SC.5.E.7.1

Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 5
Body of Knowledge: Earth and Space Science
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Big Idea: Earth Systems and Patterns - Humans continue to explore the interactions among water, air, and land. Air and water are in constant motion that results in changing conditions that can be observed over time.
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: MC item(s)
  • Also Assesses
    SC.5.E.7.2
    Recognize that the ocean is an integral part of the water cycle and is connected to all of Earth’s water reservoirs via evaporation and precipitation processes.

  • Clarification :
    Students will identify and/or explain the parts of the water cycle.

    Students will identify the states of water associated with each part of the water cycle and/or explain the phase changes that occur as water moves from one part of the water cycle to another.

    Students will identify and/or describe the role of the ocean in the water cycle.
  • Content Limits :
    Items will not address or assess transpiration, infiltration, or percolation as processes of the water cycle.

    Items assessing the phases of water are limited to a water cycle context.
  • Stimulus Attributes :
    Scenarios referring to the water cycle will not use the term reservoir.
  • Response Attributes :
    None specified
  • Prior Knowledge :
    Items may require the student to apply science knowledge described in the NGSSS from lower grades. This benchmark requires prerequisite knowledge from SC.2.E.7.1, SC.2.E.7.2, SC.2.E.7.3, and SC.2.P.8.4.
Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question: A model of the water cycle was made using an aquarium with a glass cover, a container of ice cubes, water, and a lamp.

    Which part of the water cycle causes the water droplets to form on the glass cover?

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020060: Science - Grade Five (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7720060: Access Science Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.5.E.7.In.1: Label the state of water in each stage of the water cycle.
SC.5.E.7.Su.1: Match different states of water (liquid and solid) to changes in temperature.
SC.5.E.7.Pa.1: Distinguish between water as a liquid and ice as a solid.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Water Wonders:

The water cycle is the system by which Earth's fixed amount of water is collected, purified, and distributed from the environment to living things and back to the environment. Through a game and an experiment, this activity will introduce students to the various steps of the water cycle and will help them make connections between the water cycle and all living things.

Type: Lesson Plan

Model Magic! Water Cycle Model:

Students will study how water cycles through the atmosphere. Students will create a graphic organizer labeling all the parts of the water cycle including evaporation, condensation, precipitation, transpiration & runoff. Then students will work with a lab partner (team) to create their own model of the water cycle using a plastic container to show all parts of the cycle.

Type: Lesson Plan

Water Cycle:

This lesson teaches the water cycle through class experiments/ displays, videos and diagrams.

Type: Lesson Plan

Build Your Own Water Cycle Model:

In this lesson, students will investigate the steps of the water cycle. They will describe each step of the water cycle and the state of matter that the water is in during each step. Students will recognize that the sun is a crucial part of the water cycle and that the water's state of matter can go back and forth. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the water cycle by designing and building their own water cycle model.

Type: Lesson Plan

Save the Plants!:

This MEA asks the students to design a system to water plants using rain water. Students apply their knowledge of the water cycle and grade specific content vocabulary to label and justify their design. Students also use context clues and dictionary skills to define the term permeability.

Type: Lesson Plan

Water Cycle in a Sack:

In this lesson students will construct models of the water cycle, draw a diagram, and write an explanatory essay on the stages of the water cycle.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why Does Rain Fall?:

Ever wonder why rain falls to the Earth's surface? Where does it go after it falls? Will we ever run out of water? Students encounter these questions and more everyday as they observe natural occurrences happening in their back yard. This lesson will help you to create a simulation of the water cycle with a few simple tools and a probing conversation between two friends.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cycling Water Through the Environment:

Water plays a major role in the planet's weather and climate, as well as nourishes people, plants, and animals; it is a crucial ingredient for life on Earth. Earth's natural mechanism for transporting, cleansing, and recycling water between the surface and the atmosphere is referred to as the water cycle. This lesson has students recognize water's different forms and where it exists in the environment. The class will discuss and perform experiments, modeling the water cycle and exploring how salt water can be distilled into fresh water.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Water Cycle - Back and Forth:

This lesson features a companion lesson entitled The Water Cycle - Back and Forth (part 2) published on CPALMS. In this first lesson, students create a model (drawing) after learning the parts of the water cycle. The drawing will be in their science notebooks and will be something they will build on in future lessons. At the end of the unit they will display larger finished models. Vocabulary words are defined and connected to a model of melting ice in a water bottle.

