Cluster 1: Text Types and Purposes

General Information
Number: LAFS.6.W.1
Title: Text Types and Purposes
Type: Cluster
Subject: English Language Arts
Grade: 6
Strand: Writing Standards

Related Standards

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1a
Write an introduction that introduces the writer’s claim within an argument.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1b
Create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s claim.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1c
Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence from credible sources.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1d
Use words, phrases and clauses to link claims and reasons.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1e
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows the argument presented.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1f
Distinguish claims presented orally or in writing that are supported by reasons and claims that are not.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2a
Organize ideas, concepts and information (e.g., using definition, classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect).
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2b
Provide an introduction that includes context/background information establishing a central idea or focus about a topic.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2c
Develop the topic (add additional information related to the topic) with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations or other information and examples.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2d
Include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables) and multimedia when useful to promote reading understanding.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2e
Use transitional words, phrases and clauses that connect ideas and create cohesion within writing.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2f
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2g
Maintain a consistent style and voice throughout writing.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.2h
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and summarizes the information presented.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3a
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3b
Organize ideas and event so that they unfold naturally.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3c
When appropriate use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3d
Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3e
Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3f
Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.3g
Use figurative language appropriately, including similes and metaphors.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Formative Assessments

Saving the Best for Last :

The student will revise a piece of his/her own narrative writing by adding a strong conclusion that follows a narrated experience/event.

Type: Formative Assessment

The Road Not Taken: Writing an Introduction:

The student will read a poem and write an introduction to an essay about the poem.

Type: Formative Assessment

What Does This Place Sound Like, Feel Like, Look Like? :

The student will revise a piece of his/her own narrative writing by adding sensory language to convey the setting or location of an event in the story.

Type: Formative Assessment

The Power of Dialogue :

The student will revise a piece of his/her own narrative writing by including dialogue to enrich the experiences, events, and/or characters in the piece.

Type: Formative Assessment

Can You Write a Concluding Statement?:

The student will write a concluding statement or section from his or her own informational essay OR will write a concluding statement or section from a passage provided.

Type: Formative Assessment

Give Me the Facts - Just the Facts :

The student will read the historical journal and information from a social studies textbook or other source and identify relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, and other information and examples to write an informational/explanatory text that will examine the landscape of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon.

Type: Formative Assessment

Specify Your Vocabulary and Be Precise:

The student will read the historical journal and information from a Social Studies textbook or other source and identify domain-specific vocabulary and precise language in the texts. The student will then define the words/phrases and write an original sentence for each word using context clues to inform about or explain the topic.

Type: Formative Assessment

For It or Against It – Give Me the Facts!:

The student will support his/her claim on a given topic with evidence from credible sources by writing three to four paragraphs. The student will use evidence collected on the “For It or Against It—Tell Me Why” graphic organizer to write the body paragraphs.

Type: Formative Assessment

For It or Against It – I’ve Proved My Point!:

The student will wrap up his or her argument by writing a conclusion paragraph. The student will reiterate what he or she stated in the thesis statement and incorporate a brief summary of the main points made throughout the paper.

Type: Formative Assessment

For It or Against It – Tell Me Why?:

The student will write an argument on a given topic. The student will read one to three sources of informational texts on that topic in order to generate reasons and to gather evidence to support his/her claim(s). The student will organize his/her findings on a directed-note taking graphic organizer. The student will introduce his/her argument and claims through a thoroughly written introductory paragraph. The student will support his/her position on the topic with at least three claims.

Type: Formative Assessment

For It or Against It – Make It Flow:

The student will revise writing to bridge the relationship among his or her claims and reasons by adding words, phrases, and clauses to his or her writing.

Type: Formative Assessment

Is Your Claim on Thin Ice? :

The student will read an informational text and highlight text to identify the author’s claim and relevant supportive text information that serves as evidence of the claim. Using a graphic organizer, the student will record the author’s claims and list the supportive evidence. The student will use the graphic organizer information to plan, organize, and present his or her position in writing about the strength of the author’s claim and supportive text evidence for the claim.

