Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law and the American political system.

General Information
Number: SS.6.CG.1
Title: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law and the American political system.
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 6
Strand: Civics and Government

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

SS.6.CG.1.AP.1
Identify how democratic concepts developed in ancient Greece served as a foundation for the United States’ constitutional republic.
SS.6.CG.1.AP.2
Identify the influence of ancient Rome on the United States’ constitutional republic.
SS.6.CG.1.AP.3
Identify rule of law as a foundational principle of the U.S. government.
SS.6.CG.1.AP.4
Identify an example of civic leadership in ancient Greece and ancient Rome.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plans

The Israelites and the Rule of Law:

In this lesson, students will learn about key figures from Judaism (Abraham and Moses) as well as the practices of law in Israelite civilization.  Then, students will apply what they know about the rule of law in Mesopotamia and in ancient Egypt to determine how the Israelites compared to them.  Students will do this by comparing passages from Hammurabi’s Code to Jewish laws, then explaining the similarities and differences in how the rule of law was practiced in Mesopotamia, Israel, and Egypt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Roman Republic’s Influence on the U.S. Republic’s Democratic Principles:

In this lesson plan, students will create a representation of the government of Roman Republic’s contributions to the development of democratic principles that influenced the United States’ constitutional republic.

Type: Lesson Plan

Egyptian Achievements and the Rule of Law in Egypt:

In this lesson students will be introduced to the politics, society, and culture of ancient Egypt through guided notetaking.  Students will learn about the different achievements of ancient Egypt by reading small passages and answering questions across multiple stations, requiring students to work through cooperative learning.  Then, students will complete a brief exit slip addressing how the rule of law in Egypt compares to the rule of law in the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

Roman Republic: Contributions to Democratic Principles:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze the influences of the Roman Republic’s concepts of separation of power, rule of law, representative democracy, and civic duty on the United States’ constitutional republic.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Greece Achievement March Madness:

Students will have prior knowledge on the key figures of ancient Greece and the achievements of ancient Greece. Students will be gathering and applying their knowledge in this lesson, by choosing one component of ancient Greece (leader OR accomplishment) and work with small groups to compose an argument to why this had the most impact on future civilizations. Before students choose which item they think is the most impactful, the teacher will have a class discussion about what the question is specifically asking them to look for, that way all students are clear when they make their decision. The teacher will provide a check list to students to use that will highlight key factors to analyze as they debate why their choice is the best. Students will compete in a “March Madness Tournament” where they will go head to head with another achievement and have to prove why theirs was the most impactful. The class will vote on which of each bracket is the winner, and the winner will move onto the next round. At the end of the activity, the class will have found their “winner” for which achievement that they think was the most impactful to future societies.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Rule of Law Today:

In this lesson, students will use their knowledge of the rule of law and texts regarding the rule of law to show an understanding of the democratic concept. After reviewing what they know, students will create a physical or digital one-pager to show understanding of the concept, its origins, and what it means. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Rule of Law in Mesopotamia:

In this lesson, students will learn some information about the political structure of Mesopotamian civilizations.  Students will be introduced to Hammurabi and Hammurabi's Code.  Then, students will complete a group activity focusing on excerpts of Hammurabi's Code, then applying them to U.S. laws and principles independently.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: Individual Rights:

This is Lesson 6 in the unit using the text The Democratic Process. Student will focus on text evidence and debrief with a partner as they discuss Indivisual Rights and Responsibilites connecting the importance of the rule of law.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rule of Law in the United States:

This lesson will be about how the rule of law (a democratic concept from Ancient Greece and Rome) plays a major role in the United States. Students will look at examples of the rule of law, and analyze its importance in maintaining peace and equality in the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Leadership in the Roman Republic and the U.S. Republic:

In this lesson plan, students will compare the contributions, influence, and impact of three Roman leaders (Cincinnatus, Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus [a.k.a. “the Gracchus brothers”]) to two American leaders who demonstrated civic leadership (Martin Luther King, Jr. and George Washington).

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Greek Leaders Scavenger Hunt:

 “Who was the greatest leader in ancient Greece?’ The Teacher will have pre-printed posters of 8 different Greek key figures around the classroom. Students will be given a scavenger hunt handout. Students will go on a museum walk around the room to learn about each Greek figure and complete the handout. 

The students will return to their seats and be assigned small groups. Each group will be given a different leader to focus on. Students will create a “Superhero” Poster for their leader that they were given. A rubric will be given to students to make sure they include key facts and information about  their ancient Greek Leader. If there is time, students will share their posters. If not, posters will be hung in the classroom. Teacher (or peers) can grade each poster, using the rubric as a guide.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: People and the Government:

This is lesson 5 utilizing The Democratic Process by Mark Friedman. The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Participation- As Seen in Greece & Rome:

In this lesson plan, students will use primary sources to examine the influence of the Ancient Greeks and Romans on civic participation in the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: Bill of Rights - Rights and Responsibilities:

This is lesson #3 in the text unit series for The Democratic Process by Mark Friedman. The lesson will explore citizen’s individual rights, which rights were influenced by the ancient Greek and Roman democratic process, and current challenges to democracy. Students will read the text for background information, make personal and real-world connections, and research current challenges to democracy and how it impacts their lives.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Greece Accomplishments Impact Future Societies:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about major accomplishments of ancient Greece through a teacher guided lesson with a PowerPoint.  Students will take notes during the presentation on a graphic organizer provided to them. With a partner, they will look at each accomplishment and discuss ways that this has impacted future societies, including the United States. Students will do an exit ticket that reflects what they think the greatest accomplishment was of ancient Greece, and why. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Rule of Law in Rome vs the United States:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the concept of the rule of law in the Roman Republic and the US Republic by comparing the idea of “equality under the law” for all members of their societies.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rule of Law in Athens Greece & The U.S. Government:

Students will understand what the rule of law is and that it originated in ancient Greece and from the works of Aristotle. They will also be able to explain how the rule of law was used in Ancient Greece and how it is applied as a foundational principle in the U.S. Government. 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: Influences of Modern U.S. Democracy:

This is lesson #2 in the text unit series for The Democratic Process by Mark Friedman. Students will build on to the knowledge gained from the previous lesson. The lesson and activities will allow students to be more autonomous with their learning and apply knowledge of primary vs. secondary sources, reliable and unreliable sources, and facts and opinions to identify influences of ancient Greece and Rome on modern day U.S. Democratic Republic through a collaborative research project. Students will identify similarities and differences between ancient Greek and Roman democracies and identify their influences on modern day U.S. Democratic Republic.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

DEMOCRACY IN ANCIENT GREECE and THE U.S.:

Students will compare and contrast the government of the U.S. to that of Ancient Athens. They will be able to explain how Athens' political policies influenced the Founders when they were creating the U.S. government.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: Introduction to Ancient Greek and Roman Influence on Democracy:

This is lesson #1 in the text unit series for the book The Democratic Process by Mark Friedman. Students will be introduced to the concept of democratic principles and how ancient Greece and Rome influenced the American political process. Students will preview content specific vocabulary and identify the meaning of these words through context clues. Additionally, students will conduct a close read to locate textual evidence indicating how ancient Greece and Rome influenced our current U.S. political system.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Democratic Process: The Origins of Democracy and Republic:

This is lesson 4 for the text unit focused on The Democratic Process. Teachers can expect students to evaluate their understanding of democracy, the progression of individuals' freedoms and rights, along with the influence of the Founding Fathers. The point of this lesson is not just for students to collect textual evidence to support their original viewpoints. The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

The unit will prepare students to understand Greek and Roman influences on democracy in the United States, identify individual rights and freedoms, determine the difference between protected and unprotected rights, examine the rule of law, and evaluate the relevance of modern-day government. The activities in the unit will allow students the opportunity to participate in close reading, annotate text, and collaborate on research projects to gain a deeper understanding of democracy, government, and the rule of law.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rule of Law in the Ancient World:

Students will review the democratic concept of the rule of law. After reviewing as a class and with a supplemental text, students will create an advertisement of the rule of law explaining what it is and why it is important in the U.S.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Roman Republic vs. the U.S. Republic:

In this lesson plan, students will describe the government of the Roman Republic and compare it to the government of the United States.  The lesson will focus on breaking down the groups and branches of both governments to compare them.  Students will learn about the structure and functions of the Roman Republic’s branches (consuls/dictators, magistrates, senators, tribunes/assemblies) and the U.S. republic’s branches (executive, legislative, judicial).  Students will note the similarities and differences in their notes and complete a brief activity to bring it all together.

