Standard 2: Civic and Political Participation

General Information
Number: SS.5.CG.2
Title: Civic and Political Participation
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 5
Strand: Civics and Government (Starting 2023-2024)

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

SS.5.CG.2.AP.1
Identify political ideas of Patriots and Loyalists.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.2
Recognize ways citizens participate in the political process historically and in modern times.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.3
Recognize voting rights within the U.S. Constitution.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.4
Recognize duties and responsibilities that citizens are expected to fulfill.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.5
Recognize Florida’s U.S. senators and representatives from their district.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.6
Identify a symbol and a document that represents the United States.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plans

Hidden Figures: Constitutional Republic:

This is lesson #5 in the text unit series for Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. In this lesson, students will practice determining the meaning of unknown words in chapters 7-8. Additionally, they will complete a writing assignment explaining how citizens preserved the United States constitutional republic through civic duties.

In this text unit of Hidden Figures, students will explain how text features such as photos, captions, and headings contribute to the meaning of several chapters. Students will also explain how relevant details support the central idea of different sections. Throughout the text, students will determine the meaning of unknown words. Students will connect to civics by identifying civic duties and responsibilities of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson. Additionally, students will provide examples of powers given to the national government and those reserved to the states. The students will explain why the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the system and review previous Supreme Court rulings.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Political Participation Today:

Students will learn about the ways citizens participate in the political process today through a PowerPoint presentation showing the U.S. Constitution. The teacher will go over what these forms of political participation looked like in the colonial period compared to today. Students will take notes from the presentation on a graphic organizer provided to them with specific sections showing forms of political participation from today. This graphic organizer the students will then use to complete a poster during the small group work.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Star-Spangled Banner Singing Competition:

In this integrated lesson, students will discuss the Star-Spangled banner as a symbol of the United States and review audience etiquette during its performance. Students will engage in being judges of the Star-Spangled Banner Singing Competition where they will define criteria to critique others’ performances.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Multi-Step Word Problems With "Undecided" Colonists:

Students will be divided into groups and given a set of multi-step real-world problems to solve. The word problems will be specific to topics important to the neutral colonists during the American Revolution. The lesson will conclude with a class discussion of the word problems tying the math and civics together in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hidden Figures: Civic Duties:

This is lesson #3 in the text unit series for Hidden Figures. Students will explain how relevant details support the central idea within the text. Additionally, students will identify civic duties and responsibilities Dorothy fulfills by working collaboratively with their groups.

In this text unit for Hidden Figures, students will explain how text features such as photos, captions and headings contribute to the meaning of the several chapters. Students will also explain how relevant details support the central idea of different sections. Throughout the text, students will determine the meaning of unknown words. Students will connect to civics by identifying civic duties and responsibilities of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherie Johnson. Additionally, students will provide examples of powers given to the national government and those reserved to the states. The students will explain why the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the system and review previous Supreme Court rulings.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hidden Figures: Oaths:

This is lesson #4 in the text unit series for Hidden Figures. Students will explain how text features contribute to the meaning of the text in a collaborative activity. Additionally, students will add new words to their vocabulary chart and discuss what may happen if a civil service oath is broken.

In this text unit for Hidden Figures, students will explain how text features such as photos, captions and headings contribute to the meaning of the several chapters. Students will also explain how relevant details support the central idea of different sections. Throughout the text, students will determine the meaning of unknown words. Students will connect to civics by identifying civic duties and responsibilities of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherie Johnson. Additionally, students will provide examples of powers given to the national government and those reserved to the states. The students will explain why the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the system and review previous Supreme Court rulings.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Comparing the U.S. Seal to the Florida State Seal:

This is lesson #7 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson, students will recognize the Great Seal as a national symbol and then compare and contrast the Great Seal of the United States to the Great Seal of Florida. Students will complete a graphic organizer and then write to tell how the two seals are alike and different.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of both The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both the Florida and the United States seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meanings. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hidden Figures Book Preview:

This is lesson #1 in the text unit series for Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. In this lesson, students will look through the book and predict the text structure. Additionally, they will begin a timeline and vocabulary chart that will be used throughout the text. This will begin the discussion of amendments and how the U.S. Constitution expanded civic participation.

