Research 3   (#1700320)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop proficient knowledge and skills in the research process with emphasis on appropriate research design.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • research process
  • experimental, descriptive, and historical research
  • research design and methodology
  • legal and ethical issues in research
  • research questions and hypotheses
  • review of literature and other resources
  • data collection, analysis, and statistics
  • report formats, styles, and content
  • investigations
  • critical analysis of research

General Information

Course Number: 1700320
Abbreviated Title: RESEARCH 3
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Blasting Off with Active and Passive Voice:

Learn to distinguish between passive and active voice and how to revise sentences by changing them from passive voice to active voice in this interactive Space Race-themed tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Determining Point of View and Its Effect on a Text:

Read excerpts from E.B. White's moving personal essay "Once More to the Lake." In this tutorial, you will determine an author’s personal point of view and examine how it contributes to the beauty of a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part four of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and important details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part three of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and important details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part two of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4):

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial, you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part one of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

In the Driver's Seat!:

Learn how to identify the strengths and weaknesses of sources to use in your writing. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn to evaluate sources based on their relation to the audience, task, and purpose of your writing. You'll also practice determining whether potential sources are useful, relevant, and authoritative for your specific topic.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Practice analyzing an informational text using President Abraham Lincoln's 2nd Inaugural Address. In this interactive tutorial, you'll determine Lincoln's purpose in this historical speech. You'll also analyze how his specific word choice and use of parallel structure help support his purpose.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ecological Data Analysis:

See how data are interpreted to better understand the reproductive strategies taken by sea anemones with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ecology Sampling Strategies:

Examine field sampling strategies used to gather data and avoid bias in ecology research. This interactive tutorial features the CPALMS Perspectives video .

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Purpose and Rhetoric: Analyzing Civil Disobedience:

Learn about the rhetorical techniques used by Henry David Thoreau in his influential essay "Civil Disobedience." In this interactive tutorial, you'll cover some important background information on Thoreau and this classic essay, examine his purpose for writing, and identify his use of specific rhetorical techniques, including the use of allusions, metaphors, and rhetorical questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Best Left Unsaid: Determining Matters of Brevity and Clarity:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll hone your skills of analysis using excerpts of the essay "For Brevity and Clarity" by Ambrose Bierce. You will sharpen your skills identifying textual evidence to support what an author states directly and as well as draw inferences from the text. You'll then learn to distinguish what is stated through satire and determine what amiguities the author creates.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Clarence Darrow's Leopold and Loeb Speech:

Learn how to provide a complex analysis of two or more central ideas in a nonfiction text in this interactive tutorial. You will also analyze how the author’s central ideas develop over the course of the text and describe how they interact and build on one another. This tutorial utilizes an excerpt from the closing arguments by Clarence Darrow at the trial of Leopold and Loeb.

*Due to the subject matter of the Leopold and Loeb trial, this tutorial is recommended for a mature audience.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Question Quest:

Learn to distinguish between questions that can be answered by science and questions that science cannot answer. This interactive tutorial will help you distinguish between science and other ways of knowing, including art, religion, and philosophy.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Student Center Activity

Edcite: ELA Reading Grade 11:

Students can practice answering reading comprehension questions with engaging texts on the history of women's athletics. With an account, students can save their work and send it to their teacher when complete.

Type: Student Center Activity

Tutorials

How to Avoid Plagiarism:

This tutorial from the University of Maryland University College's Writing Center will help you understand and evaluate three ways to use source material: quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. The resource also provides guidelines to help you avoid even unintentional plagiarism mistakes. Once you complete the interactive exercises and answer every question on the final quiz correctly, you will receive a printable certificate of completion. Simply click on the hyperlink for the Interactive Version to begin.

Type: Tutorial

Proper Techniques for Research and Writing:

This tutorial provides you with step-by-step instructions for all aspects of writing a research paper and includes a comprehensive list of links to various style guides. Quizzes are also provided for self-assessment. Simply click start at the bottom of the home page to begin the presentation. If you want to only use portions of the tutorial, use the scroll down menu from the Jump To section located at the top of each presentation slide.

Type: Tutorial

Purdue OWL: Personal Statement:

In this vidcast from the Purdue Online Writing Lab, you will learn how to write your personal statement for your college application. Further, you will be able to write for a specific audience while adhering to particular guidelines for your format and style. Note- the vidcast may take a minute or two to load.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

Will an Ice Cube Melt Faster in Freshwater or Saltwater?:

With an often unexpected outcome from a simple experiment, students can discover the factors that cause and influence thermohaline circulation in our oceans. In two 45-minute class periods, students complete activities where they observe the melting of ice cubes in saltwater and freshwater, using basic materials: clear plastic cups, ice cubes, water, salt, food coloring, and thermometers. There are no prerequisites for this lesson but it is helpful if students are familiar with the concepts of density and buoyancy as well as the salinity of seawater. It is also helpful if students understand that dissolving salt in water will lower the freezing point of water. There are additional follow up investigations that help students appreciate and understand the importance of the ocean's influence on Earth's climate.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Inquiry and Ocean Exploration:

Ocean explorer Robert Ballard gives a TED Talk relating to the mysteries of the ocean, and the importance of its continued exploration.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
LAFS.1112.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

LAFS.1112.L.1.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

LAFS.1112.SL.1.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

LAFS.1112.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

LAFS.1112.WHST.1.1: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

LAFS.1112.WHST.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

The Florida Mathematical Practices should be incorporated as appropriate.