Type: Formative Assessment

Narrative Fun:

The student will write a narrative to develop a real or imagined experience or event. First, the student will create a comic strip to organize the series of events in a logical order. The student will develop characters/narrator, setting, problem/conflict, and resolution through the comic strip. The student will then use the comic strip to guide his/her writing of a narrative that unfolds to take the reader through the selected event naturally and logically.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Gr. 6 Lesson 3-Florida’s Limestone–Tums for Our Water and Soil :

Students will conduct a controlled experiment to determine the effect Florida's limestone has on the pH levels of Florida's water and soil. Students will compare limestone's effect to that of other rocks and minerals found naturally in Florida. At the end of this investigation, students should be able to articulate the effect limestone has on the pH of water in Florida, the importance of this phenomenon, and a basic understanding of the process by which limestone affects pH levels in water.

Type: Lesson Plan

Climate and Careers!:

Students will explore chosen outdoor careers and how the careers connect to certain climates based on temperature and precipitation. The guiding question states "How might you use evidence from weather data and dot plot displays to allow you to identify which location's climate would be best for your career and why?" Students will collect data online and display the data using dot plots on posters with analysis using the mean. Students will engage in collaboration throughout. A power point is included with all necessary resources.

Type: Lesson Plan

Narrative Writing: A Lesson Learned the Hard Way in “Thank You, M’am”:

In this lesson, students will read Langston Hughes’ short story, “Thank You, M’am”, analyzing the impact of plot and character in developing the story’s theme. After reading the story, students will use details gathered from the text to write a narrative that predicts/portrays what would occur if the characters met again.

Type: Lesson Plan

Narrative Writing: Climate Change and “The Sand Castle”:

In this lesson, students will view a video about climate change, read and analyze a short story depicting the effects of climate change, and write their own narratives sending a message to their readers about the impact of climate change.

Type: Lesson Plan

Conduction, Convection, Radiation! What's the Breeze Now?:

In this lesson students will be exploring how radiant energy causes the temperature of different Earth materials to rise at different rates. Students will observe that this difference in temperature has direct effect on air movement. Students will reach to conceptual understanding of future trends.

Type: Lesson Plan

Views on Freedom: Part 3 of 3:

This final lesson in a three-lesson unit guides students carefully through the entire process of writing an essay based on the concept of freedom and using text evidence from four sources - the poems "Words Like Freedom"/"Refugee in America" and "Sympathy," the nonfiction text "Nelson Mandela Reflects on Working toward Freedom" and the folk tale "The People Could Fly." The lesson consists of a review of the two previous lessons in the series, four days of organizing thoughts and getting teacher and peer feedback on each step in the essay, and producing a final copy. An assignment sheet, detailed organizer for students who need extra support, and rubric are all provided. Students must have completed lessons #1 and #2 in this series to complete this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Smooth Smoothie:

Students will analyze data to decide what blender to use, what size cups for adults, total ingredients needed, and create a variable that supports how many amounts and the total ounces of smoothies made.

Type: Lesson Plan

"The Scribe": A Close Reading Lesson:

This close reading lesson focuses on identifying theme in the short story, "The Scribe" by Kristin Hunter. The lesson incorporates information on the Great Depression and allows students to make a cross-curricular connection between history and language arts. Students will define unfamiliar words using context clues, analyze story elements, and identify stated and implied themes.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Close Reading: An Excerpt from A Corner of the Universe:

In this lesson, students will conduct three close readings of an excerpt from A Corner of the Universe by Ann M. Martin. This lesson will engage students in a thought-provoking text that will challenge students to explore how a character's point of view can influence how events are described and shape a text. In conjunction with point of view, students will have opportunities to use context clues to define selected vocabulary words within the text. Upon completion of the close reading activities, students will practice their narrative writing skills by creating an original dialogue between the main character and her mother. A rubric specific to the writing task is included along with guided reading questions and sample responses.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Picture's Worth A Thousand Words: From Image to Detailed Narrative:

This two-day lesson, "A Picture's Worth A Thousand Words: From Image to Detailed Narrative," by Traci Gardner, is provided by ReadWriteThink.org, a website developed by the International Reading Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, with support from the Verizon Foundation.

In the lesson, students view an image that tells a story and brainstorm the possible event or situation the image illustrates. Each student then writes a narrative from the point of view of one of the characters, revealing the character's thoughts/feelings and the events that led up to the image or the events that will follow.

Type: Lesson Plan

Philosophical Chairs with Tom Sawyer:

In this lesson, students will close read a short section (chapter 23) of Twain"s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, gathering and organizing evidence to collaboratively defend a position with textual support in a debate-style activity. They will use this experience to assist with the creation of an extended written paragraph addressing the development of theme in Twain"s novel, this time citing evidence in writing to support their assertions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Decisions, Decisions!:

Use tables, graphs and models to represent, analyze and solve real world problems.

