SS.5.CG.2.1

Discuss the political ideas of Patriots, Loyalists and other colonists about the American Revolution.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Students will describe the political philosophy of American Patriots and why those ideas led them to declare independence from the British Empire.

Clarification 2: Students will explain why colonists would choose to side with the British during the American Revolution.

Clarification 3: Students will examine motivations for the decision to not take a side during the American Revolution.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 5
Strand: Civics and Government
Date Adopted or Revised: 05/24
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021070: Social Studies Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
7721016: Access Social Studies - Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.1: Identify political ideas of Patriots and Loyalists.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Solving Multi-Step Word Problems With "Undecided" Colonists:

Students will be divided into groups and given a set of multi-step real-world problems to solve. The word problems will be specific to topics important to the neutral colonists during the American Revolution. The lesson will conclude with a class discussion of the word problems tying the math and civics together in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Happens When A Patriot, Loyalist, and Colonist Have a Conversation?:

Students will work collaboratively to create a script to show their understanding of the political ideas of Patriots, Loyalists, and Colonists and the parts they played in the events that led to the American Revolution. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Multi-Step Word Problems with Loyalists and Patriots:

Students will be divided into groups and given a set of multi-step real-world problems to solve. The word problems will be specific to topics important to the Loyalists during the American Revolution. The lesson will  conclude with a class discussion of the word problems tying the math and civics together in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral- Part 3:

Students will giving and taking feedback to make edits to Scratch projects before presenting. Students will take in all learned information about the perspectives of the colonists to write a short claim-evidence-reasoning paragraph response on they would have chosen and why.  Students will wrap up this lesson as part three of a three-part Civics and Coding integrated series.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot Leaders and their Perspectives :

Students will learn about colonists who were Patriots during the American Revolution. Students will identify different Patriot perspectives regarding independence, roles in the American Revolution, and political beliefs. After this lesson, students will be able to identify similarities of colonial Patriots and what it meant to be a Patriot.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral- Part 2:

Students will be taking the informational notes from Lesson 1 to plan and create a group Scratch to inform others about the reasons why a colonist would have been a Patriot or a Loyalist.  Students will continue this lesson as the second part of a three-part Civics and Coding integrated series.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral- Part 1 :

In this Civics and Coding integrated lesson, students will complete research on Patriots and Loyalists from colonial times. Students will identify reasons that colonists would have chosen to be a patriot, loyalist, or neutral.  This is lesson one of a three-part unit that will culminate with a student-created Scratch project.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Multi-Step Word Problems With Patriots and Loyalists:

Students will be divided into groups and given a set of multi-step real-world problems to solve. The word problems will be specific to topics important to the Patriots during the American Revolution. The lesson will conclude with a class discussion of the word problems tying the math and civics together in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Lead Up to the American Revolution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about some of the most influential events that led to the American Revolution. They will read around the room on posters with important information as they fill out their outline.

Type: Lesson Plan

Am I a Patriot, Loyalist or Neutral?:

The main purpose of this lesson is to allow students to engage in active discussion and persuasive arguments regarding the choice to be a Patriot, Loyalist, or remain neutral (undecided) during the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 7: Create A Children’s Book:

Students will create a children’s book to explain Aaron Burr’s and Alexander Hamilton’s political participation and political views. Students will use carefully chosen text features and a specific text structure that best contributes to the overall meaning of the text. This is the culminating lesson in a unit using the text Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History by Don Brown.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 2 Significant People:

In lesson 2 of this unit, students choose one person to research from the Revolutionary War as a prereading activity for the text, Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History, by Don Brown. The teacher presents information about King George III. The options for students are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Mason. Students conduct research using the research notetaker, then present important information to a small group of peers about the person they learned about.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 1: Revolutionary War:

Students will read background information about the Revolutionary War. While they are reading, they will learn about the Stamp Act and Townshend Acts. In addition, the students will complete a jigsaw activity to find relevant details that support the central idea of the text.  To end the lesson, students will write a summary, using the central idea and relevant details from the passage about the Revolutionary War.

This is the first lesson to use in the Aaron and Alexander text unit. This lesson should be taught before reading the book.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 6: Compare and Contrast Two Significant Individuals:

After learning about The Revolutionary War and reading Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History By Don Brown, students will write an essay either comparing and contrasting Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton's political participation or their political views. Students will engage in a cooperative learning activity to brainstorm, use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast and use a rubric to evaluate their final product.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron & Alexander: Lesson 5: Comparing and Contrasting Aaron & Alexander:

This lesson will cover pages 1-11 of the text Aaron & Alexander, the Most Famous Duel in American History. The teacher will read pages 1-11 and lead a discussion on the early life, political views, and civic participation of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. Students will identify the text structure and how it contributes to the information in the text. Students will begin adding information to the unit’s graphic organizer.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriots or Loyalists: Which side would you choose?:

This lesson guides students through understanding the difference between a Patriot and a Loyalist during the colonial period and the start of the Revolutionary War.  Students will be given a side to defend in a constructive conversation after reading several passages and reviewing a point/counterpoint document.

Type: Lesson Plan

Revolutionary War Feelings:

Students will read an excerpt of a firsthand account from a Patriot, Loyalist, or other colonist. Students will then decide which colonist they identify with most closely and analyze the author’s perspective about the Revolutionary War in this integrated lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot or Loyalist? You Decide:

In this lesson, students will hear brief perspectives from a Loyalist, a Patriot, and a neutral colonist. They will work collaboratively to try to determine where historical figures aligned during the time of the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Idea

Grade 5 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 5 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

Grade 5 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 5 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea