LAFS.7.W.1.1

Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  1. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
  2. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 7
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1001040: M/J Language Arts 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001050: M/J Language Arts 2 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002010: M/J Language Arts 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1006010: M/J Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1007010: M/J Speech and Debate 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)
1009040: M/J Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1100000: M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700060: M/J Career Research and Decision Making (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700100: M/J Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Learning Strategies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7810012: Access M/J Language Arts 2  (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.1a: Produce an introduction that introduces the writer’s claims and acknowledges alternate or opposing claims.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.1b: Create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s claim.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.1c: Write arguments to support claims with logical reasoning and relevant evidence from credible sources.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.1d: Use words, phrases and clauses to link opinions and reasons and clarify relationship of ideas.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.1e: Maintain a consistent style and voice throughout writing (e.g., third person for formal style, accurate and efficient word choice, sentence fluency, voice should be active versus passive).
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.1f: Provide a concluding statement or section that supports and summarizes the argument presented.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Hard Work or Talent?:

The student will have read an informational text, “Expertise on Experts,” and analyzed the author’s explicit argument and supporting evidence in the previous task. The student will now take a position—either agreeing with the author or disagreeing with author. The student will complete a writing assignment in which, while maintaining a formal style, he or she will detail an argument with clear reasons and relevant evidence (from the text and/or with personal knowledge and experience).

Type: Formative Assessment

The Final Conclusion:

The student will have previously read the informational text “Expertise on Experts,” written an argument for or against the author’s claim, presented that argument with a small group, and evaluated other groups’ arguments. The student will now write a conclusion to his/her original argument, which will include a reflection on whether the group presentations changed his/her view on the topic (in which case he/she will revise his/her original argument) or confirmed his/her original position (in which case he/she will provide a concession to the opposition and a counterargument to confirm his/her position).

Type: Formative Assessment

Your Voice Counts:

The student will support his/her claim he/she developed in the Your Voice Counts Graphic Organizer from the previous task, LAFS.7.W.1.1a “Stake Your Claim,” with logical reasoning and relevant evidence to demonstrate an understanding of the topic in an e-mail to a legislator. Student will use credible sources.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Reflect It, Refract It, or Asorb It:

While working in groups, students will be provided various materials to design models that illustrate the refraction, reflection, and absorption of light.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sleep On It: A Close Reading Lesson:

In this lesson, students will conduct a close read of the article, "Why Teenagers Really do Need an Extra Hour in Bed" by Russell Foster (published on April 22, 2013 in Issue 2913 of NewScientist). For the first reading, students will focus on academic vocabulary. In the second reading, students will answer text-dependent questions to guide their comprehension of the article. In the third close reading, students will choose important facts in the article and cross-reference them with other articles to determine the validity and reliability of the evidence. Graphic organizers and worksheets, along with suggested keys and a writing rubric, have been provided. For the summative assessment, students will write a persuasive letter in which they make a claim regarding sleep and support it with textual evidence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: The Secrets Behind What You Eat:

This close reading exemplar uses an excerpt from Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma: The Secrets Behind What You Eat. The goal of this two day exemplar from Student Achievement Partners web resources is to give students the opportunity to use reading and writing habits to unpack Pollan's investigative journalism of industrial farms. By reading and rereading the passage closely combined with classroom discussion about it, students will identify why and how farming practices have changed, as well as identify Pollan's point of view on the subject. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will begin to appreciate investigative journalism, as well as question from where their food is coming.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: My Mother, the Scientist:

The goal of this three day exemplar from Student Achievement Partner web resources is to give students the opportunity to use reading and writing habits to absorb deep lessons from Charles Hirshberg's recollections of his mother. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussions about the text, students will identify how much his mother's struggles and accomplishments meant to both Hirshberg and the wider world. When combined with writing about the passage, and possibly pairing this exemplar study with Richard Feynman's memoir "The Making of a Scientist," students will discover how much they can learn from this mixed genre memoir/biography about what inspires life choices.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: As You Like It:

