Theatre History and Literature 2 Honors   (#0400360)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

Students’ coursework focuses on the origins of western theatre from the Renaissance period to modern theatre. Students research and investigate the dramatic forms and practices of the times through the reading of plays and related literature. Public performances may serve as a resource for specific instructional goals. Students may be expected to attend one or more performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.

General Notes

Special Notes: 
Instructional Practices 
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students’ content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any reason. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning: 

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, textspecific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: https://cpalmsmediaprod.blob.core.windows.net/uploads/docs/standards/eld/si.pdf

General Information

Course Number: 0400360
Abbreviated Title: THEA HIST LIT 2 HON
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
Course Level: 3
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12
Graduation Requirement: Performing/Fine Arts

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Time for Leisure: Part Two:

Study "Leisure," a poem by Amy Lowell, to determine a theme of the poem and craft a thematic statement. At the end of this interactive tutorial, you'll use what you've learned throughout this two-part series to compare and contrast a theme in "Leisure" by Amy Lowell and a theme in "Leisure" by W. H. Davies and how these themes are developed.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Time for Leisure: Part One:

Learn to determine a theme of a poem, craft a thematic statement, and write a summary of the poem "Leisure" by W. H. Davies.  

This interactive tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In Part Two, you'll study "Leisure" by Amy Lowell to determine a theme of the poem and craft a thematic statement. By the end of this series, you will compare and contrast a theme in each poem and how these themes are developed. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Character Reborn in The Count of Monte Cristo -- Part Three:

Explain how Edmond Dantès’ overall transformation takes the plot in a new direction as you continue to examine how the main character is reborn from a prisoner into a newly freed man in a chapter from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.

You should complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Character Reborn in The Count of Monte Cristo -- Part Two:

As you continue to study a chapter from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, you'll examine how the main character, Edmond Dantès, is reborn from a prisoner into a newly freed man, identify his key character traits or strengths, and examine how he begins to transform as he works to secure his freedom.

This is part 2 of a three-part interactive tutorial series. Make sure to complete all three parts!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Character Reborn in The Count of Monte Cristo -- Part One:

Study a chapter from one of the most popular adventure stories of all time: The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In this interactive tutorial, you will identify key character traits or strengths of Edmond Dantès and determine how he draws on these strengths as he struggles to survive and avoid recapture.

This is part 1 of a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts!

  • Click HERE to launch Part Two. 
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Theme Is Developed in Short Poetry: Part Three:

Explore the poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay in this tutorial series. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In Part Three, you’ll study her poem "Recuerdo." You'll identify the topic of the poem, determine a theme of the poem, and explain how the theme is developed through specific words and phrases.

You're encouraged to complete the previous tutorials in this series before beginning Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Theme Is Developed in Short Poetry: Part Two:

Explore the poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay in this tutorial series. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In Part Two, you’ll study her short poem "Second Fig." You'll identify the topic of the poem, determine a theme of the poem, and explain how the theme is developed through specific words and phrases.

Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Theme Is Developed in Short Poetry: Part One:

Explore three short poems by the famous American poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and practice determining a theme for each poem in this three-part interactive tutorial series. In Part One, you’ll identify the topic of the short poem “First Fig.” Then, you’ll select words and phrases from the poem that address the topic of the poem. Finally, you’ll determine a theme in the short poem. By the end of this series, you should be able to explain how a theme is developed and supported by specific words and phrases throughout a short poem. 

Make sure to complete all three tutorials in this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part Two:

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this interactive tutorial series. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations.

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part Two:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth. 

This tutorial is the second in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part One:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth.  

This tutorial is the first in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Light and Darkness in Two Artistic Mediums:

Study the poem “We Grow Accustomed to the Dark” by Emily Dickinson and view the painting The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh to explain how each medium represents the subjects of light and darkness similarly and differently, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part Two:

Explore and explain multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol, which is set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. In this interactive tutorial, you'll also observe the culture of this society from multiple angles. 

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Before completing this tutorial, click here to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part One:

Learn multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol. In this two-part interactive tutorial, you’ll study excerpts from this story set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. By the end of this tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the multiple points of view within the story allows readers to observe the culture of this society from multiple angles.