Type: Lesson Plan

Key Figures In Ancient Greece And Rome: Part 1:

The class will have a discussion on what characteristics a person should have to be seen as significant or important in history. Once, the class has come to a consensus on the skills necessary to be an important figure. Students will be taught a lesson on all of the major significant figures in ancient Greece. Students will be provided a graphic organizer to organize the information on each of these significant figures.

This is lesson 1 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and world history.

Type: Lesson Plan

Key Figures In Ancient Greece And Rome: Part 2:

Students will be taught a lesson on all of the major significant figures in ancient Rome. Students will be provided a graphic organizer to organize the information on each of these significant figures.

This is lesson 2 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and world history.

Type: Lesson Plan

Key Figures In Ancient Greece And Rome: Part 3:

Students will use their prior knowledge of significant figures in ancient Greek and Roman history from the two previous lessons to identify one figure they deem to be the most important. Students will design a poster, PowerPoint, or other multimedia presentation to display their knowledge of this individual. They will describe the figure's most crucial achievements and civic participation.

This is lesson 3 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and world history.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Greek Government Part 2:

Once students have identified and explained the democratic principles of government in ancient Greece in Part 1, they are ready to identify the ways in which ancient Greece influenced the development of democratic principles of government in the American colonies.

In this lesson, students will analyze ways in which the democratic principles developed in ancient Greece served as a foundation for the United States constitutional republic. Students will compare the democratic principles identified in part 1 to democratic principles in modern-day American government. In groups, students will collect information from various resources, combining the information onto one poster paper, to explain the similarities and differences between the political systems of ancient Greece and the current United States government.

Type: Lesson Plan

I Am the Greatest-Athenian Leadership:

This lesson will be taught during the Ancient Greece unit. While the lesson teaches about the civic accomplishments of Solon, Cleisthenes, Themistocles, and Pericles, students are asked to go one step further by selecting the most influential leader and justifying their selections.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Athenian Democracy: Part 1:

In the first part of this four-part lesson, students will collaborate to research an assigned topic to learn about the influence of Athenian democracy and its governing principles. Students will compile their research and cite their sources.  Students will then reflect on their learning and their collaboration.  In the subsequent parts of this lesson, students will continue collaborating to turn their research into a multimedia presentation and will finally demonstrate their learning individually by responding to a writing prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Athenian Democracy: Part 2:

In the second part of this four-part lesson, student groups will collaborate to use information they previously researched to produce a multimedia presentation on the influence of Athenian democracy and its government principles. Students will then reflect on their learning and their collaboration. In the subsequent parts of this lesson, students will deliver their presentation to the class and demonstrate their learning individually by responding to a writing prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Athenian Democracy: Part 3:

In the third part of this four-part lesson, student groups will collaborate to present a multimedia presentation based on their previous research on the influence of Athenian democracy and its government principles.  Students will then reflect on their learning and their collaboration.  In the final part of this lesson, students will deliver their presentation to the class and demonstrate their learning individually by responding to a writing prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Rome’s Republic: Part 4:

In the fourth and final part of this four-part lesson, students will individually use the research that they and their peers have conducted and presented to respond to a writing prompt. Students will need to analyze the influences of the ancient Roman Republic on America’s constitutional republic, paying special attention to Rome’s representative government and democratic principles.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Rome’s Republic: Part 3:

In the third part of this four-part lesson, student groups will collaborate to present a multimedia presentation based on their previous research on the influence of the Roman Republic and its government principles. Students will take notes on others’ topics when they are not presenting. Students will then reflect on their learning and their collaboration. In the final part of this lesson, students will demonstrate their learning individually by responding to a writing prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pnyx Hill: The Crumbling Foundation of Democracy (Part 2):