Type: Lesson Plan

Choose Your Own Adventure: A Hypertext Writing Experience:

This lesson prepares students for a summative assessment in which they co-author a narrative modeled after Choose Your Own Adventure stories. After reading one or more adventure stories, the teacher will facilitate discussion of the second person point of view while helping students identify the story's literary elements including setting, character, plot, and conflict. Students will then meet in literature circles to brainstorm ideas for their own group Choose Your Own Adventure story. Web authorizing software needed if wanting to post on the web. Groups create their own websites. Parts of the story can be hyperlinked to each other and uploaded to the internet. Graphic organizers, links to online Choose Your Own Adventure-style stories, and a rubric for students to conduct self-assessment are provided in this web resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Vacation:

The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with the opportunity to solve real-world and mathematical problems using add, subtraction, multiply, and divide multi-digit decimals using the standard algorithm for each operation. They will write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

Type: Lesson Plan

I want a cell phone:

Students develop a procedure to select a cell phone based on qualities they think their parents value in a cell phone. Students present their solution in writing to a marketing company, who wishes to use the results to market cell phones to parents of elementary students.

Type: Lesson Plan

Texting "Mainia":

In this lesson, students will practice identifying the main idea and supporting details of a text, and then synthesizing this information into an expository summary.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lilys Cola TV Commercial:

Given a tight budget, students need to find the number of people that can be hired to film a soda commercial. Students will make the selection using a table that contains information about two types of extras. The union extra earns more money per hour than the non-union extra; however, the non-union extra needs more time to shoot the commercial than the union extra. In addition, students will select the design that would be used for the commercial taking into account the area that needs to be covered and the aesthetic factor.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let's Ride!:

Let's Ride! is a model-eliciting activity that asks students to use pluses and minuses to indicate if eight models of 4-door sedans meet specific standards based on gas mileage, seating capacity, warranty, and type of engine. The students then have to rank the cars and indicate their top four choices.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Room with a View: Which Characters Reached their Peak Potential in The View from Saturday?:

In this lesson, students will compare two characters from the novel, The View from Saturday, analyzing how many of their physical and emotional needs were met by the time the story ends. This determination will be reached by using Abraham Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs" as a guide. Students will also explore the influence of gender on how many human needs are reached in someone's lifetime. As a summative assessment, students will compare two characters from the novel, identifying the needs each character fulfilled and interpreting their findings in the form of a written analysis. Students will use their analysis and comparison as the basis for an informal class debate.

Type: Lesson Plan

Vacation Time:

The students will create a package list for a travel company. They must use all operations with decimals as well as compare decimals.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exercising A Right or a Wrong?:

In this lesson, students will debate the issue of whether a character was justly punished for his violation of a school rule: standing in respectful silence during the national anthem. They will assume the identities of administrators, teachers, parents, and students while arguing the issue in a mock PTSA meeting held in a school library or auditorium. In preparation for the debate, students will be asked to speak and write from the perspective of a character, stating their opinions in a slanted or biased way in both a newspaper article and persuasive paragraph using text evidence to support their perspective.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Secret Life Continues: An Analytical Extension of the Secret Life of Walter Mitty:

Students read James Thurber's short story "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty." They will read closely to analyze text structure. The lesson will culminate with them creating their own daydreams for Walter Mitty.

Type: Lesson Plan

Mucho Mulch:

In this MEA students will continue to explore and discuss the problems faced when soil is weathered and eroded away. Through the activity they will explore one of many solutions to this issue. They will also gain more perspective on the importance of considering the choices they make daily and how every choice can and does affect the environment.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teen Cell Phone Plans:

The purpose of this lesson is to solve real-world and mathematical problems using ratio and rate reasoning. Students will also use equivalent forms of decimals, percent applications to solve problems. They will write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. Students will engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fancy Fractions Catering Company Project:

Fancy Fractions Catering Company will be hosting a party and need your help to make it happen! Your help is needed to find out how much of each ingredient is needed to feed 200 people and the most economical way of doing this (Brand name brands or store brand). You also have the option of omitting up to three ingredients from the recipe.

