SC.6.N.1.2

Explain why scientific investigations should be replicable.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 6
Body of Knowledge: Nature of Science
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Big Idea: The Practice of Science -

A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation.

B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of "the scientific method."

C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.

D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2002040: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002050: M/J Comprehensive Science 1, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2001010: M/J Earth/Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000010: M/J Life Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000020: M/J Life Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003010: M/J Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7820015: Access M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2002055: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 Accelerated Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003030: M/J STEM Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002200: M/J STEM Environmental Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2001025: M/J STEM Astronomy and Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000025: M/J STEM Life Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.6.N.1.In.2: Identify that scientific investigations can be repeated the same way by others.
SC.6.N.1.Su.2: Recognize that experiments involve procedures that can be repeated the same way by others.
SC.6.N.1.Pa.2: Recognize that when a common activity is repeated, it has the same result.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

The Human Catapult:

Students will replicate an investigation to test a new amusement park ride, The Human Catapult. They will build a prototype catapult and compare their findings with that of the company, Innovative Engineering Design, Inc. Students will learn the importance of replication; the safety of future riders is at stake!

Type: Lesson Plan

Scientific Replication MEA:

This MEA explores the idea of replication when completing scientific investigations. Students are asked to create a plan for Science Incorporated to determine if their investigations are replicable.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Survivor Millennium!:

Students will discover the importance of scientific replication by performing an investigation requiring them to write, and then follow, step-by-step instructions. The scenario will be based on the show Survivor and will involve making peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

Type: Lesson Plan

Is it valuable to repeat an experiment?:

It is important that experiments are repeated by other scientists. If similar results are not gathered, the conclusion(s) drawn would not have validity.

Type: Lesson Plan

Replication or Repetition? Why bother?:

Teacher will do demonstration mixing a clear liquid (vinegar) and a white powder (baking soda) resulting in a bubbling chemical reaction. The students will then be given the packages of materials and be asked to replicate the teacher's experiment, repeating their trial 3 times. Some groups will not be able to do this since their white powder is not baking soda, but cornstarch, which will not react with vinegar. Out of this discrepant event, the guiding questions will evoke the realization that accurate information is necessary to for replication of scientific investigations. Time will be spent differentiating replication from repetition.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Soccer Science: Why Experiments Need to be Replicable:

Help Ryan revise his soccer science experiment to make it replicable. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn what "replicable" means and why it's so important in science.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Scientific Replication MEA:

This MEA explores the idea of replication when completing scientific investigations. Students are asked to create a plan for Science Incorporated to determine if their investigations are replicable.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades K-8

Soccer Science: Why Experiments Need to be Replicable:

Help Ryan revise his soccer science experiment to make it replicable. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn what "replicable" means and why it's so important in science.

 

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Soccer Science: Why Experiments Need to be Replicable:

Help Ryan revise his soccer science experiment to make it replicable. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn what "replicable" means and why it's so important in science.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.