Students will use information related to weather patterns and the climate of Greece to explore weathering and erosion as potential contributing factors to the change in appearance of Pnyx Hill over time. They will then consider how similar factors could impact stone structures at the U.S. Capitol in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rule of Law: How Ancient Ideas Influence Laws in the United States :

The purpose of this lesson is to illustrate that the concept of “rule of law” not only appears in the U.S. government, but traces back to several ancient civilizations. Secondly, the lesson provides examples of “weak rule of law” and “strong rule of law” in both ancient civilizations and the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Greece or Rome? You Choose!:

In this lesson, students will review and evaluate what has been taught about the democratic concepts and governments of Greece and Rome in preparation for a Philosophical Chairs discussion. During this discussion, students will be tasked with deciding which civilization had the greatest influence on the United States’ constitutional republic.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pnyx Hill: The Crumbling Foundation of Democracy (Part 1):

Students will be introduced to Pnyx Hill in Athens, Greece, a historic political meeting site. They will explore how weathering and erosion have likely changed its appearance over time using scientific and creative thinking with models based on archaeological and historical information. After learning that Pnyx was the site of early democratic meetings, students will conduct a visual and structural comparison to our current Congressional halls in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient V. Modern Democratic Principles:

In this lesson plan, students will review the attributes and principles of democracy in ancient Athens and compare it to the democratic principles shown in the United States government today. Students have the opportunity to conduct in-depth research on each government to complete their Venn Diagram. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Government? Ancient Rome or Current Day United States?:

In this lesson, students will evaluate the government of the Roman Republic and its influence on the United States government. Students will then decide if they would rather live in ancient Rome or the current-day U.S. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Rome’s Republic: Part 1:

In the first part of this four-part lesson, students will collaborate to research an assigned topic to learn about the influence of the Roman Republic and its government principles. Students will compile their research and cite their sources. Students will then reflect on their learning and their collaboration. In the subsequent parts of this lesson, students will continue collaborating to turn their research into a multimedia presentation and will finally demonstrate their learning individually by responding to a writing prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Rome’s Republic: Part 2:

In the second part of this four-part lesson, student groups will collaborate to use information they previously researched to produce a multimedia presentation on the influence of the Roman Republic and its government principles. Students will then reflect on their learning and their collaboration. In the subsequent parts of this lesson, students will deliver their presentation to the class and demonstrate their learning individually by responding to a writing prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the influence? Part 3:

Students will build, share, and revise an interactive program in Scratch to present information about ancient Roman and ancient Greek leaders' influence on civic participation and governance in the ancient world, in this lesson plan.

This is part 3 of a 4 part series that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Influence of Ancient Rome:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze the influences of the political system of the ancient Roman republic on America’s modern constitutional republic while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow. A worksheet and assessment quiz give students opportunities to show what they have learned.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Influence of Ancient Greece:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze the influences of democratic concepts developed in ancient Greece on America’s modern constitutional republic while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow. A worksheet and assessment quiz give students opportunities to show what they have learned.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Greek Government Part 1:

Students will research ancient Greece to learn about democratic principles of government in ancient Greece using informational texts, websites, and other resources. Students will each complete their own KWHL graphic organizer, then work with a group to paraphrase information gathered from the texts, and create a group poster containing important facts/information learned about the ancient Greek democratic principles of government. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Leaders of Ancient Greece and Rome:

In this lesson plan, students will explain exemplary civic leadership and identify leaders from ancient Greece and Rome who exhibited good civic virtue.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Rule of Law in a U.S. Supreme Court Case:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about how the rule of law originated in the ancient world and how it has influenced our democracy by analyzing a U.S. Supreme Court case, Gideon v. Wainwright

Type: Lesson Plan

The Roman Republic’s Influence on the United States Constitution:

In this lesson plan, students will read about the ancient Roman Republic and how it influenced the United States’ constitutional republic. Students will then compare and contrast ancient Rome and modern-day United States regarding their political systems, government function, and the rule of law.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Civics Citations:

Students will analyze quotes from Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome that served as a foundation for civic leadership and virtue and compare them to ideas we have about democracy and civic participation today. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Ancient Leadership and Virtue:

This lesson introduces the concept of virtuous leadership, as it relates to key leaders in Ancient Greece and Rome.  Students will each take on the role of one of 5 leaders and fill in a graphic organizer about civic participation and governance.  Students will then collaborate on a paragraph to determine which of the men is the most virtuous leader.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the influence? Part 2:

Students will use their research on significant leaders of ancient Greece and ancient Rome to plan out each step of a Scratch program, in this lesson plan.