Type: Lesson Plan

On the Road to Change: A Poetic Comparison:

In this lesson, students will analyze the song "Time of Your Life" by Green Day and two Robert Frost poems, "The Road Not Taken" and "Nothing Gold Can Stay."The instructor will model authors usage of symbolism, imagery, figurative language, tone and theme. Students will complete a graphic organizer and work toward the culminating activity of an essay comparing two of the pieces of literature.

Type: Lesson Plan

Batter Up Travel Plans:

A traveling baseball team coach is asking a group of engineers to provide a travel plan from Boston to Jacksonville, Florida with the hopes of attending Major League baseball games along their route. The students will design the route on a large US map highlighting their travel plan and submit the map and a written rationale of their plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Best School for Kevin:

In this MEA, the students will compare data to decide which school would be the best for a couple's son who is transferring into the county.

Type: Lesson Plan

Orange Juice Conversion:

In this MEA, the students will be able to convert measurements within systems and between systems. They will be able to use problem solving skills to create a process for ranking orange juices for a Bed and Breakfast.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Poignant Passage about the Middle Passage:

In this lesson, students will explore what makes a passage poignant by analyzing an important chapter from the historical fiction novel, The Slave Dancer, by Paula Fox. In cooperative groups, they will use their knowledge of figurative language, conflict, theme, and characterization to identify a passage that has high emotional impact, while better understanding one of the most tragic human experiences: the journey along the Middle Passage during the slave trade. As culminating assessments, students will present their group's textual analysis to the class and write an extended response to the text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Protecting Our Dunes:

An environmental conservation group is asked to plant vegetation on existing sand dunes in South Florida to reduce the erosion of the dunes. Group members must decide which vegetation is best to plant.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lola's Landscaping MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) asks students to develop a procedure to fit the most amount of plant packages on one sheet of cardboard, using nets and surface area.

Type: Lesson Plan

Storm Window Treatments:

Students will be asked to analyze a given set of data to determine the best storm window treatments for a local company to use when building a new homes. Students will be asked to write a letter to the company explaining how they ranked the storm window treatments.

Type: Lesson Plan

Earth's Spheres WebQuest:

This WebQuest is designed for 6th grade students. Students will work individually or in pairs to explore interactive websites and answer the questions on their Task Sheet. This is designed as an introduction to Earth's spheres (Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, Cryosphere, Biosphere, Geosphere) and how these spheres interact to support life on our planet.

Type: Lesson Plan

CIS Lesson: Hazards of Hurricanes:

In this lesson tied to English/Language Arts Standards, students receive support as they read a complex informational text about the effects of hurricanes. The teacher facilitates a close reading and writing a response-to-text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Arguing for the Sake of WINNING!:

This lesson is based on teaching 6th graders the art of assertively communicating in argumentative writing. They will use the topic of "Banning Cell Phones in Schools" to practice identifying a topic, exploring the PROS and CONS of the topic, identifying arguments and then supporting those arguments with details and evidence. They will write in the form of an argumentative letter and the culminating activity will be a presentation to the principal of their school, who is considering banning cell phones in the school.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: "The Great Fire":

The goal of this three day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they've been practicing on a regular basis to explore the historic Great Fire of Chicago. By reading and rereading the passage closely combined with classroom discussion about it, students will explore the historical truths related to poverty, city construction, and city services that led to the disaster. In this reading, students learn about historical disasters, but they may not fully comprehend causes or how human actions, nature, or even luck contributed to them, rendering history a flat subject to be memorized rather than explored. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will better understand the dangers inherent in cities and the government role in mitigating that danger.

Type: Lesson Plan

Counting down from 11: Analysis of Point of View in "Eleven" by Sandra Cisneros:

In this lesson, students create their own definitions of a child and a tween and use their definitions to guide their reading of the short story "Eleven" by Sandra Cisernos. After collecting text evidence, students will develop their own argument about the point of view of the narrator in the story through discussion and writing. In the closing activity, students will also write a found poem.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lincoln the Leader:

In this lesson, students will work cooperatively to read and analyze a poem that describes President Abraham Lincoln. Through teacher led and small-group discussions of "Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight by Vachel Lindsay, students will learn vocabulary in context, identify the speaker's point of view, and write an argument presenting and supporting their analysis of the text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Positive Steps: Using The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens:

In this multi-day lesson, students will become familiar with The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens by Sean Covey. In addition to taking ownership of the habits by tracking their own Personal Bank Account, students will work collaboratively to conduct brief research and create a presentation on one of the habits. After sharing their multimedia presentations with the class, students will determine which one is most important to them personally. Students will write a response to explain how that habit can provide a positive personal impact.