The goal of this two day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they've been practicing on a regular basis to unpack the meaning of Jacques' soliloquy from William Shakespeare's As You Like It. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will be able to understand the structure and purpose of this particular soliloquy and how it delves into universal themes regarding the human condition. When combined with writing about the soliloquy, students will discover how much they can learn from even a very short selection of a text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Car Shopping:

This MEA requires students to formulate a comparison-based solution to a problem involving finding the best decision on purchasing official vehicles for school district considering different aspects. Students are provided the context of the problem, a request letter from a client asking them to provide a recommendation, and data relevant to the situation. Students utilize the data to create a defensible model solution to present to the client.

Type: Lesson Plan

Disease "X" MEA:

Solve a problem as a team by designing a procedure to select the best approach to stop the spread of a virus throughout a population.

Type: Lesson Plan

Community and Me:

This is a lesson in understanding symbolism, reading comprehension, conducting Internet research, and writing arguments. Students will listen toThe Giving Tree, read "What Do Fish Have to Do With Anything" by Avi, and then conduct research to explore needs in their community. Students will then use text evidence compiled throughout the lesson activities to construct an essay to convince their reader as to whether or not community service is important.

Type: Lesson Plan

Say Cheese!:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from Simple Photography Classes to evaluate several digital cameras and help them decide which one they should purchase.

Type: Lesson Plan

Along for the Ride!:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from Cut It Out Section of the Building and Grounds Maintenance Department of a school district to evaluate several lawn tractor models and help them decide which unit they should purchase.

Type: Lesson Plan

Batteries Included:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from E-Z Go Taxi Cab Service to evaluate several batteries and help them decide which battery they should purchase.

Type: Lesson Plan

Where in the world?:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from Always On Time Delivery Service to evaluate several GPS units and help them decide which unit they should purchase.

Type: Lesson Plan

Clean Park - Environmental MEA:

The environmental conditions in parks can influence the availability of food, light, space, and water and hence affect the growth and development of animals. It can become worse and lead to endangerment and extinction of various species. The following are areas in nature that can be affected: lakes, plants, animal life in and outside of water and many more.

Type: Lesson Plan

Best School for Kevin:

In this MEA, the students will compare data to decide which school would be the best for a couple's son who is transferring into the county.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analysis of a Political News Article:

Students will read a news article on an immigration policy being presented by the President just prior to election. Students will determine the essential message of the article, examine the information presented to determine author intent, and write a written response citing evidence from the text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: "Unbroken" and "Farewell to Manzanar":

As students will have previous exposure to the historical themes and factual information about the attacks on Pearl Harbor, the United States involvement in WWII, and the internment of Japanese in camps throughout the western United States, this lesson exemplar will allow students to participate in critical discussion of two stories that illuminate important, yet divergent, experiences of war and conflict. This lesson exemplar will push students to think critically about the experience of wartime as felt by both soldiers and civilians as they navigated specific trials that were a part of their direct or peripheral involvement in WWII.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sustain Me:

The purpose of this MEA is to have students explore human impact on Earth as well as to look at workable solutions that they can implement in order to minimize this impact. This MEA focuses on water sustainability as defined by the EPA and requires that the students explore several Low Impact Development (LID) options to implement at school.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

CER: Writing a Great Paragraph:

Learn how to write a great "CER" paragraph that includes a claim, evidence, and reasoning with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Jeans for Learning: Argumentative Writing:

Learn how to write a strong introduction for an argumentative essay as you complete this interactive tutorial.  When you master argumentative writing, you can convince your reader to believe whatever you want them to believe!

Learn how to identify and write strong argumentative claims.

You’ll practice brainstorming and selecting the evidence that best supports an argumentative claim.

