SS.8.A.3.5

Describe the influence of individuals on social and political developments during the Revolutionary era.

Clarifications

Examples may include, but are not limited to, James Otis, Mercy Otis Warren, Abigail Adams, Benjamin Banneker, Lemuel Haynes, Phyllis Wheatley.
General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 8
Strand: American History
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2100010: M/J United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100015: M/J United States History & Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100020: M/J United States History Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100025: M/J United States History Advanced & Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7821026: Access M/J United States History and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond)
2100035: M/J United States History Digital Technologies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
7821025: Access M/J United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
2100045: M/J United States History & Civics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.8.A.3.In.e: Identify the influence of individuals on social and political developments, such as James Otis—“taxation without representation,” Abigail Adams—women’s rights, Mercy Otis Warren—abolition of slavery, or Benjamin Banneker—architecture.
SS.8.A.3.Su.e: Recognize an influence of an individual on social and political developments, such as James Otis—“taxation without representation,” Abigail Adams—women’s rights, Mercy Otis Warren—abolition of slavery, or Benjamin Banneker—architecture.
SS.8.A.3.Pa.e: Recognize that an individual can influence social developments.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

The Revolutionary War: Historical Fiction Connection Using My Brother Sam is Dead:

This web resource from Discovery Education provides teaching ideas on using James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier's My Brother Sam is Dead to help students understand how they can learn about the past through historical novels. Students will investigate how some people take one side or another in a war or other conflict; some people find themselves caught in the middle.

Type: Teaching Idea

Unit/Lesson Sequence

George Washington: First in War, First in Peace, and First in the Hearts of Countrymen :

Through this three-lesson unit examining George Washington's role in the French and Indian War, at the Federal Convention, and as chief executive, students will analyze a variety of primary source documents to help evaluate whether Washington's actions were characteristic of good leadership. The unit includes focus questions that may be used in Socratic seminars, cooperative learning, individual, and group work.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.