Type: Lesson Plan

Practicing, Planning and Producing Plot:

Students will write narratives correctly, using all parts of the plot diagram-characters, setting, rising action, climax, resolution. They will also be able to recognize the elements of a story in other forms of narratives such as novels and films.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Rise of the Mongoose: Using "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" in the Classroom:

In this lesson, students will study the short story "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" by Rudyard Kipling. The class will work together to read the first two pages of the story aloud and the teacher will conduct a think aloud to model strategies to determine the meaning of selected vocabulary in context. The class will also answer comprehension questions about the first two pages and discuss their understandings. Students will then work in partners or small groups for the next set of pages, reading the story aloud, using different strategies to determine the meaning of highlighted words in context, and answering questions about the story. After a group discussion, students will work to continue the process independently, examining vocabulary and answering comprehension questions for the last part of the story. The summative assessment will require students to write two extended paragraphs conceptualizing their understanding of key parts of the story and its main character, Rikki. The story, student handouts, a teacher key, a rubric, and a link to a video clip on the mongoose and a cobra are included.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Explain Yourself: Organizing Your Writing:

Learn the differences between informative and argumentative writing and how to organize your informative writing to make it more effective as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Do You Want to Build a Story?:

Learn how to write the exposition of a story and build characters, setting, conflict, and more using the power of your imagination in this interactive tutorial!  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

State Your Claim:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text…

This tutorial is about stating a claim in an argumentative essay.  The tutorial includes information about grabbers, central ideas, and previewing reasons in a claim.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Ideas

Teaching Tolerance: Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement:

This collection of teaching ideas offers multiple activities to support rich classroom discussions on Dr. King and the events of the Civil Rights Movement. Writing, WebQuests, and other extension ideas are included in this resource.

Type: Teaching Idea

Creative Writing Through Wordless Picture Books:

Wordless picture books can help students who struggle with writing narratives. In this teaching idea,"Creative Writing Through Wordless Picture Books" by Dr. Laurie A. Henry through ReadWriteThink.org, students verbally create stories to accompany wordless picture books. They then transfer their stories to writing by first attaching sticky notes to pages and later combining the sticky notes to form the complete narratives. This teaching idea also links to an online interactive story map, which might be helpful for students as they work to generate story ideas.

Type: Teaching Idea

Tutorials

Which Writing is Right? :

Use this interactive tutorial to improve your expository writing skills. This tutorial asks you questions about the qualities of expository writing and provides feedback on your responses. Finally, you will write a short paragraph and judge your own writing using the tutorial's criteria for effective expository writing.

Type: Tutorial

Personification: Cowbirds:

In this tutorial from PBS, students will explore the power of personification in non-fiction while analyzing an author's treatment of his subject in a documentary on cowbirds. They will be able to read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through videos and interactive activities as they begin to understand how this work uses human motives and emotions to tell the cowbird's story.

Type: Tutorial

Using Supporting Examples:

In this tutorial you will practice using supporting details. Each practice gives you a main idea and three possible details. Your job is to choose the detail that best supports the main idea. Each question gives you feedback on why your answer is correct or incorrect.

Type: Tutorial

Unit/Lesson Sequences

Analyzing an Autobiography through "Rosa Parks: My Story":

This sixth grade unit on Rosa Parks is a thorough examination of an autobiographical novel and includes the study of author's purpose, main idea, and fact and opinion. It includes a student packet, graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and a unit assessment with sample responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Unit Plan for Tru Confessions: Two Wishes to Accomplish:

Tru Confessions is the story of Tru, a teenager whose brother Eddie has special needs. Tru writes in her journal about her wish to find a cure for Eddie and to have her own television show. In this unit, students will examine factors that influence how families, classmates, and people in the community perceive and interact with children with developmental disabilities as they work to summarize key details and events from the text, analyze ways in which the author unfolds the plot, and explain how the author develops the point of view of the narrator and discuss how the text’s characters change.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

A Study of "America Street: A Multicultural Anthology of Stories":

This is a sixth grade unit using the collection of short stories in "America Street: A Multicultural Anthology of Stories" by Anne Mazer. Students will examine point of view, multiple perspectives, character development, and setting in these varied texts. This unit includes a complete packet with graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key and possible student responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Investigating a Mystery in "Chasing Vermeer":