This is part 2 of a 4 part series that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the influence? Part 4:

Students will summarize and compare the contributions of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Marcus Aurelius, Pericles, Solon, and Cleisthenes to explain each person’s influence on civic participation and governance in the ancient world. Students will also explore how these leaders' ideas influenced modern day United States government.

This is part 4 of a 4 part series that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the influence? Part 1:

Students will research significant leaders of ancient Greece and ancient Rome to explore their influence on civic participation and governance in the ancient world, in this lesson plan. 

This is part 1 of a 4 part series that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rule of Law and Ancient Civilizations:

In this lesson, students will examine the rule of law and identify how Ancient Roman and Greek contributions impacted the United States by completing a KWL chart, a PowerPoint with guided notes, and an exit ticket assessment.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's All Greek to Me:

In this lesson, students will analyze how democratic concepts developed in ancient Greece served as a foundation for the United States’ constitutional republic.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Pnyx Hill: Government in the Open Air:

Explore how weathering and erosion may have affected Pnyx Hill, the ancient Greek democratic meeting place which influenced our modern government with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Greek and Latin Roots and Influences on U.S. Government:

Learn about the ancient Greek and Latin roots by separating them into their individual parts to determine meanings of words with this interactive tutorial. You'll also identify how some characteristics of the ancient Greek and Roman governments influenced the formation of the United States constitutional republic.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Influence of Ancient Greece: Part 3:

Compare and contrast the political systems and democratic principles that developed in ancient Greece with those of the modern United States.

This is Part 3 in a 3-part interactive tutorial series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Influence of Ancient Greece: Part 2:

Compare and contrast the political systems and democratic principles that developed in ancient Greece with those of the modern United States.

This is Part 2 in a 3-part series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Influence of Ancient Greece: Part 1:

In Part 1 of this interactive tutorial series, you'll learn about direct democracy as it developed in ancient Athens, Greece. In Parts 2 and 3, you'll compare and contrast the political systems and democratic principles that developed in Greece with those of the modern United States.

This is Part 1 in a 3-part series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Ideas

Grade 6 Civics Family Guide: Standard 1:

This Grade 6 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 1 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

One Pager Assessment: Ancient Greece and the United States:

In this assessment idea, students create a One Pager that identifies similarities and differences between the political systems of Ancient Greece and the United States and explains the impact of Ancient Greece on the American political process. A rubric and prep sheet (with answer key) are included.

Type: Teaching Idea

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Pnyx Hill: Government in the Open Air:

Explore how weathering and erosion may have affected Pnyx Hill, the ancient Greek democratic meeting place which influenced our modern government with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Greek and Latin Roots and Influences on U.S. Government:

Learn about the ancient Greek and Latin roots by separating them into their individual parts to determine meanings of words with this interactive tutorial. You'll also identify how some characteristics of the ancient Greek and Roman governments influenced the formation of the United States constitutional republic.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Influence of Ancient Greece: Part 3:

Compare and contrast the political systems and democratic principles that developed in ancient Greece with those of the modern United States.

This is Part 3 in a 3-part interactive tutorial series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Influence of Ancient Greece: Part 2:

Compare and contrast the political systems and democratic principles that developed in ancient Greece with those of the modern United States.

This is Part 2 in a 3-part series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Influence of Ancient Greece: Part 1:

In Part 1 of this interactive tutorial series, you'll learn about direct democracy as it developed in ancient Athens, Greece. In Parts 2 and 3, you'll compare and contrast the political systems and democratic principles that developed in Greece with those of the modern United States.

This is Part 1 in a 3-part series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.