In this text unit of Hidden Figures, students will explain how text features such as photos, captions, and headings contribute to the meaning of several chapters. Students will also explain how relevant details support the central idea of different sections. Throughout the text, students will determine the meaning of unknown words. Students will connect to civics by identifying civic duties and responsibilities of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson. Additionally, students will provide examples of powers given to the national government and those reserved to the states. The students will explain why the U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the system and review previous Supreme Court rulings.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Duties and Responsibilities: Part 3:

In this integrated lesson, students will input text and audio in Scratch for a digital presentation to explain civic duties and responsibilities. Students will collaborate in teams to showcase major aspects of civic duties and responsibilities. This is lesson 3 of a 3 lesson series that integrates civics with computer science using the Scratch program.

Type: Lesson Plan

Colonial Political Participation:

Students will learn about the different forms of political participation during the colonial period through a PowerPoint presentation. Students will take notes from the presentation on a graphic organizer provided to them with specific sections, such as juries, militia service, election participation, and town meetings. The teacher will provide the graphic organizer to be used by the students to complete during direct instruction and later used when they complete the concept maps during small group instruction. The lesson will introduce and allow the students to participate in a class investigation about the different forms of political participation the colonial people were involved in.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Great Seal Expository Essay:

This is the last of 8 lessons in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, focusing on pages 8-19 and 23. In this lesson, students will analyze the symbols used to create the Great Seal and will use the knowledge learned to deepen their understanding of symbols—what they represent and why they are chosen. As a culminating activity, students will develop a personal great seal by writing an expository essay that explains the symbols chosen to represent the country and why.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities, they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Vocabulary Mapping:

This is lesson 2 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, focusing on pages 4-21. Students will develop their own definition for targeted civics vocabulary words and non-linguistic representations to deepen their knowledge of academic language. They will begin to build background knowledge as they continue to discover how the Great Seal of the United States was created.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Throughout the unit, students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Currency Symbol Scavenger Hunt:

This is lesson 6 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, pages 12-19. Students will analyze the symbols used to create the Great Seal. Students will have a chance to explore artifacts such as the dollar bill, penny, and quarter with a magnifying glass. Students will add to background knowledge by continuing to discover how the Great Seal of the United States was created and what it stands for. Students will also create a great seal using symbols and explain the meanings behind the symbols.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Units is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Are You Prepared for A Natural Disaster?:

Students will work in small groups to prepare a visual presentation to engage the public with natural disaster preparedness.  They will communicate the importance of preparing, ways to prepare, and the idea that preparation is part of our civic responsibility in this integrated lesson plan.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

What Happens When A Patriot, Loyalist, and Colonist Have a Conversation?:

Students will work collaboratively to create a script to show their understanding of the political ideas of Patriots, Loyalists, and Colonists and the parts they played in the events that led to the American Revolution. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Timeline of Creating the Great Seal:

This lesson #4 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson, students will read the text and pull out the relevant details and important dates. They will then create a timeline and use the information to write a summary about the creation of the Great Seal of the United States.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities, they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Multi-Step Word Problems with Loyalists and Patriots:

Students will be divided into groups and given a set of multi-step real-world problems to solve. The word problems will be specific to topics important to the Loyalists during the American Revolution. The lesson will  conclude with a class discussion of the word problems tying the math and civics together in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral- Part 3:

Students will giving and taking feedback to make edits to Scratch projects before presenting. Students will take in all learned information about the perspectives of the colonists to write a short claim-evidence-reasoning paragraph response on they would have chosen and why.  Students will wrap up this lesson as part three of a three-part Civics and Coding integrated series.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot Leaders and their Perspectives :

Students will learn about colonists who were Patriots during the American Revolution. Students will identify different Patriot perspectives regarding independence, roles in the American Revolution, and political beliefs. After this lesson, students will be able to identify similarities of colonial Patriots and what it meant to be a Patriot.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral- Part 2:

Students will be taking the informational notes from Lesson 1 to plan and create a group Scratch to inform others about the reasons why a colonist would have been a Patriot or a Loyalist.  Students will continue this lesson as the second part of a three-part Civics and Coding integrated series.