This sixth grade unit is based on the mystery novel Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliett. Students will analyze clues and motives, study plot, and make predictions while learning about the artist Johannes Vermeer. It includes a complete packet with creative activities, graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key and possible student responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

A Study of Science and Fantasy Fiction in A Wrinkle in Time:

This is a sixth grade unit on the sci-fi novel A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L'Engle. Students will examine the characteristics of scientific and futuristic fiction including vocabulary, setting, and plot development. This unit includes a complete packet with graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key and possible student responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Exploring Verse Novels with "Keeping the Night Watch" and "Chess Rumble" :

This is a sixth grade unit on the verse novels Keeping the Night Watch by Hope Anita Smith and Chess Rumble by G. Neri. This unit explores narrative and lyric poetry, figurative language, author's purpose, voice, and symbolism. It includes games, graphic organizers, and a complete student packet, and includes a pacing guide and assessment with sample student answers.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Figurative Language and Author's Purpose in "Home of the Brave" by Katherine Applegate:

This is a sixth grade unit on the verse novel Home of the Brave by Katherine Applegate. This unit explores narrative and lyric poetry, figurative language, author's purpose, voice, and symbolism. It is rich with games, graphic organizers, and a complete student packet and includes a pacing guide and assessment with sample student answers.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Drawing Conclusions and Solving Mysteries in “Sammy Keyes and the Hollywood Mummy”:

This is a sixth grade unit on the mystery novel Sammy Keyes and the Hollywood Mummy by Wendelin Van Draanen. Students will analyze characters, study the plot, make predictions, and draw conclusions to solve a mystery in this forensic-themed unit. This unit includes a complete packet with graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key and possible student responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Analyzing Characters and Making Predictions in "Sammy Keyes and the Hotel Thief":

This is a sixth grade unit on the mystery novel Sammy Keyes and the Hotel Thief by Wendelin Van Draanen. Students will analyze characters, study the plot, and make predictions in this forensic-themed unit. This unit includes a complete packet with graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key and possible student responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

"The House on Mango Street": A Short Story Unit Examining Point of View, Perspective, and Plot:

This is a sixth grade unit using the short stories in The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros to identify point of view, interpret a character's perspective, and utilize plot elements to retell a story. This unit includes several graphic organizers, an assessment, and an answer key with sample responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Examining an Autobiography: "The Lost Garden" by Laurence Yep:

This is a sixth grade unit on Laurence Yep's autobiography, The Lost Garden. Students analyze author's purpose and the key characteristics of an autobiography. This unit contains a student packet, pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key and sample student responses. In addition, this unit includes instructional techniques such as a PIES chart, a T chart, and more!

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Analyzing an Autobiography through "Rosa Parks: My Story":

This sixth grade unit on Rosa Parks is a thorough examination of an autobiographical novel and includes the study of author's purpose, main idea, and fact and opinion. It includes a student packet, graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and a unit assessment with sample responses.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Analyzing the Mystery Novel "The Westing Game" by Ellen Raskin:

This is a sixth grade unit on the mystery novel "The Westing Game" by Ellen Raskin. Students will analyze the character's motives, identify clues to solve the mystery, make predictions about the conclusion, and identify 'red herrings'. This unit on detective fiction includes a complete packet with graphic organizers, a pacing guide, and an assessment with answer key.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

The Black Snowman, An Interdisciplinary Unit:

This lesson will involve work in oral language, concepts of print, spelling, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing with the use of one book, The Black Snowman.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Explain Yourself: Organizing Your Writing:

Learn the differences between informative and argumentative writing and how to organize your informative writing to make it more effective as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Do You Want to Build a Story?:

Learn how to write the exposition of a story and build characters, setting, conflict, and more using the power of your imagination in this interactive tutorial!  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

State Your Claim:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text…

This tutorial is about stating a claim in an argumentative essay.  The tutorial includes information about grabbers, central ideas, and previewing reasons in a claim.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

Which Writing is Right? :

Use this interactive tutorial to improve your expository writing skills. This tutorial asks you questions about the qualities of expository writing and provides feedback on your responses. Finally, you will write a short paragraph and judge your own writing using the tutorial's criteria for effective expository writing.

Type: Tutorial

Using Supporting Examples:

In this tutorial you will practice using supporting details. Each practice gives you a main idea and three possible details. Your job is to choose the detail that best supports the main idea. Each question gives you feedback on why your answer is correct or incorrect.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.