ELA.2.C.2.1

Present information orally using complete sentences, appropriate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Clear pronunciation shows an understanding and application of phonics rules and sight words as well as care taken in delivery. A student’s speech impediment should not be considered as impeding clear pronunciation.

Clarification 2: For further guidance, see the Elementary Oral Communication Rubric.

General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 2
Strand: Communication
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010043: Language Arts - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
7710013: Access Language Arts - Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5011020: Library Skills/Information Literacy Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
5010102: Introduction to Debate Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010013: English for Speakers of Other Languages Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2021 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
ELA.2.C.2.AP.1: Express information using complete sentences and appropriate volume, using the student’s mode of communication.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

We the Kids: The Preamble of the Constitution:: Preamble Summary and Presentation:

This is lesson #5 in the text unit series for We the Kids by David Catrow. In small groups, students will use the KWL chart that has been filled in throughout the unit to support them in identifying the central idea and relevant details from the Preamble of the United States Constitution. Small groups will then share their retelling through a presentation (act out, posterboard, etc.)

This unit will help students develop the meaning of the Preamble as part of the Constitution of the United States and its direct effect on their daily lives. Students will engage in various activities such as debating parts of the Preamble and complete a play interpreting patriotism. Throughout the unit students will have to identify and interpret vocabulary, analyze the provided text, and demonstrate an understanding of the Preamble by providing relevant details. The teacher’s role in this unit will be to support their students' knowledge of the Preamble by facilitating research, reviewing student writing, and work.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

We the Kids: The Preamble of the Constitution: Reader's Theater Patriotism:

This is lesson #6 in the text unit series for We the Kids by David Catrow. Students will have already read or heard the entire text. Students will explain how citizens demonstrate patriotism after doing independent research on the computer. Students will begin by reviewing ways citizens demonstrate patriotism. Students will work in groups to research Constitution Day, making a connection between this patriotic holiday and the U.S. Constitution. In small groups, students will use their research to write a Reader’s Theater script, explaining ways citizens demonstrate patriotism, why it is important to recognize the patriotic holiday, Constitution Day, and the history behind the holiday as it relates to the U.S. Constitution. Students can read and act out the play as an extension activity.

This unit will help students develop the meaning of the Preamble as part of the Constitution of the United States and its direct effect on their daily lives. Students will engage in various activities such as debating parts of the Preamble and complete a play interpreting patriotism. Throughout the unit, students will have to identify and interpret vocabulary, analyze the provided text, and demonstrate an understanding of the Preamble by providing relevant details. The teacher’s role in this unit will be to support their students' knowledge of the Preamble by facilitating research, reviewing student writing, and work.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

We the Kids: The Preamble of the Constitution: Introduction to the Preamble of the Constitution of the United States:

This is lesson #1 in the text unit series for We the Kids by David Catrow. In this lesson, students will demonstrate their background knowledge on the Constitution of the United States, including the Preamble, by completing the sentence “We the People. . .” They will create a KWL chart that will be used throughout the unit to keep track of information learned. They will listen to first page of the text read aloud to them to begin to learn about the Preamble.

This unit will help students gain an understanding of the preamble and its direct effect on their daily lives. Students will engage in various activities such as debating parts of the preamble and complete a play interpreting patriotism. Throughout the unit students will have to identify and interpret vocabulary, analyze the provided text, and demonstrate an understanding of the Preamble by providing relevant details. The teacher’s role in this unit will be to support their students' understanding of the Preamble by facilitating research and reviewing student writing.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

We the Kids: The Preamble of the Constitution: Responsible Citizen vs. Irresponsible Citizen:

This is lesson #2 in the text unit series for We the Kids by David Katrow. Students will use prior knowledge from reading the text to show the difference between responsible and irresponsible citizenship. The class will be split in half and one side will act out or show how a responsible citizen acts in society. Then, the other half will show or act out an irresponsible citizen. Students will be put in pairs and complete a graphic organizer together to share their information with the class. The teacher will display the results on one big graphic organizer for the students to see as a whole group. Students will write 8 complete sentences on a piece of paper (4 for responsible and 4 for irresponsible) showing examples of responsible and irresponsible citizenship.

