Cluster 1: Understand the concept of a function and use function notation. (Algebra 1 - Major Cluster) (Algebra 2 - Supporting Cluster)

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

General Information
Number: MAFS.912.F-IF.1
Title: Understand the concept of a function and use function notation. (Algebra 1 - Major Cluster) (Algebra 2 - Supporting Cluster)
Type: Cluster
Subject: Mathematics
Grade: 912
Domain-Subdomain: Functions: Interpreting Functions

Related Standards

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

MAFS.912.F-IF.1.AP.1a
Demonstrate that to be a function, from one set (called the domain) to another set (called the range) assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range.
MAFS.912.F-IF.1.AP.1b
Map elements of the domain sets to the corresponding range sets of functions and determine the rules in the relationship.
MAFS.912.F-IF.1.AP.2a
Match the correct function notation to a function or a model of a function (e.g., x f(x) y).
MAFS.912.F-IF.1.AP.3a
Recognize that the domain of a sequence is a subset of the integers. .

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Assessments

Sample 3 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 2 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 1 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is the State Interim Assessment for high school.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Recursive Sequences:

Students are asked to find the first five terms of a sequence defined recursively, explain why the sequence is a function, and describe its domain

Type: Formative Assessment

Which Sequences Are Functions?:

Students are asked to determine if each of two sequences is a function and to describe its domain, if it is a function.

Type: Formative Assessment

Cell Phone Battery Life:

Students are asked to interpret statements that use function notation in the context of a problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

What Is a Function?:

Students are asked to define the term function and describe any important properties of functions.

Type: Formative Assessment

Writing Functions:

Students are asked to create their own examples and nonexamples of functions by completing tables and mapping diagrams.

Type: Formative Assessment

Circles and Functions:

Students are shown the graph of a circle and asked to identify a portion of the graph that could be removed so that the remaining portion represents a function.

Type: Formative Assessment

What Is the Value?:

Students are asked to determine the corresponding input value for a given output using a table of values representing a function, f.

Type: Formative Assessment

Cafeteria Function:

Students are asked decide if one variable is a function of the other in the context of a real-world problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

Identifying Functions:

Students are asked to determine if relations given by tables and mapping diagrams are functions.

Type: Formative Assessment

Identifying the Graphs of Functions:

Students are given four graphs and asked to identify which represent functions and to justify their choices.

Type: Formative Assessment

What Is the Function Notation?:

Students are asked to use function notation to rewrite the formula for the volume of a cube and to explain the meaning of the notation.

Type: Formative Assessment

Graphs and Functions:

Students are asked to determine the value of a function, at an input given using function notation, by inspecting its graph.

Type: Formative Assessment

Evaluating a Function:

Students are asked to evaluate a function at a given value of the independent variable.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

The Towers of Hanoi: Experiential Recursive Thinking:


This lesson is about the Towers of Hanoi problem, a classic famous problem involving recursive thinking to reduce what appears to be a very large and difficult problem into a series of simpler ones.  The learning objective is for students to begin to understand recursive logic and thinking, relevant to computer scientists, mathematicians and engineers.   The lesson is experiential, in that each student will be working with her/his own Towers of Hanoi manipulative, inexpensively obtained.  There is no formal prerequisite, although some familiarity with set theory and functions is helpful.  The last three sections of the lesson involve some more formal concepts with recursive equations and proof by induction, so the students who work on those sections should probably be level 11 or 12 in a K-12 educational system.  The lesson has a Stop Point for 50-minute classes, followed by three more segments that may require a half to full additional class time.  So the teacher may use only those segments up to the Stop Point, or if two class sessions are to be devoted to the lesson, the entire set of segments.  Supplies are modest, and may be a set of coins or some washers from a hardware store to assemble small piles of disks in front of each student, each set of disks representing a Towers of Hanoi manipulative.  Or the students may assemble before the class a more complete Towers of Hanoi at home, as demonstrated in the video.  The classroom activities involve attempting to solve with hand and mind the Towers of Hanoi problem and discussing with fellow students patterns in the process and strategies for solution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Representing Polynomials:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to translate between graphs and algebraic representations of polynomials. In particular, this unit aims to help you identify and assist students who have difficulties in recognizing the connection between the zeros of polynomials when suitable factorizations are available, and graphs of the functions defined by polynomials as well as recognizing the connection between transformations of the graphs and transformations of the functions obtained by replacing f(x) by f(x + k), f(x) + k, -f(x), f(-x).