Type: Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln: Life of Honesty: A Time(line) of Freedom:

This is lesson #7 in the text unit series for Abraham Lincoln: A Life of Honesty by Tonya Leslie. After a read aloud students will use the text to create a timeline of Lincoln’s presidency as it relates to the abolition of slavery.

This unit will help students explain why the United States Constitution is an important document that protects the rights of American citizens, the responsibilities of the United States government, and how Abraham Lincoln is an important symbol of the United States Government.

Students will engage in a read aloud spread out over several lessons emphasizing vocabulary, central idea, research, expository and opinion writing, and collaboration in groups.

The teacher will facilitate vocabulary instruction, student research, determination of central ideas, student presentation, expository and opinion writing, and group collaboration to help students demonstrate why the United States Constitution is an important document.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral- Part 1 :

In this Civics and Coding integrated lesson, students will complete research on Patriots and Loyalists from colonial times. Students will identify reasons that colonists would have chosen to be a patriot, loyalist, or neutral.  This is lesson one of a three-part unit that will culminate with a student-created Scratch project.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Getting to Know the Great Seal:

This is lesson #1 in the paired text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson students will make observations about relevant details on The Great Seal of the United States, as a prereading activity. Then students will complete a graphic organizer to demonstrate what they see, what they inferred or predicted each symbol represents in regard to the United States, and what they still wonder about The Great Seal.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Units is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of both The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to ither documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Real-World Problems P-3:

This integrated lesson includes students practicing multistep problem-solving while analyzing the mathematical thinking of others and justifying their results by explaining methods and processes.  Students will work in groups to solve a real-world problem, involving a citizenship context, by using a strategy of their choice.  As a class, the students will analyze the different ways the remainder can be interpreted based on different questions involving the same context.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Article: Are You Prepared for A Natural Disaster? :

Students will read about dangers associated with different types of natural disasters in Florida and will explore how to prepare for them.  The class will discuss natural disaster preparedness as a form of civic responsibility.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Shhh! We're Writing the Constitution: National Symbols - The U.S. Constitution:

This is lesson 10 in text unit for Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution by Jean Fritz. After reading the text, this lesson will focus on the central idea that the U.S. Constitution is a recognized symbol of the United States, and details that support the central idea. Students will recognize that the writing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution was necessary for the United States to be a unified country rather than individual states. After reading Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution, students will identify the central idea of the text and specific details that support it using a graphic organizer. The lesson is introduced using fictitious digital media post as a platform to engage students to interact with the content.

This unit will help students understand why and how the Constitution was created, including: the original thirteen colonies and important historical figures present during the creation, the challenges and conflicts that state representatives faced during writing the Constitution, motifs and themes during the “Grand Convention,” and the relationship between state and national constitutions. Lessons will allow students to identify citizens’ civic duties outlined by the Constitution, the relationship between the federal and state Constitutions, and important historical symbols. Each part of the unit will include an in-depth dive into vocabulary and how it applies to the meaning of the text.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Shhh! We're Writing the Constitution: Researching our Representatives:

This is lesson #8 in the text unit for Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution by Jean Fritz. After reading the text, students will choose a representative (historical figures in the text) to research further. Students will complete a graphic organizer pulling information from the text and then use online sources and books to gather further information about their chosen historical figure.

This unit will help students understand why and how the Constitution was created, including: the thirteen colonies and important historical figures present during the creation of the Constitution, the challenges and conflicts that state representatives faced during writing the Constitution, motifs and themes during the “Grand Convention,” and the relationship between state and national constitutions. Lessons will allow students to identify citizens’ civic duties outlined by the Constitution, the relationship between the federal and state Constitutions, and important historical symbols. Each part of the unit will include an in-depth dive into vocabulary and how it applies to the meaning of the text.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Multi-Step Word Problems With Patriots and Loyalists:

Students will be divided into groups and given a set of multi-step real-world problems to solve. The word problems will be specific to topics important to the Patriots during the American Revolution. The lesson will conclude with a class discussion of the word problems tying the math and civics together in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Human Impact on Environment LESSON 3:

In this integrated lesson plan, Students will review civic responsibilities and come up with ways they can fulfill their civic duties by helping nearby ecosystems.  They will start with a school litter cleanup, then brainstorm other issues around their community and possible ways to help.  Individual students will then create flyers to display around their neighborhoods to inform residents of the issue and persuade them to help.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Lead Up to the American Revolution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about some of the most influential events that led to the American Revolution. They will read around the room on posters with important information as they fill out their outline.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Real-World Problems P-2:

This integrated lesson includes students solving multi-step real-world word problems using the four operations. Students will solve word problems involving citizen’s duties and responsibilities by using a strategy of their choice and analyzing the context to interpret remainders.