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click here to launch Part Two

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

This is Part Two of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

This is Part One of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals. 

Click here to launch PART TWO.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including word meanings, subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and emotions connected to specific words. In this interactive tutorial, you will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part One:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great We: Analyzing Word Choice and Tone, Part 2:

Practice using textual details and connotative meanings to determine a speaker's/narrator's tone in this two-part interactive tutorial. You'll also analyze the impact of word choices on the meaning and tone of the text in excerpts from Ayn Rand's dystopian novella Anthem.

Make sure to complete Part One before you begin Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part four of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and important details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part three of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great We: Analyzing Word Choice and Tone, Part One:

Practice using textual details and connotative meanings to help you determine a speaker's/narrator's tone in this two-part interactive tutorial. You'll also analyze the impact of word choices on the meaning and tone of a text. This tutorial series features excerpts from Ayn Rand's dystopian novella Anthem.

Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Powerful Rhetoric: Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how speakers use rhetoric to achieve their purpose. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how speakers can achieve their purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. Using excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress," you'll analyze how speakers use rhetoric to make their case effectively.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Scout Learns Life Lessons: Analyzing How a Character Develops Themes:

Examine some of the various topics and themes present in the American classic To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from the novel and examine the development of the main character, Scout. You'll analyze how her words and actions help develop the important themes of the novel. You'll wrap up the tutorial by creating your own theme statement based on the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

In this tutorial, you'll practice identifying and analyzing how specific concepts are addressed in texts from two different time periods. The featured texts include the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. You'll practice analyzing the similarities and differences in how the two texts address certain concepts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Figure it Out! :

Examine the use of hyperbole and personification in the prologue of the novel The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying examples of hyperbole and personification within the text. You'll also learn how these two types of figurative language help authors convey their intended meaning.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Figurative Language in Poetry:

Learn to identify figurative language within poetry, including the use of similes, metaphors, and personification. In this interactive tutorial, we'll analyze William Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and William Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” to discover how figurative language contributes to the meaning of each poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Women at Work:

Learn to analyze the same topic represented in a variety of different mediums. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze both visual and written representations from the 1930s and 1940s. You will learn about some of the common composition features used in visual mediums, such as photographs or paintings. You'll learn the necessary steps to analyze and compare works represented in both visual and literary mediums.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing A Complex Character - Fahrenheit 451:

Analyze a complex character’s development in text excerpts from the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze how the main character is described and developed through his interaction with other characters.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Building Mystery, Tension and Suspense:

Learn to identify how authors create mystery, tension, and suspense within a story. In this interactive tutorial, you will learn how Richard Connell used exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to build tension and suspense in the short story "The Most Dangerous Game."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Greek Monsters on Parade:

Learn how to determine the theme of a fictional text using excerpts from Book 12 of Homer's The Odyssey. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to determine the theme of a text based on the characters and events of the story. You'll also practice distinguishing between themes and topics in a work of literature. Finally, you'll create your own theme statement for The Odyssey using details from the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Family Feud: Analyzing Plot Twists in "The Interlopers" (Part One):

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In Part One, you'll learn about the use of plot twists and their impact on a text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine two ways authors often create plot twists within a story. Reading excerpts from the short story "The Interlopers," you'll analyze and explain how the author creates several plot twists in the story by purposely setting and disrupting expectations for readers. 

After completing Part One, click HERE for Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

An Antihero of One's Own :

In this very engaging animated video from TEDed, you will learn about antiheroes. Antiheroes can be hard to distinguish from typical heroes. However, through this video you will be able to identify what an antihero is and understand how these complex characters with often unclear motivations play such important roles in great literature.

Type: Tutorial

What Makes a Hero?:

A great way to understand literature from epic poetry to literary series is to understand what makes a hero. In this very engaging animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the hero cycle, a common literary trope that can been found in many works like Harry Potter, The Hunger Games and even The Odyssey!

Type: Tutorial

The Art of the Metaphor:

In this animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the power of metaphors in your reading and in your writing. The video explores questions like: "How do metaphors help us better understand the world?", as well as "What makes a good metaphor?"

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.