MA.8.AR.3.3

Given a table, graph or written description of a linear relationship, write an equation in slope-intercept form.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 8
Strand: Algebraic Reasoning
Status: State Board Approved

Benchmark Instructional Guide

Connecting Benchmarks/Horizontal Alignment

 

Terms from the K-12 Glossary

  • Intercept
  • Slope 

 

Vertical Alignment

Previous Benchmarks

Next Benchmarks

 

Purpose and Instructional Strategies

In grade 7, students translated between different representations of proportional relationships. In grade 8, students write an equation in slope-intercept form from a written description, a table, or a graph. In Algebra 1, students write a linear two-variable equation to represent a relationship given by a variety of mathematical and real-world contexts.
  • Point-slope form and standard forms are not expectations at this grade level.
  • Instruction connects proportional relationships to support the generation of the equation y = mx + b. Helping students see how the linear equation is both the same and different from the proportional relationship will support the appropriate use of proportional thinking using the rate of change.
  • Using an online dynamic graphing tool to explore how the graph changes as either the slope or the y-intercept changes helps students visualize the coefficients and constants in the equation (MTR.4.1).
  • Students should recognize in a table that the y-intercept is the y-value when x is equal to 0. The slope can be determined by finding the ratio between the change in two y-values and the change between the two corresponding x-values.
  • Using graphs, students identify the y-intercept as the point where the line crosses the y-axis and the slope as the vertical change divided by the horizontal change. In a linear equation, the coefficient of x is the slope and the constant is the y-intercept. Students need to be given the equations in formats other than y = mx + b, such as y = ax + b or y = b + mx.
  • Instruction includes using a variety of vocabulary to make connections to real-world
  • concepts and future courses. To describe the slope, one can say either “the vertical change divided by the horizontal change” or “rise over run.”
  • The instruction includes examples where the slope is positive or negative and the ??intercept is given as a positive or a negative in the equation.
  • When providing a graph, be sure there are easily identifiable points for students to use in calculating the slope.
  • Instruction allows students to make connections between the different representations of a linear relationship (MTR.2.1).

 

Common Misconceptions or Errors

  • Students may incorrectly identify the values for the slope and y-intercept.
  • Students may incorrectly calculate the slope with a common error of inverting the change in y and the change in x.

 

Strategies to Support Tiered Instruction

  • Teacher supports students who incorrectly identify the values for the slope and y-intercept by providing opportunities to notice patterns between a given value for b, a line graphed on the coordinate plane, and a given equation of the same line.
  • Teacher supports students who incorrectly calculate the slope by inverting the change in y and the change in x using error analysis tasks, in which the expression y1 - y2 / x1 - x2 is incorrectly written as x1 - x2 / y1 - y2, and has students find and correct the error.
  • Teacher supports students who invert the x and y values when calculating slope by using real-world problems that students can relate to and helping students represent the relationship visually.
  • Teacher co-creates an anchor chart naming the slope and y-intercept of a given line and then discusses where to start when graphing the line.
  • Instruction incudes graphing various linear equations from a table and then discussing the pattern students notice in regard to the y-intercept.
  • Teacher provides students with graphs and equations of several linear equations then co-illustrates connections between the slopes and y-intercepts of each line to the corresponding parts of each equation using the same color highlights.
  • Teacher co-creates a graphic organizer with students to include examples of positive and negative slope; the meaning of each variable in slope intercept form; and how to determine the slope and y-intercept in a table, graph and verbal description.

 

Instructional Tasks

Instructional Task 1 (MTR.7.1)
Victoria owns a store that sells board games. She made the following graph to relate the number of board games she sells to her overall profits.
graph relates the number of board games

 

  • Part A. Write an equation in slope-intercept form to describe this relation. Explain how to determine the equation.
  • Part B. What is the meaning of the y-intercept in the given context? What is the meaning of the slope in the given context?

 

Instructional Items

Instructional Item 1
Write an equation that represents the graph shown.
Graph

Instructional Item 2
The table shown represents a linear relationship. Using the table, write an equation in slope-intercept form.
Table

 

*The strategies, tasks and items included in the B1G-M are examples and should not be considered comprehensive.

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1205050: M/J Accelerated Mathematics Grade 7 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020, 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1205070: M/J Grade 8 Pre-Algebra (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1204000: M/J Foundational Skills in Mathematics 6-8 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7812030: Access M/J Grade 8 Pre-Algebra (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.8.AR.3.AP.3: Given a table or graph of a linear relationship, identify from a list, the equation in slope-intercept form.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Deriving Lines - 2:

Students are asked to derive the general equation of a line with a y-intercept of (0, b).

Type: Formative Assessment

Deriving Lines - 1:

Students are asked to derive the general equation of a line containing the origin.

Type: Formative Assessment

Profitable Functions:

Students are asked to write a function to model a linear relationship given its graph.

Type: Formative Assessment

Trekking Functions:

Students are asked to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities given a table of values.

Type: Formative Assessment

Construction Function:

Students are asked to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities given two ordered pairs in context.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

How Many Smoots Does It Take to Reach the Moon?:

In this discovery oriented lesson, students will explore the use of non-standard units of measurement. They will convert linear measurements within the metric system and convert measurements given in astronomical units (AU) into more familiar units, specifically meters and kilometers. The unit conversions will be completed with measurements that are expressed in scientific notation. Students will recall their prior knowledge of how to add and subtract numbers given in scientific notation. They will also use their knowledge of exponent rules to determine an efficient method for multiplying and dividing numbers expressed in scientific notation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Compacting Cardboard:

Students investigate the amount of space that could be saved by flattening cardboard boxes. The analysis includes linear graphs and regression analysis along with discussions of slope and a direct variation phenomenon.

Type: Lesson Plan

Home Lines:

Students will create an outline of a room and write equations of the lines that contain the sides of the room. This lesson provides an opportunity to review and reinforce writing equations of lines (including horizontal and vertical lines) and to apply the relationship between the slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Day at the Park:

In this activity, students investigate a set of bivariate data to determine if there is a relationship between concession sales in the park and temperature. Students will construct a scatter plot, model the relationship with a linear function, write the equation of the function, and use it to make predictions about values of variables.

Type: Lesson Plan

You Can Plot it! Bivariate Data:

Students create scatter plots, calculate a regression equation using technology, and interpret the slope and y-intercept of the equation in the context of the data. This review lesson relates graphical and algebraic representations of bivariate data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Basketball - it's a tall man's sport - or is it?:

The students will use NBA player data to determine if there is a correlation between the height of a basketball player and his free throw percentage. The students will use technology to create scatter plots, find the regression line and calculate the correlation coefficient.

Basketball is a tall man's sport in most regards. Shooting, rebounding, blocking shots - the taller player seems to have the advantage. But is that still true when shooting free throws?

Type: Lesson Plan

Scatter Plots:

This lesson is an introduction to scatterplots and how to use a trend line to make predictions. Students should have some knowledge of graphing bivariate data prior to this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hand Me Your Data:

Students will gather and use data to calculate a line of fit and the correlation coefficient with their classmates' height and hand size. They will use their line of fit to make approximations.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fit Your Function:

Students will make a scatter plot and then create a line of fit for the data. From their graph, students will make predictions and describe relationships between the variables. Students will make predictions, inquire, and formulate ideas from observations and discussions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scatter Plots and Correlations:

Students create scatter plots, and lines of fit, and then calculate the correlation coefficient. Students analyze the results and make predictions. This lesson includes step-by-step directions for calculating the correlation coefficient using Excel, GeoGebra, and a TI-84 Plus graphing calculator. Students will make predictions for the number of views of a video for any given number of weeks on the charts.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's Slope got to do with it?:

Students will interpret the meaning of slope and y-intercept in a wide variety of examples of real-world situations modeled by linear functions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cat Got Your Tongue?:

This lesson uses real-world examples to practice interpreting the slope and y-intercept of a linear model in the context of data. Students will collect data, graph a scatter plot, and use spaghetti to identify a line of fit. A PowerPoint is included for guidance throughout the lesson and guided notes are also provided for students.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fundamental Property of Reflections:

This lesson helps students discover that in a reflection, the line of reflection is the perpendicular bisector of any segment connecting any pre-image point with its reflected image.

Type: Lesson Plan

If the line fits, where's it?:

In this lesson students learn how to informally determine a "best fit" line for a scatter plot by considering the idea of closeness.