Type: Lesson Plan

Water, Water Everywhere! Research the Water Cycle:

Water, Water Everywhere! Research the Water Cycle asks students to conduct their own research on the water cycle (hydrologic cycle). Working collaboratively in small groups, students will research and write about the relationships between stages in the water cycle and the three states of matter relating to water. After completing this lesson, students will be prepared to create a model of the water cycle.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

The Water Cycle Part 2: Water in the Atmosphere:

Learn how water moves into the atmosphere as it moves through the water cycle. This is part 2 of a three-part interactive tutorial series. 

Click to open part 1

Click HERE to open part 3 (Coming Soon)

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Water Cycle Part 1: Sources of Water:

Explore different sources of water as it travels through Earth's water cycle.  Discover the importance of the oceans and other water sources as you follow water's journey in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Modeling the Everglades with Mathematics:

Dr. Tom Van Lent and Rajendra Paudel describe how hydrologic modeling is used to evaluate environmental conditions in the Everglades.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Project

A Drop Of Water:

Students will research the parts of the water cycle and create a visual display and final product on what they know about the water cycle.

Type: Project

Teaching Ideas

The Water Cycle:

The representation is a detailed, labeled diagram of the water cycle. Included in the representation are the major concepts of evaporation, precipitation and ground infiltration, as well as more advanced ideas such as transpiration and water storage. Above and below the diagram are several paragraphs that provide an introduction to the water cycle, a quick summary of the parts of the water cycle and information about global water distribution.

Type: Teaching Idea

Water Cycle Song:

This is a great song to help students remember the water cycle. My students love to sing this song. I use it throughout the year, especially when we have a little extra time before lunch or changing classes.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resources

The Water Cycle Adventure:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article walks the reader through the water cycle, from the point of view of a drop of water.

Type: Text Resource

Water Cycle:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article discusses the steps in the water cycle.

Type: Text Resource

Video/Audio/Animations

Solar Still Part 1: Salt Water:

The process that moves water around Earth is known as the water cycle. I this ZOOM-adapted video clip, the cast uses a homemade solar still to separate pure water from a saltwater mixture, mimicing this natural process.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

The Hydrologic Cycle:

The hydrologic cycle describes how water is perpetually recycled, continuously traveling between Earth's surface and the atmosphere through five main processes: condensation, precipitation, infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration. This NASA-adapted interactive resource explores the steps of the water cycle in a computer model.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Save the Plants!:

This MEA asks the students to design a system to water plants using rain water. Students apply their knowledge of the water cycle and grade specific content vocabulary to label and justify their design. Students also use context clues and dictionary skills to define the term permeability.

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades K-8

The Water Cycle Part 1: Sources of Water:

Explore different sources of water as it travels through Earth's water cycle.  Discover the importance of the oceans and other water sources as you follow water's journey in this interactive tutorial.

The Water Cycle Part 2: Water in the Atmosphere:

Learn how water moves into the atmosphere as it moves through the water cycle. This is part 2 of a three-part interactive tutorial series. 

Click to open part 1

Click HERE to open part 3 (Coming Soon)

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

The Water Cycle Part 2: Water in the Atmosphere:

Learn how water moves into the atmosphere as it moves through the water cycle. This is part 2 of a three-part interactive tutorial series. 

Click to open part 1

Click HERE to open part 3 (Coming Soon)

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Water Cycle Part 1: Sources of Water:

Explore different sources of water as it travels through Earth's water cycle.  Discover the importance of the oceans and other water sources as you follow water's journey in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Solar Still Part 1: Salt Water:

The process that moves water around Earth is known as the water cycle. I this ZOOM-adapted video clip, the cast uses a homemade solar still to separate pure water from a saltwater mixture, mimicing this natural process.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.