SC.5.P.13.3

Investigate and describe that the more mass an object has, the less effect a given force will have on the object's motion.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 5
Body of Knowledge: Physical Science
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Big Idea: Forces and Changes in Motion - A. It takes energy to change the motion of objects.

B. Energy change is understood in terms of forces--pushes or pulls.

C. Some forces act through physical contact, while others act at a distance.

Clarification for grades K-5: The target understanding for students in the elementary grades should focus on Big Ideas A, B, and C.

Clarification for grades 6-8: The target understanding for students in grades 6-8 should begin to transition the focus to a more specific definition of forces and changes in motion. Net forces create a change in motion. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval.

Grades 9-12, Standard 12: Motion - A. Motion can be measured and described qualitatively and quantitatively. Net forces create a change in motion. B. Momentum is conserved under well-defined conditions. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020060: Science - Grade Five (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7720060: Access Science Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
5020120: STEM Lab Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.5.P.13.Pa.1: Recognize that pushing or pulling makes an object move.
SC.5.P.13.In.2: Identify that heavier objects take more force to move than lighter ones.
SC.5.P.13.Su.2: Recognize that a heavier object is harder to move than a light one.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Hoverama:

In this lesson students will create a model hovercraft. The challenge is to lift the most mass. Students will use their knowledge of forces and how increased mass interacts with motion. They will need to follow a budget in order to purchase building material for their hovercraft. While budgeting, students will apply real world mathematical (money) problem solving. Students will use iPads to record and document the process of the engineering and building of their model hovercrafts.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Does Force Affect Motion?:

Students will explore how force affects an object's motion. Students will discuss how the greater the mass of an object, the greater the force required to move an object.  Students will use data gathered through experimentation to justify their reasoning and understanding of forces and motion.

Type: Lesson Plan

When the Wind Blows:

This is an engineering design process lesson that covers forces and motion. It is designed to engage students using hands-on problem solving strategies.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bottling Rockets:

In this lesson, students will explore the concepts of force and motion as they use the engineering design process to create and test rockets. Students will demonstrate their understanding of familiar forces by creating and presenting a poster. Take students up, up, and away with this engaging lesson!

Type: Lesson Plan

Newton's Second Law of Motion Part 2 of 3:

This lesson plan is the second in a series of connected lessons on Sir Isaac Newton's laws of motion published to CPALMS. This lesson teaches Newton's second law of motion.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sunshine Beach Hotel MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) asks students to develop a procedure to select a hurricane shutter company.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Pump Up the Volume:

This is a lesson on volume relating specifically to using the formula V = B x h.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Original Student Tutorial

Kickin' It: Playing Soccer with Inertia:

Explore the relationship between mass, forces, and motion on the soccer field in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Pinewood Derby Forces and Motion:

Let's get rolling and explore the physics behind rolling cars! Make sure you stay on track. Produced with funding from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Teaching Idea

Newton Laws of Motion-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will correlate Newton's Laws to various animal behaviors.

Type: Teaching Idea

Virtual Manipulatives

A Pendulum:

This virtual manipulative will help the students learn some important concepts of classical mechanics, such as gravitational acceleration, energy conservation and so on. This activity will also help in students learning via the process of making predictions (about number of pendulum swings), discussing outcomes and sharing results.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Balance Challenge Game:

Play with objects on a teeter totter to learn about balance.

  • Predict how objects of various masses can be used to make a plank balance.
  • Predict how changing the positions of the masses on the plank will affect the motion of the plank
  • Write rules to predict which way plank will tilt when objects are placed on it.
  • Use your rules to solve puzzles about balancing.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Explore the forces:


Students can create an applied force and see how it makes objects move. They can also make changes in friction and see how it affects the motion of objects.

  • Identify when forces are balanced vs. unbalanced.
  • Determine the sum of forces (net force) on an object with more than one force on it.
  • Predict the motion of an object with zero net force.
  • Predict the direction of motion given a combination of forces.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Forces in 1 Dimension:

This is a virtual manipulative which demonstrates the principles of force. Students can click on a man and push different objects of varying masses across the screen. The resulting forces (frictional and total force) are shown. Graphs show forces, position and acceleration as a function of time. Free body diagrams of all the forces can also be viewed.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Sunshine Beach Hotel MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) asks students to develop a procedure to select a hurricane shutter company.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades K-8

Kickin' It: Playing Soccer with Inertia:

Explore the relationship between mass, forces, and motion on the soccer field in this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Kickin' It: Playing Soccer with Inertia:

Explore the relationship between mass, forces, and motion on the soccer field in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Virtual Manipulatives

A Pendulum:

This virtual manipulative will help the students learn some important concepts of classical mechanics, such as gravitational acceleration, energy conservation and so on. This activity will also help in students learning via the process of making predictions (about number of pendulum swings), discussing outcomes and sharing results.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Balance Challenge Game:

Play with objects on a teeter totter to learn about balance.

  • Predict how objects of various masses can be used to make a plank balance.
  • Predict how changing the positions of the masses on the plank will affect the motion of the plank
  • Write rules to predict which way plank will tilt when objects are placed on it.
  • Use your rules to solve puzzles about balancing.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Explore the forces:


Students can create an applied force and see how it makes objects move. They can also make changes in friction and see how it affects the motion of objects.

  • Identify when forces are balanced vs. unbalanced.
  • Determine the sum of forces (net force) on an object with more than one force on it.
  • Predict the motion of an object with zero net force.
  • Predict the direction of motion given a combination of forces.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Forces in 1 Dimension:

This is a virtual manipulative which demonstrates the principles of force. Students can click on a man and push different objects of varying masses across the screen. The resulting forces (frictional and total force) are shown. Graphs show forces, position and acceleration as a function of time. Free body diagrams of all the forces can also be viewed.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Virtual Manipulatives

A Pendulum:

This virtual manipulative will help the students learn some important concepts of classical mechanics, such as gravitational acceleration, energy conservation and so on. This activity will also help in students learning via the process of making predictions (about number of pendulum swings), discussing outcomes and sharing results.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Balance Challenge Game:

Play with objects on a teeter totter to learn about balance.

  • Predict how objects of various masses can be used to make a plank balance.
  • Predict how changing the positions of the masses on the plank will affect the motion of the plank
  • Write rules to predict which way plank will tilt when objects are placed on it.
  • Use your rules to solve puzzles about balancing.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Explore the forces:


Students can create an applied force and see how it makes objects move. They can also make changes in friction and see how it affects the motion of objects.

  • Identify when forces are balanced vs. unbalanced.
  • Determine the sum of forces (net force) on an object with more than one force on it.
  • Predict the motion of an object with zero net force.
  • Predict the direction of motion given a combination of forces.

Type: Virtual Manipulative