Type: Lesson Plan

Doggie Data: It's a Dog's Life:

Students use real-world data to construct and interpret scatter plots using technology. Students will create a scatter plot with a line of fit and a function. They describe the relationship of bivariate data. They recognize and interpret the slope and y-intercept of the line of fit within the context of the data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scrambled Coefficient:

Students will learn how the correlation coefficient is used to determine the strength of relationships among real data. Students use card sorting to order situations from negative to positive correlations. Students will create a scatter plot and use technology to calculate the line of fit and the correlation coefficient. Students will make a prediction and then use the line of fit and the correlation coefficient to confirm or deny their prediction.

Students will learn how to use the Linear Regression feature of a graphing calculator to determine the line of fit and the correlation coefficient.

The lesson includes the guided card sorting task, a formative assessment, and a summative assessment.

Type: Lesson Plan

Slippery Slopes:

This lesson will not only reinforce students understanding of slope and y-intercept, but will also ensure the students understand how it can be modeled in a real world situation. The focus of this lesson is to emphasize that slope is a rate of change and the y-intercept the value of y when x is zero. Students will be able to read a problem and create a linear equation based upon what they read. They will then make predictions based upon this information.

Type: Lesson Plan

Slope and y-Intercept of a Statistical Model:

Students will sketch and interpret the line of fit and then describe the correlation of the data. Students will determine if there’s a correlation between foot size and height by collecting data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Line of Fit:

Students will graph scatterplots and draw a line of fit. Next, students will write an equation for the line and use it to interpret the slope and y-intercept in context. Students will also use the graph and the equation to make predictions.

Type: Lesson Plan

From Tables to Graphs and Back!:

Students will match corresponding sets of tables, graphs and linear equations in order to deepen their understanding of multiple representations of the relationships between dependent and independent variables.

Type: Lesson Plan

In the Real World:

This resource provides a Lesson Plan for teaching students how to analyze real-world problems to look for clearly identified values and determine which of them is a constant value and which of them is subject to change (will increase or decrease per unit of time, weight, length, etc.). The students will also be taught how to determine the correct units for each value in an equation written in slope-intercept form.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Speeding Ticket (Part 1: Solving Linear Equations with One Variable):

"The Speeding Ticket" lesson uses real world application to create and solve linear equations and tables with one variable numerically, verbally, and algebraically. The student will also learn the relationship between the independent and dependent variables.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring Slope Intercept Form with Graphs and Physical Activity:

Students will work in pairs and compose three different linear equations in slope intercept form. They will discover and describe how different values for the slope and y-intercept affect the graph. After graphing lines on graph paper, they will do a physical activity involving graphing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scatter plots, spaghetti, and predicting the future:

Students will construct a scatter plot from given data. They will identify the correlation, sketch an approximate line of fit, and determine an equation for the line of fit. They will explain the meaning of the slope and y-intercept in the context of the data and use the line of fit to interpolate and extrapolate values.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the Going Rate?:

Students discover that the unit rate and the slope of a line are the same, and these can be used to compare two different proportional relationships. Students compare proportional relationships presented in table and graph form.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who goes faster, earns more, drives farthest?:

Given a proportional relationship, students will determine the constant of proportionality, write an equation, graph the relationship, and interpret in context.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Constructing Functions From Two Points:

Learn to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities and determine the slope and y-intercept given two points that represent the function with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Scatterplots Part 4: Equation of the Trend Line:

Learn how to write the equation of a linear trend line when fitted to bivariate data in a scatterplot in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 4 in 6-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Constructing Linear Functions from Tables:

Learn to construct linear functions from tables that contain sets of data that relate to each other in special ways as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Slope and Deep Sea Sharks:

Shark researcher, Chip Cotton, discusses the use of regression lines, slope, and determining the strength of the models he uses in his research.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Problem-Solving Tasks

DVD Profits, Variation 1:

In this task, students are asked to determine the unit price of a product under two different circumstances. They are also asked to generalize the cost of producing x items in each case.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

High School Graduation:

This task provides a unique application of modeling with mathematics. Also, students often think that time must always be the independent variable and so may need some help understanding that one chooses the independent and dependent variable based on the way one wants to view a situation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Sore Throats, Variation 2:

Students graph proportional relationships and understand the unit rate as a measure of the steepness of the related line, called the slope. Students will also treat slopes more formally when they graph proportional relationships and interpret the unit rate as the slope of the graph.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Who Has the Best Job?:

This task asks the student to graph and compare two proportional relationships and interpret the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Students are also asked to write an equation and graph each scenario.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Baseball Cards:

This task could be put to good use in an instructional sequence designed to develop knowledge related to students' understanding of linear functions in contexts. Though students could work independently on the task, collaboration with peers is more likely to result in the exploration of a range of interpretations.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Battery Charging:

This task has students engaging in a simple modeling exercise, taking verbal and numerical descriptions of battery life as a function of time and writing down linear models for these quantities. To draw conclusions about the quantities, students have to find a common way of describing them.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Modeling with a Linear Function:

The primary purpose of this task is to elicit common misconceptions that arise when students try to model situations with linear functions. This task, being multiple choice, could also serve as a quick assessment to gauge a class' understanding of modeling with linear functions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Comparing Speeds in Graphs and Equations:

This task provides the opportunity for students to reason about graphs, slopes, and rates without having a scale on the axes or an equation to represent the graphs. Students who prefer to work with specific numbers can write in scales on the axes to help them get started.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Chicken and Steak, Variation 1:

In this problem-solving task students are challenged to apply their understanding of linear relationships to determine the amount of chicken and steak needed for a barbecue, which will include creating an equation, sketching a graph, and interpreting both. This resource also includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Kimi and Jordan:

Students are asked to create and graph linear equations to compare the savings of two individuals. The purpose of the table in (a) is to help students complete (b) by noticing regularity in the repeated reasoning required to complete the table.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Video Streaming:

Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x,y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Chicken and Steak, Variation 2:

In this problem-solving task students are challenged to apply their understanding of linear relationships to determine the amount of chicken and steak needed for a barbecue, which will include creating an equation, sketching a graph, and interpreting both. This resource also includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Delivering the Mail:

This problem-solving task involves constructing a linear function and interpreting its parameters in a mail delivery context. It includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Distance Across the Channel:

This problem-solving task asks students to find a linear function that models something in the real world. After finding the equation of the linear relationship between the depth of the water and the distance across the channel, students have to verbalize the meaning of the slope and intercept of the line in the context of this situation. Commentary and illustrated solutions are included.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Teaching Idea

Now That is a Dense Graph:

In this activity, the density of ethanol is found by graphical means. In the second part, the density of sodium thiosulfate is found, also by graphical means. The values found are then analyzed statistically.

Type: Teaching Idea

MFAS Formative Assessments

Construction Function:

Students are asked to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities given two ordered pairs in context.

Deriving Lines - 1:

Students are asked to derive the general equation of a line containing the origin.

Deriving Lines - 2:

Students are asked to derive the general equation of a line with a y-intercept of (0, b).

Profitable Functions:

Students are asked to write a function to model a linear relationship given its graph.

Trekking Functions:

Students are asked to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities given a table of values.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades 6-8

Constructing Functions From Two Points:

Learn to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities and determine the slope and y-intercept given two points that represent the function with this interactive tutorial.

Constructing Linear Functions from Tables:

Learn to construct linear functions from tables that contain sets of data that relate to each other in special ways as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Scatterplots Part 4: Equation of the Trend Line:

Learn how to write the equation of a linear trend line when fitted to bivariate data in a scatterplot in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 4 in 6-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Constructing Functions From Two Points:

Learn to construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities and determine the slope and y-intercept given two points that represent the function with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Scatterplots Part 4: Equation of the Trend Line:

Learn how to write the equation of a linear trend line when fitted to bivariate data in a scatterplot in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 4 in 6-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Constructing Linear Functions from Tables:

Learn to construct linear functions from tables that contain sets of data that relate to each other in special ways as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Problem-Solving Tasks

DVD Profits, Variation 1:

In this task, students are asked to determine the unit price of a product under two different circumstances. They are also asked to generalize the cost of producing x items in each case.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Who Has the Best Job?:

