LAFS.910.W.1.3

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 910
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

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Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3a: Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation or observation and establishing one or multiple point(s) of view.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3b: Engage and orient the reader to the narrator and/or characters.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3c: Produce a narrative that includes dialogue that advances the plot or theme (e.g., reveals character motivation, feelings, thoughts, how character has changed perspectives).
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3d: Include plot techniques and pacing (e.g., flashback, foreshadowing, suspense) as appropriate in writing.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3e: Sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3f: Create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3g: Use precise words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting and/or characters.
LAFS.910.W.1.AP.3h: Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Related Resources

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