Fundamental Economics with Financial Literacy   (#7921042)

Version for Academic Year:
The course was/will be terminated at the end of School Year 2016 - 2017

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

Economics - The grade 9-12 Economics course consists of the following content area strands: Economics and Geography. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of the concepts and processes of the national and international economic systems. Content should include, but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the role and influence of the government and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.

Mathematics Benchmark Guidance – Social Studies instruction should include opportunities for students to interpret and create representations of historical events and concepts using mathematical tables, charts, and graphs.

Special Notes: Instructional Strategies
  1. Utilize UDL strategies when planning lessons for all students.
  2. Ensure that students have accessible instructional materials.
  3. Ensure that students read from text that varies in length and complexity.
  4. Provide graphic organizers and instruct students on how to use them properly to support understanding of concepts.
  5. Use rubrics for assignments that clearly outline expectations for students.
  6. Make close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons and provide guided practice and immediate feedback in how to do this.
  7. Provide multiple opportunities to practice new vocabulary.
  8. Provide explicit instruction in how students can locate evidence from text to support their answers.
  9. Provide extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence) based on student interest.
  10. Provide students with outlines that assist them in note taking during teacher-led instruction.
  11. Teach students to utilize appropriate graphic organizers or organize thoughts when planning for writing assignments.
Additional content that may be contained in the NAEP Grade 12 United States History assessment includes material from all time periods on the following topics:
  • Change and Continuity in American Democracy: Ideas, Institutions, Events, Key Figures, and Controversies
  • The Gathering and Interactions of Peoples, Cultures, and Ideas
  • Economic and Technological Changes and Their Relationship to Society, Ideas, and the Environment
  • The Changing Role of America in the World
The NAEP frameworks for United States History may be accessed at http://www.nagb.org/content/nagb/assets/documents/publications/frameworks/historyframework.pdf
English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section: Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: http://www.cpalms.org/uploads/docs/standards/eld/SS.pdf.

General Information

Course Number: 7921042
Course Path:
Abbreviated Title: FUND ECONOMICS WITH FIN LIT
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Length: Semester (S)
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning — Part Two:

Practice identifying faulty reasoning in this two-part, interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Make sure to complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click HERE for Part One.
  • Click HERE for Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE for Part One.

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE for Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.

Please complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.  

Please complete Part Two after completing this tutorial. Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hallowed Words: Evaluating a Speaker's Effectiveness:

Examine the hallowed words of Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address." In this interactive tutorial you'll identify his point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to evaluate his effectiveness as a speaker.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 2:

Practice literacy skills while learning more about the Pullman Strike of 1894 in this interactive tutorial.

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part 1 where you'll learn the history behind the same event.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 1:

Learn the history behind the Pullman Strike of 1894 in part 1 of this interactive tutorial.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literacy skills while learning more about the same event! 

Click HERE to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Examine a famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln, his 2nd Inaugural Address. This speech, given a month before his assassination, is considered by many to be one of his most eloquent and moving speeches. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine Lincoln's purpose for his 2nd Inaugural Address, analyze his word choice, and identify his use of parallel structure. Finally, you should be able to put all of these things together to analyze how Lincoln's word choice and use of parallel structure contributed to the purpose for his speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Eliminating Exotics: Identifying and Assessing Research for Quality and Usefulness:

Explore the topic of invasive exotics in Florida while you learn to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information in research sources, identify authoritative sources from a group of varied resources, and dissect a research question in order to identify keywords for a search of resources. With this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn to use advanced search features to find appropriate sources to address a research question and assess the usefulness of sources when addressing a specific research question. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea:

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that we may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Educational Software / Tool

Savings Calculator:

This manipulative is a versatile online savings calculator that calculates both simple and compounding interest. This free online calculator calculates and graphs accrued interest and total savings balance. The calculator allows for a variety of variables including interest rates, initial investment, time, compounded interest, and whether there are regular deposits made.

Type: Educational Software / Tool

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.