MAFS.912.F-IF.1.3

Recognize that sequences are functions, sometimes defined recursively, whose domain is a subset of the integers. For example, the Fibonacci sequence is defined recursively by f(0) = f(1) = 1, f(n+1) = f(n) + f(n-1) for n ≥ 1.

General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 912
Domain-Subdomain: Functions: Interpreting Functions
Cluster: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Cluster: Understand the concept of a function and use function notation. (Algebra 1 - Major Cluster) (Algebra 2 - Supporting Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
    assessed with:

    MAFS.912.F-LE.1.2

Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question:

    A team of scientists periodically measures and records to volume of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean. The scientists use the sequence shown to report the volume of ice, in cubic kilometers, every 5 years from 1980 to 2015, where begin mathsize 12px style V subscript 0 end style represents the volume of ice in 1980 and begin mathsize 12px style V subscript 1 end style represents the volume of ice in 1985.

    begin mathsize 12px style V subscript 0 end style= 25,354.67

    begin mathsize 12px style V subscript 1 equals V subscript n minus 1 end subscript minus 1 comma 290.12 end style

    Click on each blank to complete the statements.

    The variable n represents _______________. The domain for begin mathsize 12px style V subscript n end style is ___________________. begin mathsize 12px style V subscript n end style can also be written ______________.

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: ETC: Editing Task Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1200310: Algebra 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200320: Algebra 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200370: Algebra 1-A (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200400: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 9-12 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7912080: Access Algebra 1A (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond (current))
1200315: Algebra 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200375: Algebra 1-A for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
7912100: Fundamental Algebraic Skills (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
7912075: Access Algebra 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.912.F-IF.1.AP.3a: Recognize that the domain of a sequence is a subset of the integers. .

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 3 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 2 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Recursive Sequences:

Students are asked to find the first five terms of a sequence defined recursively, explain why the sequence is a function, and describe its domain

Type: Formative Assessment

Which Sequences Are Functions?:

Students are asked to determine if each of two sequences is a function and to describe its domain, if it is a function.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plan

The Towers of Hanoi: Experiential Recursive Thinking:


This lesson is about the Towers of Hanoi problem, a classic famous problem involving recursive thinking to reduce what appears to be a very large and difficult problem into a series of simpler ones.  The learning objective is for students to begin to understand recursive logic and thinking, relevant to computer scientists, mathematicians and engineers.   The lesson is experiential, in that each student will be working with her/his own Towers of Hanoi manipulative, inexpensively obtained.  There is no formal prerequisite, although some familiarity with set theory and functions is helpful.  The last three sections of the lesson involve some more formal concepts with recursive equations and proof by induction, so the students who work on those sections should probably be level 11 or 12 in a K-12 educational system.  The lesson has a Stop Point for 50-minute classes, followed by three more segments that may require a half to full additional class time.  So the teacher may use only those segments up to the Stop Point, or if two class sessions are to be devoted to the lesson, the entire set of segments.  Supplies are modest, and may be a set of coins or some washers from a hardware store to assemble small piles of disks in front of each student, each set of disks representing a Towers of Hanoi manipulative.  Or the students may assemble before the class a more complete Towers of Hanoi at home, as demonstrated in the video.  The classroom activities involve attempting to solve with hand and mind the Towers of Hanoi problem and discussing with fellow students patterns in the process and strategies for solution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Text Resource

Patterns and Structures:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Patterns are an integral part of any system. One of the main functions of mathematics is to find patterns and create functions that generalize these patterns. There are many situations where patterns emerge and can be described by mathematics. For example, Fibonacci sequences can describe natural phenomena, quantic equations can describe repeated cases of symmetry, and there are even patterns in the occurrence of prime numbers.

Type: Text Resource

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Sample Algebra 1 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP:

This sample Algebra 1 CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the Algebra 1 Course. The units and standards are customizable and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, worksheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes rows that automatically filter and display Math Formative Assessments System tasks, E-Learning Original Student Tutorials and Perspectives Videos that are aligned to the standards, available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample Algebra 1 CMAP, its features and customizability by watching the following video:

 
 
 

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please click here

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx 

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Video/Audio/Animation

MIT BLOSSOMS - Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations :

This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of difference equations.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

Fractal Tool:

Students investigate shapes that grow and change using an iterative process. Fractals are characterized by self-similarity, smaller sections that resemble the larger figure. From NCTM's Illuminations.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

MFAS Formative Assessments

Recursive Sequences:

Students are asked to find the first five terms of a sequence defined recursively, explain why the sequence is a function, and describe its domain

Which Sequences Are Functions?:

Students are asked to determine if each of two sequences is a function and to describe its domain, if it is a function.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Video/Audio/Animation

MIT BLOSSOMS - Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations :

This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of difference equations.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

Fractal Tool:

Students investigate shapes that grow and change using an iterative process. Fractals are characterized by self-similarity, smaller sections that resemble the larger figure. From NCTM's Illuminations.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.