You’ll learn how to identify and write great grabbers to hook your reader’s attention and make them want to read your writing,

And finally, you’ll write a complete introduction using all that you’ll learn.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Idea

Finding Science through Reading Science Fiction:

In this ReadWriteThink.org lesson, students will be able to explore the genre of science fiction, while learning more about the science integrated into the plot of the story using nonfiction texts and resources. First, students define the science fiction genre and then read and discuss science fiction texts. Next, they conduct research to find science facts that support or dispute the science included in the plot of the science fiction book they read. Students then revisit their definition of the genre and revise based on their reading. Finally, students complete a project that examines the science fiction genre in relation to real-world science concepts and topics. This lesson plan makes the connections between the worlds in science fiction and students' real world explicit by asking them to explore the underlying science that supports the fictional world and considering its relationship to the real science in today's society.

Type: Teaching Idea

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Petey: Overcoming Adversity:

Petey is the story of a man who was born with cerebral palsy in 1922 and lived in institutions his entire life. In this unit, students will learn about important challenges individuals with severe disabilities may face and the importance of regarding persons with disabilities with respect and dignity as they cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text, analyze how particular elements of a story interact, and write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Along for the Ride!:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from Cut It Out Section of the Building and Grounds Maintenance Department of a school district to evaluate several lawn tractor models and help them decide which unit they should purchase.

Batteries Included:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from E-Z Go Taxi Cab Service to evaluate several batteries and help them decide which battery they should purchase.

Best School for Kevin:

In this MEA, the students will compare data to decide which school would be the best for a couple's son who is transferring into the county.

Car Shopping:

This MEA requires students to formulate a comparison-based solution to a problem involving finding the best decision on purchasing official vehicles for school district considering different aspects. Students are provided the context of the problem, a request letter from a client asking them to provide a recommendation, and data relevant to the situation. Students utilize the data to create a defensible model solution to present to the client.

Clean Park - Environmental MEA:

The environmental conditions in parks can influence the availability of food, light, space, and water and hence affect the growth and development of animals. It can become worse and lead to endangerment and extinction of various species. The following are areas in nature that can be affected: lakes, plants, animal life in and outside of water and many more.

Disease "X" MEA:

Solve a problem as a team by designing a procedure to select the best approach to stop the spread of a virus throughout a population.

Say Cheese!:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from Simple Photography Classes to evaluate several digital cameras and help them decide which one they should purchase.

Sustain Me:

The purpose of this MEA is to have students explore human impact on Earth as well as to look at workable solutions that they can implement in order to minimize this impact. This MEA focuses on water sustainability as defined by the EPA and requires that the students explore several Low Impact Development (LID) options to implement at school.

Where in the world?:

This resource provides a Model-Eliciting Activity where students will analyze a real-world scenario to solve a client's problem and provide the best possible solution based on a logically justified process. The students will consider a request from Always On Time Delivery Service to evaluate several GPS units and help them decide which unit they should purchase.

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

CER: Writing a Great Paragraph:

Learn how to write a great "CER" paragraph that includes a claim, evidence, and reasoning with this interactive tutorial.

Jeans for Learning: Argumentative Writing:

Learn how to write a strong introduction for an argumentative essay as you complete this interactive tutorial.  When you master argumentative writing, you can convince your reader to believe whatever you want them to believe!

Learn how to identify and write strong argumentative claims.

You’ll practice brainstorming and selecting the evidence that best supports an argumentative claim.

You’ll learn how to identify and write great grabbers to hook your reader’s attention and make them want to read your writing,

And finally, you’ll write a complete introduction using all that you’ll learn.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

CER: Writing a Great Paragraph:

Learn how to write a great "CER" paragraph that includes a claim, evidence, and reasoning with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Jeans for Learning: Argumentative Writing:

Learn how to write a strong introduction for an argumentative essay as you complete this interactive tutorial.  When you master argumentative writing, you can convince your reader to believe whatever you want them to believe!

Learn how to identify and write strong argumentative claims.

You’ll practice brainstorming and selecting the evidence that best supports an argumentative claim.

You’ll learn how to identify and write great grabbers to hook your reader’s attention and make them want to read your writing,

And finally, you’ll write a complete introduction using all that you’ll learn.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.