Type: Lesson Plan

Human Impact on Ecosystems LESSON 2:

In this integrated lesson plan, students will review what wetlands are and how humans are affecting wetlands.  They will discuss what government agencies are doing to help restore and protect wetlands.  Groups will be assigned different ecosystems to brainstorm possible human impacts and how plants and animals may adapt to these changes in their environment. Groups will also come up with a plan for a government agency to implement in order to limit human impact on that ecosystem.  By the end of the lesson, groups will share their ideas with the class.

Type: Lesson Plan

Have You Experienced A Natural Disaster? :

Students will be introduced to Natural Disasters by using a KWL Chart. They will list and be able to explain some Natural Disasters that take place in Florida. Students will write to learn using an interactive presentation with facts and pictures to complete a graphic organizer.  In this integrated lesson plan, students will explore how developing a preparedness plan is an important part of being a responsible citizen.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Duties and Responsibilities: Part 2:

In this integrated lesson, students will create a text and corresponding audio in Scratch for a digital presentation to explain civic duties and responsibilities. Students will collaborate in teams to showcase major aspects of civic duties and responsibilities.  This is lesson 2 of 3 lesson series that integrates civics with computer science and coding using the Scratch program. 

 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Seal" of Approval: Coding and Civics Integration Part III:

This lesson is the final lesson in a three-part mini-unit on coding and integrated civics. In this integrated civics lesson, students will be using all of the research and information gathered from the lesson II planning and design sheet in order to create a program on Scratch that explains the different components of the Great Seal of the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Human Impact on Ecosystems LESSON 1:

Students will build on background knowledge of human impact on ecosystems and what plants and animals have done to adapt to these changes to their environments. They will read about and discuss human impact on Florida wetlands. During and after reading, students will annotate their reading. This integrated lesson plan will spark about what citizens and governments agencies can and are doing to help restore the wetland ecosystems.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Real World Problems P-1:

Students will be exposed to several word problems involving citizens' duties and responsibilities, guiding them to reflect on what could happen if citizens do not fulfill their responsibilities. As the lesson progresses, the students will learn to combine addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve multistep word problems in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Duties and Responsibilities Part 1:

In this integrated lesson, students will create a themed stage in Scratch for a digital presentation to explain civic duties and responsibilities. Students will collaborate in teams to showcase major aspects of civic duties and responsibilities. This is lesson 1 of a 3 lesson series that integrates civics with computer science and coding using the Scratch program. The final product of the unit will conclude with a collaborative digital project that contains text and recorded student voices explaining civic duties and responsibilities.

Type: Lesson Plan

Voting Rights Amendments: The Voting Rights Act of 1965:

In this lesson plan, students will create and analyze a line graph to explore how the Voting Rights Act of 1965 expanded civic participation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Duties & Responsibilities:

In this lesson plan, explore what a constitutional republic is, understand what civic duties and responsibilities are, and provide examples. Students will complete a tableau activity to synthesize information in cooperative learning and kinesthetic learning. Students can complete an exit ticket and/or a constructed response.

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Seal" of Approval: Coding and Integrated Civics Part II:

This lesson plan serves as the second step in a series of a three-lesson mini-unit. Within this integrated civics lesson, students will begin the "unplugged" designing process of their Scratch coding project. Students will research the Great Seal of the United States and prepare to input the information gathered into their own project. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Securing the Job :

In this lesson plan, students explore Florida’s legislative branch of government, receiving an overview of this branch of government, a comparison to the federal government’s legislative branch, and the necessary qualifications to run for Congress in Florida. Students will also explore the term length, authority, duties, and compensation for Congress.