This unit will help students gain an understanding of the Preamble and its direct effect on their daily lives. Students will engage in various activities such as debating parts of the Preamble and completing a play interpreting patriotism. Throughout the unit, students will have to identify and interpret vocabulary, analyze the provided text, and demonstrate an understanding of the Preamble by providing relevant details. The teacher’s role in this unit will be to support his/her students' understanding of the Preamble by facilitating research, reviewing student writing, and work.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

People Who Represent Florida: Marjory Stoneman Douglas: Important Things She Did & Why She Represents Florida:

Students will participate in digital research, explain how text features contribute to the meaning of the text, use context clues to determine the meaning of unknown words, and incorporate multimedia to enhance their written work in this integrated lesson plan. Using two sections from an Interactive Research Page, students will learn about Marjory Stoneman Douglas, her contributions as an environmentalist, and why she is an individual who represents Florida.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Symbols: White House Scratch Coding:

This lesson is Part 2 in a 2-part Integrated Civics Unit. Students will use their expository writing from U.S. Symbols: The White House Part 1 to plan, write, and publish a Scratch coding program.  With support from the teacher and peers, students will use at least one sprite, a background, narrations, and animations to explain why the White House is a symbol that represents the United States. 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

What Is a Government? Lesson #4 Keeping People Safe:

Students will identify the central idea and relevant details in a passage from What Is a Government? By Baron Bedesky, in this lesson plan. They will  draw a picture to match the relevant details and central idea written in their journal/graphic organizer. Students will share their work, explaining how the government positively impacts their daily life. 

This lesson focuses on pages 8-11 and is lesson #4 of a 6 lesson unit plan based on this text.

This unit will support students as they explain why people form governments, the role of laws in government, the impact of government on daily life, and the ways the government protects the rights and liberty of American citizens. Students will engage in a read aloud of the text, What is Government, spread out over several lessons, emphasizing text features, vocabulary, central idea, and author’s purpose. In addition, the teacher will facilitate research, student presentations, expository writing, artwork, computer science, and identifying Florida symbols to help students solidify their interpretation as to why people form governments.

Type: Lesson Plan

Coding with Everglades National Park Animals:

Students will create a program in scratch that sorts animals common to the Everglades National Park according to their main habitat in this integrated lesson plan.  They will use the provided Venn Diagram backgound template and choose at least 4 previously-researched Everglades National Park animals to use as sprites. Students will then code the sprites to ‘move’ to the appropriate section of the Venn Diagram (water, land, both).

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Listen Up! Having Fun with Sound Words:

In this lesson, students will be able to recognize and decode the use of sound words in literature. Students will practice these skills through a sound game, creating a word web, and making a sound word flip book.

Type: Lesson Plan

Extra! Extra! Read All About It! Learning About Text Features:

In this lesson, students will use nonfiction texts to learn about how text features help readers. Groups will be assigned a text feature to become an expert on. They will create a poster about their text feature and teach the class about what they have learned. Students will be given a group presentation self-assessment to think about what the group did well together and what could be done differently the next time.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hamming It Up with Character:

Students will learn about characters in narrative text through group collaboration, the creation of character trading cards and an oral presentation of original dialogue. Students will work in collaboarative groups to think of adjectives that would best describe how the characters look, behave, and feel.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hamming it up with Plot:

Using the classic story, The Three Little Pigs, students will learn will use a plot line graphic organizer to record the action in this story. Students will use this plot line to help them retell the story in writing and record their paragraphs using technology such as Voice Thread.

Type: Lesson Plan

Adjectives, Adjectives, and More Adjectives:

In this lesson, students will become familiar with the use of adjectives for the purpose of describing someone or something. Students will use adjectives to describe their teacher and enhance simple sentences by adding adjectives to describe the nouns. Students will also illustrate a self-portrait and use at least six adjectives to describe themselves. They will then choose from those adjectives and write two sentences about themselves using those words. The students will present these sentences and self-portraits to the class. Students will have the opportunity to work individually and with partners throughout this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Practicing Fluency with Shel Silverstein:

Your students will be delighted to become immersed into the world of Shel Silverstein’s masterful poems. As students practice fluency and oral presentation, they will also learn how to identify various rhyme schemes and record their favorite poem.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plan

We the Kids: The Preamble of the Constitution: Responsible Citizen vs. Irresponsible Citizen:

This is lesson #2 in the text unit series for We the Kids by David Katrow. Students will use prior knowledge from reading the text to show the difference between responsible and irresponsible citizenship. The class will be split in half and one side will act out or show how a responsible citizen acts in society. Then, the other half will show or act out an irresponsible citizen. Students will be put in pairs and complete a graphic organizer together to share their information with the class. The teacher will display the results on one big graphic organizer for the students to see as a whole group. Students will write 8 complete sentences on a piece of paper (4 for responsible and 4 for irresponsible) showing examples of responsible and irresponsible citizenship.

This unit will help students gain an understanding of the Preamble and its direct effect on their daily lives. Students will engage in various activities such as debating parts of the Preamble and completing a play interpreting patriotism. Throughout the unit, students will have to identify and interpret vocabulary, analyze the provided text, and demonstrate an understanding of the Preamble by providing relevant details. The teacher’s role in this unit will be to support his/her students' understanding of the Preamble by facilitating research, reviewing student writing, and work.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.