Type: Lesson Plan

Functions: Domain and Range:

This lesson provides a review of function concepts addressed in the 8th grade Florida standards, while introducing students to function notation and the concepts of domain and range, at an entry level.

Type: Lesson Plan

Functions and Everyday Situations:

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to articulate verbally the relationships between variables arising in everyday contexts, translate between everyday situations and sketch graphs of relationships between variables, interpret algebraic functions in terms of the contexts in which they arise and reflect on the domains of everyday functions and in particular whether they should be discrete or continuous.

Type: Lesson Plan

How much is your time worth?:

This lesson is designed to help students understand compound interest formulas as a function with respect to an independent variable. They will also be required to translate word problems into function models and use a graphing calculator to predict outcomes for various inputs.

Type: Lesson Plan

Freeze:

In this lesson students will learn how to write equations in function notation when given a real-world scenario. Students will work in groups to determine an equation for a given scenario, as well as, write a scenario for a given equation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Domain Representations:

This lesson asks students to use graphs, tables, number lines, verbal descriptions, and symbols to represent the domain of various functions. The material allows students to examine and utilize connections between a function's symbolic representation, a function's graphical representation, and a function's domain.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exponential Graphing Using Technology:

This lesson is teacher/student directed for discovering and translating exponential functions using a graphing app. The lesson focuses on the translations from a parent graph and how changing the coefficient, base and exponent values relate to the transformation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Functions, Functions, Everywhere: Part 2:

Continue exploring how to determine if a relation is a function using graphs and story situations in this interactive tutorial. 

This is the second tutorial in a 2-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Travel with Functions:

Learn how to evaluate and interpret function notation by following Melissa and Jose on their travels in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Functions, Functions Everywhere: Part 1:

What is a function? Where do we see functions in real life? Explore these questions and more using different contexts in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 1 in a two-part series on functions. Click HERE to open Part 2 (Coming Soon).

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Hurricane Dennis & Failed Math Models:

What happens when math models go wrong in forecasting hurricanes?

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Problem-Solving Tasks

Your Father:

This is a simple task touching on two key points of functions. First, there is the idea that not all functions have real numbers as domain and range values. Second, the task addresses the issue of when a function admits an inverse, and the process of "restricting the domain" in order to achieve an invertible function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Yam in the Oven:

The purpose of this task is to give students practice interpreting statements using function notation. It can be used as a diagnostic if students seem to be having trouble with function notation, for example mistakenly interpreting f(x) as the product of f and x.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Using Function Notation II:

The purpose of the task is to explicitly identify a common error made by many students when using the "identity" f(x + h) = f(x) + f(h).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Using Function Notation I:

This task addresses a common misconception about function notation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Random Walk:

This task requires interpreting a function in a non-standard context. While the domain and range of this function are both numbers, the way in which the function is determined is not via a formula but by a (pre-determined) sequence of coin flips. In addition, the task provides an opportunity to compute some probabilities in a discrete situation. The task could be used to segue the discussion from functions to probability, in particular the early standards in the S-CP domain.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Parking Lot:

The purpose of this task is to investigate the meaning of the definition of function in a real-world context where the question of whether there is more than one output for a given input arises naturally. In more advanced courses this task could be used to investigate the question of whether a function has an inverse.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Domains:

The purpose of this task to help students think about an expression for a function as built up out of simple operations on the variable and understand the domain in terms of values for which each operation is invalid (e.g., dividing by zero or taking the square root of a negative number).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Cell Phones:

This simple task assesses whether students can interpret function notation. The four parts of the task provide a logical progression of exercises for advancing understanding of function notation and how to interpret it in terms of a given context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The High School Gym:

This task asks students to consider functions in regard to temperatures in a high school gym.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Customers:

The purpose of this task is to introduce or reinforce the concept of a function, especially in a context where the function is not given by an explicit algebraic representation. Further, the last part of the task emphasizes the significance of one variable being a function of another variable in an immediately relevant real-life context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Random Walk II:

These problems form a bridge between work on functions and work on probability. The task is better suited for instruction than for assessment as it provides students with a non-standard setting in which to interpret the meaning of functions. Students should carry out the process of flipping a coin and modeling this Random Walk in order to develop a sense of the process before analyzing it mathematically.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Points on a graph:

This task is designed to get at a common student confusion between the independent and dependent variables. This confusion often arises in situations like (b), where students are asked to solve an equation involving a function, and confuse that operation with evaluating the function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Pizza Place Promotion:

This tasks asks students to use functions to predict the price of a pizza on a specific day and find which day the pizza would be cheapest according to a promotion.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parabolas and Inverse Functions:

This problem is a simple de-contextualized version of F-IF Your Father and F-IF Parking Lot. It also provides a natural context where the absolute value function arises as, in part (b), solving for x in terms of y means taking the square root of x^2 which is |x|.This task assumes students have an understanding of the relationship between functions and equations.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Interpreting the Graph:

The purpose of this task is to help students learn to read information about a function from its graph, by asking them to show the part of the graph that exhibits a certain property of the function. The task could be used to further instruction on understanding functions or as an assessment tool, with the caveat that it requires some amount of creativity to decide how to best illustrate some of the statements.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Professional Development

Domain and Range of a Function:

Khan Academy video Tutorial.

Definition of domain and range. The tutorial uses six different examples to demonstrate linear, quadratic, and rational functions with consideration to the domain and range.

Type: Professional Development

Text Resource

Patterns and Structures:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Patterns are an integral part of any system. One of the main functions of mathematics is to find patterns and create functions that generalize these patterns. There are many situations where patterns emerge and can be described by mathematics. For example, Fibonacci sequences can describe natural phenomena, quantic equations can describe repeated cases of symmetry, and there are even patterns in the occurrence of prime numbers.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Function Notation:

This tutorial will help the students to understand the function notation such as f(x), which can be thought as another way of representing the y-value in a function, especially when graphing. The y-axis is even labeled as the f(x) axis, when graphing.

Type: Tutorial

Functions:

Functions can be thought of as mathematical machines, which when given an element from a set of permissible inputs, always produce the same element from a set of possible outputs

Type: Tutorial

Vertical Line Test:

A graph in Cartesian coordinates may represent a function or may only represent a binary relation. The "vertical line test" is a visual way to determine whether or not a graph represents a function.

Type: Tutorial

Linear Functions:

In this tutorial, "Linear functions of the form f(x) = ax + b and the properties of their graphs are explored interactively using an applet." The applet allows students to manipulate variables to discover the changes in intercepts and slope of the graphed line. There are six questions for students to answer, exploring the applet and observing changes. The questions' answers are included on this site. Additionally, a tutorial for graphing linear functions by hand is included.

Type: Tutorial

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Sample Algebra 1 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP:

This sample Algebra 1 CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the Algebra 1 Course. The units and standards are customizable and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, worksheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes rows that automatically filter and display Math Formative Assessments System tasks, E-Learning Original Student Tutorials and Perspectives Videos that are aligned to the standards, available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample Algebra 1 CMAP, its features and customizability by watching the following video:

 
 
 

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please click here

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx 

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Video/Audio/Animations

What is a Function?:

This video will demonstrate how to determine what is and is not a function.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Real-Valued Functions of a Real Variable:

Although the domain and codomain of functions can consist of any type of objects, the most common functions encountered in Algebra are real-valued functions of a real variable, whose domain and codomain are the set of real numbers, R.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Domain and Range of Binary Relations:

Two sets which are often of primary interest when studying binary relations are the domain and range of the relation.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

MIT BLOSSOMS - Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations :

This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of difference equations.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulatives

Functions and Vertical Line Test:

This lesson is designed to introduce students to the vertical line test for functions as well as practice plotting points and drawing simple functions. The lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to the vertical line test and functions as well as suggested ways to integrate them into the lesson.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Function Flyer:

In this online tool, students input a function to create a graph where the constants, coefficients, and exponents can be adjusted by slider bars. This tool allows students to explore graphs of functions and how adjusting the numbers in the function affect the graph. Using tabs at the top of the page you can also access supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Fractal Tool:

Students investigate shapes that grow and change using an iterative process. Fractals are characterized by self-similarity, smaller sections that resemble the larger figure. From NCTM's Illuminations.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Functions, Functions, Everywhere: Part 2:

Continue exploring how to determine if a relation is a function using graphs and story situations in this interactive tutorial. 