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Seal" of Approval: Coding and Integrated Civics Part I:

This lesson plan serves as the first step in a series of a three-lesson mini-unit. Within this integrated civics lesson, students will become acclimated to the ways in which computer science, and more specifically coding, have the ability to share factual information about national symbols. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Am I a Patriot, Loyalist or Neutral?:

The main purpose of this lesson is to allow students to engage in active discussion and persuasive arguments regarding the choice to be a Patriot, Loyalist, or remain neutral (undecided) during the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Participation: Expansion of Voting Rights :

In this lesson, students will analyze how the United States Constitution expanded civic participation over time. Students will make this determination by looking closely at the expansion of voting rights through the passage of the 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th Amendments and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents Florida? - The Senate :

In this lesson plan, students will review the legislative branch and learn about the history of the Senate. Students will look at the term length of senators, as well as the duties and authority of the Senate.  Students will then identify 4 senators that have represented and served Florida at the national level, across the course of history, through the development and completion of a timeline.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents Florida - U.S. House of Representatives :

In this lesson plan, students will briefly revisit the legislative branch, key jobs of the branch, and key facts about the House of Representatives.  Students will then identify the state’s U.S. representative(s) for their district. Students will develop a biography sheet for the representative for their district.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 7: Create A Children’s Book:

Students will create a children’s book to explain Aaron Burr’s and Alexander Hamilton’s political participation and political views. Students will use carefully chosen text features and a specific text structure that best contributes to the overall meaning of the text. This is the culminating lesson in a unit using the text Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History by Don Brown.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron & Alexander: Lesson 4 - Central Idea and Relevant Details - Alexander Hamilton:

This lesson focuses on the life of Alexander Hamilton, his political participation during and after the American Revolution, and his impact on the foundation of the United States. Students will read a brief passage about Hamilton's life, identify each paragraph's central idea and explain how relevant details support the central idea. This is a prereading lesson, the 4th lesson in a unit using the text, Aaron and Alexander; The Most Famous Duel in American History by Don Brown.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 2 Significant People:

In lesson 2 of this unit, students choose one person to research from the Revolutionary War as a prereading activity for the text, Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History, by Don Brown. The teacher presents information about King George III. The options for students are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Mason. Students conduct research using the research notetaker, then present important information to a small group of peers about the person they learned about.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Change a Law, Change History:

In this lesson plan, students will participate in a gallery walk of amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will illustrate and interpret the meaning of the amendments that cause major changes to the laws of the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents Me?:

Students will read a text about the duties and responsibilities of U.S. Senators and Representatives. Then students will identify the central idea and explain how relevant details support this idea within the text. Students will then research the U.S. senators or U.S. representative that represents them at the national level and present their findings to the class in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 1: Revolutionary War:

Students will read background information about the Revolutionary War. While they are reading, they will learn about the Stamp Act and Townshend Acts. In addition, the students will complete a jigsaw activity to find relevant details that support the central idea of the text.  To end the lesson, students will write a summary, using the central idea and relevant details from the passage about the Revolutionary War.

This is the first lesson to use in the Aaron and Alexander text unit. This lesson should be taught before reading the book.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 6: Compare and Contrast Two Significant Individuals:

After learning about The Revolutionary War and reading Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History By Don Brown, students will write an essay either comparing and contrasting Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton's political participation or their political views. Students will engage in a cooperative learning activity to brainstorm, use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast and use a rubric to evaluate their final product.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

So What? What's the Big Deal about the "Star-Spangled Banner"?:

To understand the overarching themes of freedom and resiliency in the United States of American, students will identify and analyze the figurative language in the poem “Defence of Fort M’Henry” which turned into our National Anthem. After close reading and group consensus conversation, and possible extension exploration & research, a written or digital presentation which demonstrates students understanding of the “Star-Spangled Banner’s” significance as a symbol of the United States will be the resulting work product of this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron & Alexander: Lesson 5: Comparing and Contrasting Aaron & Alexander:

This lesson will cover pages 1-11 of the text Aaron & Alexander, the Most Famous Duel in American History. The teacher will read pages 1-11 and lead a discussion on the early life, political views, and civic participation of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. Students will identify the text structure and how it contributes to the information in the text. Students will begin adding information to the unit’s graphic organizer.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bill of Rights Visual and Manipulatives :

Students will use visuals to match descriptions of the Bill of Rights. Students will reflect on the impact of the Bill of Rights in a writing prompt. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriots or Loyalists: Which side would you choose?:

This lesson guides students through understanding the difference between a Patriot and a Loyalist during the colonial period and the start of the Revolutionary War.  Students will be given a side to defend in a constructive conversation after reading several passages and reviewing a point/counterpoint document.

