Access Theatre 1   (#7967020)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.



Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

General Notes

English Language Development (ELD) Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.   For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: http://www.cpalms.org/uploads/docs/standards/eld/SI.pdf.

General Information

Course Number: 7967020
Course Path:
Abbreviated Title: Access Theatre 1
Number of Credits: Course may be taken for up to two credits
Course Length: Multiple (M) - Course length can vary
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12,30,31
Graduation Requirement: Performing/Fine Arts

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning — Part Two:

Practice identifying faulty reasoning in this two-part, interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.

Please complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.  

Please complete Part Two after completing this tutorial. Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how a speaker uses rhetoric to advance his purpose in this interactive tutorial. To achieve the final objective, you will learn how to determine a speaker’s purpose, identify different uses of rhetoric, and explain the impact of rhetoric on the speaker’s purpose. This tutorial will use excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress" from 1917. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify a concept addressed in texts from two different time periods in U.S. history and distinguish the similarities and differences between the ways the texts treat this concept. The texts featured in this tutorial are the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Effects of Text Structures in Ylla from the Martian Chronicles:

Examine the organizational patterns authors use in fictional works. These patterns are also known as text structures. You will also analyze excerpts from the story "Ylla", from The Martian Chronicles, to see how author Ray Bradbury uses these structures and other literary techniques to create certain effects, such as mystery, tension, and suspense.

First you will review common text structures. Next, you will learn how to recognize how an author's use of text structures creates certain effects in writing. Then, you will determine the choices author Ray Bradbury made in structuring portions of the text "Ylla" from The Martian Chronicles. Finally, you will analyze how these structural choices create dramatic effects in "Ylla" such as mystery, tension, or suspense.

Learn how to identify and examine common text structures and analyze how Bradbury successfully uses these structures in several excerpts from "Ylla" from The Martian Chronicles.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Building Mystery, Tension and Suspense:

Learn how to identify some of the key ways through which authors create mystery, suspense, and tension within a story.  Specifically, you’ll be able to define and explain how authors use the devices of exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to create mystery, suspense, and tension within a story.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

What Makes a Hero?:

A great way to understand literature from epic poetry to literary series is to understand what makes a hero. In this very engaging animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the hero cycle, a common literary trope that can been found in many works like Harry Potter, The Hunger Games and even The Odyssey!

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.