This task asks the student to graph and compare two proportional relationships and interpret the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Students are also asked to write an equation and graph each scenario.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Modeling with a Linear Function:

The primary purpose of this task is to elicit common misconceptions that arise when students try to model situations with linear functions. This task, being multiple choice, could also serve as a quick assessment to gauge a class' understanding of modeling with linear functions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Comparing Speeds in Graphs and Equations:

This task provides the opportunity for students to reason about graphs, slopes, and rates without having a scale on the axes or an equation to represent the graphs. Students who prefer to work with specific numbers can write in scales on the axes to help them get started.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Chicken and Steak, Variation 1:

In this problem-solving task students are challenged to apply their understanding of linear relationships to determine the amount of chicken and steak needed for a barbecue, which will include creating an equation, sketching a graph, and interpreting both. This resource also includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Kimi and Jordan:

Students are asked to create and graph linear equations to compare the savings of two individuals. The purpose of the table in (a) is to help students complete (b) by noticing regularity in the repeated reasoning required to complete the table.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Video Streaming:

Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x,y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Chicken and Steak, Variation 2:

In this problem-solving task students are challenged to apply their understanding of linear relationships to determine the amount of chicken and steak needed for a barbecue, which will include creating an equation, sketching a graph, and interpreting both. This resource also includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Distance Across the Channel:

This problem-solving task asks students to find a linear function that models something in the real world. After finding the equation of the linear relationship between the depth of the water and the distance across the channel, students have to verbalize the meaning of the slope and intercept of the line in the context of this situation. Commentary and illustrated solutions are included.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

DVD Profits, Variation 1:

In this task, students are asked to determine the unit price of a product under two different circumstances. They are also asked to generalize the cost of producing x items in each case.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

High School Graduation:

This task provides a unique application of modeling with mathematics. Also, students often think that time must always be the independent variable and so may need some help understanding that one chooses the independent and dependent variable based on the way one wants to view a situation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Sore Throats, Variation 2:

Students graph proportional relationships and understand the unit rate as a measure of the steepness of the related line, called the slope. Students will also treat slopes more formally when they graph proportional relationships and interpret the unit rate as the slope of the graph.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Who Has the Best Job?:

This task asks the student to graph and compare two proportional relationships and interpret the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Students are also asked to write an equation and graph each scenario.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Baseball Cards:

This task could be put to good use in an instructional sequence designed to develop knowledge related to students' understanding of linear functions in contexts. Though students could work independently on the task, collaboration with peers is more likely to result in the exploration of a range of interpretations.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Battery Charging:

This task has students engaging in a simple modeling exercise, taking verbal and numerical descriptions of battery life as a function of time and writing down linear models for these quantities. To draw conclusions about the quantities, students have to find a common way of describing them.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Modeling with a Linear Function:

The primary purpose of this task is to elicit common misconceptions that arise when students try to model situations with linear functions. This task, being multiple choice, could also serve as a quick assessment to gauge a class' understanding of modeling with linear functions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Comparing Speeds in Graphs and Equations:

This task provides the opportunity for students to reason about graphs, slopes, and rates without having a scale on the axes or an equation to represent the graphs. Students who prefer to work with specific numbers can write in scales on the axes to help them get started.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Chicken and Steak, Variation 1:

In this problem-solving task students are challenged to apply their understanding of linear relationships to determine the amount of chicken and steak needed for a barbecue, which will include creating an equation, sketching a graph, and interpreting both. This resource also includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Kimi and Jordan:

Students are asked to create and graph linear equations to compare the savings of two individuals. The purpose of the table in (a) is to help students complete (b) by noticing regularity in the repeated reasoning required to complete the table.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Video Streaming:

Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x,y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Chicken and Steak, Variation 2:

In this problem-solving task students are challenged to apply their understanding of linear relationships to determine the amount of chicken and steak needed for a barbecue, which will include creating an equation, sketching a graph, and interpreting both. This resource also includes annotated solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Distance Across the Channel:

This problem-solving task asks students to find a linear function that models something in the real world. After finding the equation of the linear relationship between the depth of the water and the distance across the channel, students have to verbalize the meaning of the slope and intercept of the line in the context of this situation. Commentary and illustrated solutions are included.

Type: Problem-Solving Task