Type: Lesson Plan

American Symbols: Civics and Coding Part 3:

This is lesson 3 of 3 that will integrate ELA, Civics and Computer Science to create a visual presentation using Block coding with Scratch to demonstrate knowledge of the symbols within the Great Seal of the United States. In this lesson, students will use their template to code a Scratch program that explains the symbolism of the Great Seal of the United States. After developing their block coding, students will use the grading rubric to review for any errors, potential debugging, and suggest changes.

Type: Lesson Plan

Revolutionary War Feelings:

Students will read an excerpt of a firsthand account from a Patriot, Loyalist, or other colonist. Students will then decide which colonist they identify with most closely and analyze the author’s perspective about the Revolutionary War in this integrated lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. SYMBOLS: “THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER”:

This lesson provides students with the opportunity to read and recognize how the “Star-Spangled Banner” anthem, originally named, “Defense of Fort McHenry,” represents the United States. By analyzing how the poetic elements of rhyme and imagery contribute to the meaning of each of the verses of the Star-Spangled Banner, students will recognize the importance of this American symbol.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Seal, Bill, Song, and Proclamation: Recognizing Symbols of the United States :

In this lesson plan, students will explain how the Great Seal, Bill of Rights, Star-Spangled Banner, and Emancipation Proclamation represent the United States. Students will create their own symbols to represent themselves.

Type: Lesson Plan

A House Divided Cannot Stand:

In this student-centered activity, students will study the literal and figurative meanings of one of Abraham Lincoln’s famous metaphors, “A house divided cannot stand.” By participating in various station activities, students will analyze how the figurative meaning of the metaphor aligned with the message in Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. 

Type: Lesson Plan

American Symbols: Civics and Coding Part 2:

This is lesson 2 of 3 that will integrate ELA, Civics and Computer Science to create a visual presentation using block coding with Scratch to demonstrate knowledge of the symbols within the Great Seal of the United States. In this lesson, students will use their research on the symbolism of the Great Seal to plan out a Scratch program that includes choosing a sprite and writing narration.

Type: Lesson Plan

American Symbols: Civics and Coding Part 1:

This is lesson 1 of 3 that will integrate ELA, Civics, and Computer Science to create a visual presentation using block coding with Scratch to demonstrate knowledge of the symbols within the Great Seal of the United States. This lesson will provide foundational information as students research and organize facts about the symbolism found in the Great Seal of the United States to determine how it illustrates the history of America.

Type: Lesson Plan

Amending the U.S. Constitution:

In this lesson plan, students will read and annotate information related to the process for amending the United States Constitution, specifically related to voting rights. Students will create a flow chart that shows the various methods to create amendments, and finish by reflecting on their learning process. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Voter Turnout and the 26th Amendment:

In this lesson plan, students will graph and interpret voter turnout data to explain how the 26th Amendment expanded the opportunity for civic participation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Climate Adaptations:

Students use their knowledge of animal and plant adaptations as they rank them for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s social media campaign. The purpose of the campaign is to raise awareness and funds to help protect the selected plant or animal species. Students will then use a government website to identify their local state representative to invite them to participate in the campaign. In the twist, the FDEP will ask students to rank the animals and plants again, but this time they must consider the rise in surface temperature and sea level rise predicted by 2099 in this Model Eliciting Activity. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Voter Turnout and the 24th Amendment:

Students will use voter turnout data to create and analyze a line graph to explain how the 24th Amendment expanded civic participation in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Practicing With Mean:

In this lesson plan, students will practice finding the mean of a set of data and be able to connect that to how mean is used in real-life. Students will be able to collect data, create line plots, interpret the data, and find the mean.