This is the second tutorial in a 2-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Travel with Functions:

Learn how to evaluate and interpret function notation by following Melissa and Jose on their travels in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Functions, Functions Everywhere: Part 1:

What is a function? Where do we see functions in real life? Explore these questions and more using different contexts in this interactive tutorial.

This is part 1 in a two-part series on functions. Click HERE to open Part 2 (Coming Soon).

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Problem-Solving Tasks

Your Father:

This is a simple task touching on two key points of functions. First, there is the idea that not all functions have real numbers as domain and range values. Second, the task addresses the issue of when a function admits an inverse, and the process of "restricting the domain" in order to achieve an invertible function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Yam in the Oven:

The purpose of this task is to give students practice interpreting statements using function notation. It can be used as a diagnostic if students seem to be having trouble with function notation, for example mistakenly interpreting f(x) as the product of f and x.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Using Function Notation I:

This task addresses a common misconception about function notation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Random Walk:

This task requires interpreting a function in a non-standard context. While the domain and range of this function are both numbers, the way in which the function is determined is not via a formula but by a (pre-determined) sequence of coin flips. In addition, the task provides an opportunity to compute some probabilities in a discrete situation. The task could be used to segue the discussion from functions to probability, in particular the early standards in the S-CP domain.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Parking Lot:

The purpose of this task is to investigate the meaning of the definition of function in a real-world context where the question of whether there is more than one output for a given input arises naturally. In more advanced courses this task could be used to investigate the question of whether a function has an inverse.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Domains:

The purpose of this task to help students think about an expression for a function as built up out of simple operations on the variable and understand the domain in terms of values for which each operation is invalid (e.g., dividing by zero or taking the square root of a negative number).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Cell Phones:

This simple task assesses whether students can interpret function notation. The four parts of the task provide a logical progression of exercises for advancing understanding of function notation and how to interpret it in terms of a given context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The High School Gym:

This task asks students to consider functions in regard to temperatures in a high school gym.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Customers:

The purpose of this task is to introduce or reinforce the concept of a function, especially in a context where the function is not given by an explicit algebraic representation. Further, the last part of the task emphasizes the significance of one variable being a function of another variable in an immediately relevant real-life context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Random Walk II:

These problems form a bridge between work on functions and work on probability. The task is better suited for instruction than for assessment as it provides students with a non-standard setting in which to interpret the meaning of functions. Students should carry out the process of flipping a coin and modeling this Random Walk in order to develop a sense of the process before analyzing it mathematically.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Points on a graph:

This task is designed to get at a common student confusion between the independent and dependent variables. This confusion often arises in situations like (b), where students are asked to solve an equation involving a function, and confuse that operation with evaluating the function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Pizza Place Promotion:

This tasks asks students to use functions to predict the price of a pizza on a specific day and find which day the pizza would be cheapest according to a promotion.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parabolas and Inverse Functions:

This problem is a simple de-contextualized version of F-IF Your Father and F-IF Parking Lot. It also provides a natural context where the absolute value function arises as, in part (b), solving for x in terms of y means taking the square root of x^2 which is |x|.This task assumes students have an understanding of the relationship between functions and equations.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Interpreting the Graph:

The purpose of this task is to help students learn to read information about a function from its graph, by asking them to show the part of the graph that exhibits a certain property of the function. The task could be used to further instruction on understanding functions or as an assessment tool, with the caveat that it requires some amount of creativity to decide how to best illustrate some of the statements.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorials

Function Notation:

This tutorial will help the students to understand the function notation such as f(x), which can be thought as another way of representing the y-value in a function, especially when graphing. The y-axis is even labeled as the f(x) axis, when graphing.

Type: Tutorial

Vertical Line Test:

A graph in Cartesian coordinates may represent a function or may only represent a binary relation. The "vertical line test" is a visual way to determine whether or not a graph represents a function.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

What is a Function?:

This video will demonstrate how to determine what is and is not a function.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Real-Valued Functions of a Real Variable:

Although the domain and codomain of functions can consist of any type of objects, the most common functions encountered in Algebra are real-valued functions of a real variable, whose domain and codomain are the set of real numbers, R.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Domain and Range of Binary Relations:

Two sets which are often of primary interest when studying binary relations are the domain and range of the relation.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

MIT BLOSSOMS - Fabulous Fractals and Difference Equations :

This learning video introduces students to the world of Fractal Geometry through the use of difference equations. As a prerequisite to this lesson, students would need two years of high school algebra (comfort with single variable equations) and motivation to learn basic complex arithmetic. Ms. Zager has included a complete introductory tutorial on complex arithmetic with homework assignments downloadable here. Also downloadable are some supplemental challenge problems. Time required to complete the core lesson is approximately one hour, and materials needed include a blackboard/whiteboard as well as space for students to work in small groups. During the in-class portions of this interactive lesson, students will brainstorm on the outcome of the chaos game and practice calculating trajectories of difference equations.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulatives

Function Flyer:

In this online tool, students input a function to create a graph where the constants, coefficients, and exponents can be adjusted by slider bars. This tool allows students to explore graphs of functions and how adjusting the numbers in the function affect the graph. Using tabs at the top of the page you can also access supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Fractal Tool:

Students investigate shapes that grow and change using an iterative process. Fractals are characterized by self-similarity, smaller sections that resemble the larger figure. From NCTM's Illuminations.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Problem-Solving Tasks

Your Father:

This is a simple task touching on two key points of functions. First, there is the idea that not all functions have real numbers as domain and range values. Second, the task addresses the issue of when a function admits an inverse, and the process of "restricting the domain" in order to achieve an invertible function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Yam in the Oven:

The purpose of this task is to give students practice interpreting statements using function notation. It can be used as a diagnostic if students seem to be having trouble with function notation, for example mistakenly interpreting f(x) as the product of f and x.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Using Function Notation I:

This task addresses a common misconception about function notation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Random Walk:

This task requires interpreting a function in a non-standard context. While the domain and range of this function are both numbers, the way in which the function is determined is not via a formula but by a (pre-determined) sequence of coin flips. In addition, the task provides an opportunity to compute some probabilities in a discrete situation. The task could be used to segue the discussion from functions to probability, in particular the early standards in the S-CP domain.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Parking Lot:

The purpose of this task is to investigate the meaning of the definition of function in a real-world context where the question of whether there is more than one output for a given input arises naturally. In more advanced courses this task could be used to investigate the question of whether a function has an inverse.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Domains:

The purpose of this task to help students think about an expression for a function as built up out of simple operations on the variable and understand the domain in terms of values for which each operation is invalid (e.g., dividing by zero or taking the square root of a negative number).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Cell Phones:

This simple task assesses whether students can interpret function notation. The four parts of the task provide a logical progression of exercises for advancing understanding of function notation and how to interpret it in terms of a given context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The High School Gym:

This task asks students to consider functions in regard to temperatures in a high school gym.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

The Customers:

The purpose of this task is to introduce or reinforce the concept of a function, especially in a context where the function is not given by an explicit algebraic representation. Further, the last part of the task emphasizes the significance of one variable being a function of another variable in an immediately relevant real-life context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Random Walk II:

These problems form a bridge between work on functions and work on probability. The task is better suited for instruction than for assessment as it provides students with a non-standard setting in which to interpret the meaning of functions. Students should carry out the process of flipping a coin and modeling this Random Walk in order to develop a sense of the process before analyzing it mathematically.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Points on a graph:

This task is designed to get at a common student confusion between the independent and dependent variables. This confusion often arises in situations like (b), where students are asked to solve an equation involving a function, and confuse that operation with evaluating the function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Pizza Place Promotion:

This tasks asks students to use functions to predict the price of a pizza on a specific day and find which day the pizza would be cheapest according to a promotion.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parabolas and Inverse Functions:

This problem is a simple de-contextualized version of F-IF Your Father and F-IF Parking Lot. It also provides a natural context where the absolute value function arises as, in part (b), solving for x in terms of y means taking the square root of x^2 which is |x|.This task assumes students have an understanding of the relationship between functions and equations.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Interpreting the Graph:

The purpose of this task is to help students learn to read information about a function from its graph, by asking them to show the part of the graph that exhibits a certain property of the function. The task could be used to further instruction on understanding functions or as an assessment tool, with the caveat that it requires some amount of creativity to decide how to best illustrate some of the statements.

Type: Problem-Solving Task