.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Narrative Writing: A Lesson Learned the Hard Way in “Thank You, M’am”:

In this lesson, students will read Langston Hughes’ short story, “Thank You, M’am”, analyzing the impact of plot and character in developing the story’s theme. After reading the story, students will use details gathered from the text to write a narrative that predicts/portrays what would occur if the characters met again.

Type: Lesson Plan

Narrative Writing: Climate Change and “The Sand Castle”:

In this lesson, students will view a video about climate change, read and analyze a short story depicting the effects of climate change, and write their own narratives sending a message to their readers about the impact of climate change.

Type: Lesson Plan

Views on Freedom: Part 3 of 3:

This final lesson in a three-lesson unit guides students carefully through the entire process of writing an essay based on the concept of freedom and using text evidence from four sources - the poems "Words Like Freedom"/"Refugee in America" and "Sympathy," the nonfiction text "Nelson Mandela Reflects on Working toward Freedom" and the folk tale "The People Could Fly." The lesson consists of a review of the two previous lessons in the series, four days of organizing thoughts and getting teacher and peer feedback on each step in the essay, and producing a final copy. An assignment sheet, detailed organizer for students who need extra support, and rubric are all provided. Students must have completed lessons #1 and #2 in this series to complete this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Graphic Organizers For Science Reading/Writing:

This activity emphasizes the importance of teaching reading and writing strategies for students to use with informational text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Ideas

Character Clash: Revising Dialogue in Narrative Writing:

In this teaching idea provided by ReadWriteThink.org, the teacher reviews with students how to write a paragraph containing dialogue. Students then use a piece of their own narrative writing to highlight the speech of each character in a different color. Students then go through their writing again, looking for and correcting character clashes that happen when two speakers are highlighted in the same paragraph. An additional online tool is provided to help students revise their word choice for "said" and replace the word with a stronger, more specific dialogue tag.

Type: Teaching Idea

Show-Me Sentences:

Students are provided with 'telling' sentences; the students must then practice revising the sentences to add imagery, description, and detail to turn them into 'showing' sentences.

Type: Teaching Idea

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.