Type: Lesson Plan

Preparing for a Natural Disaster:

Students work collaboratively as they develop a procedure to determine the types of items they may need in case of a natural disaster, calculate costs to stay within a budget, identify civic responsibility, and understand how state and federal governments work together to protect U.S. citizens in this model eliciting activity.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations.  Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Voter Task Force:

Students will help the Supervisor of Elections determine which voter registration locations could be improved to help more citizens get registered to vote. Students will learn about the number of citizens who registered to vote in a general election year compared to the total population of those eligible to vote. They will discuss which voter registration locations will provide the most access to citizens and allocate funds to help address the issue in this modeling eliciting activity.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Voter Turnout and the 19th Amendment:

Students will graph and analyze voting data to explain how the 19th Amendment expanded civic participation in this lesson plan. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot or Loyalist? You Decide:

In this lesson, students will hear brief perspectives from a Loyalist, a Patriot, and a neutral colonist. They will work collaboratively to try to determine where historical figures aligned during the time of the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Voter Turnout and the 15th Amendment:

In this lesson plan, students will graph and analyze voting data to explain how the 15th Amendment expanded civic participation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Are The People in Your Neighborhood? Finding Your Elected Officials:

In this lesson, students will use the U.S. Constitution and their web searching skills to determine the constitutional qualifications for office, term length, authority, duties, activities, compensation, and names of elected officials for Florida and their district.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Voting Rights Amendments: The 26th Amendment:

Learn about the 26th Amendment and how it expanded the opportunity for civic participation in the United States with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voting Rights Act of 1965:

Learn about the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and how it increased the opportunity for civic participation in the United States with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Voting Rights Amendments: The 19th Amendment:

Learn about the history of the 19th Amendment and how it expanded civic participation with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Voting Rights Amendments: The 24th Amendment:

Learn how the 24th Amendment expanded the opportunity for civic participation with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Ideas

Grade 5 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 5 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

Who Are the People? Finding Your Elected Representative:

This PowerPoint slideshow is designed to support teachers in delivering direct instruction on Florida’s national representation, including determining the constitutional qualifications for office, term length, authority, duties, activities, compensation, and names of elected officials for Florida and their district. Students will also determine the best approach toward contacting elected officials. The accompanying guided notes can be completed by students during instruction.

Type: Teaching Idea

Video/Audio/Animations

Portraits in Patriotism - Ardian Zika: Elementary School:

Adrian Zika grew up in communist Yugoslavia (now Kosovo). He immigrated to the United States, became a U.S. citizen, and was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2018.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Luis Martínez Fernández: Elementary:

Luis Martínez-Fernández was born at the beginning of the Cuban Revolution. Dr. Martínez-Fernández immigrated to the United States with his family when he was 2 years old after the Bay of Pigs Invasion. His family moved to Lima, Peru after his father was offered employment there. Dr. Martínez-Fernández’s family left Peru after the President of Peru was ousted from power. The new government in Peru concerned Dr. Martínez-Fernández’s father and the family moved to Puerto Rico where they become U.S. Citizens. Dr. Martínez-Fernández moved to the U.S. after graduation from The University of Puerto Rico. He is a Professor of History, an author, and is civically engaged through his nationally syndicated column.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Mel Martinez: Elementary School:

Former U.S Senator and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Mel Martínez shares his journey to freedom in the United States. Mr. Martínez was part of Operation Pedro Pan in which unaccompanied Cuban children were sent to the United States to escape the newly formed communist regime of Fidel Castro. Before leaving Cuba, he spent time with his father who shared life lessons with his son. Mr. Martínez distinctly remembers the pilot announcing that they were in America. After moving around the state of Florida in settlement camps, Mr. Martínez was placed in foster care. After four years he and his family were reunited. Mr. Martínez helped his father become a veterinarian in the U.S and as a family they were highly active in the community. His family’s spirit of activism was the foundation of Mr. Martínez’s career as a public servant. He graduated from Florida State University Law School in 1973 and began his political career. He was appointed the U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 2001 and became a United States Senator in 2005.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Voting Rights Amendments: The 26th Amendment:

Learn about the 26th Amendment and how it expanded the opportunity for civic participation in the United States with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voting Rights Act of 1965:

Learn about the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and how it increased the opportunity for civic participation in the United States with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Voting Rights Amendments: The 19th Amendment:

Learn about the history of the 19th Amendment and how it expanded civic participation with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Voting Rights Amendments: The 24th Amendment:

Learn how the 24th Amendment expanded the opportunity for civic participation with this short video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Teaching Idea

Grade 5 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 5 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea