LAFS.2.L.1.2Archived Standard

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  1. Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
  2. Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
  3. Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
  4. Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil).
  5. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 2
Strand: Language Standards
Idea: Level 1: Recall
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Content Complexity Rating: Level 1: Recall - More Information
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved - Archived

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010043: Language Arts - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
7710013: Access Language Arts - Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010102: Introduction to Debate Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Can We Ever Have Too Many Toys?:

Using David Shannon's book Too Many Toys, students will practice writing an opinion paragraph.

Type: Lesson Plan

Celebrity Parties Inc. MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) requires students to develop a procedure to determine which month to hold an outdoor party for a celebrity pop star. Students will need to apply their knowledge of weather patterns and severe weather effects to determine which month would most likely have the best weather for the event.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Choosing a Host City for the Olympic Games:

In this model eliciting activity, students are asked to help the International Olympic Committee rank prospective host cities for upcoming Summer Olympic Games. Students are provided with data about a list of applicant cities and then must rank the cities and write a proposal to the IOC explaining their rankings. At the end of the MEA, the students will write an opinion piece for the International Olympic Committee that tells their final decision about which city should be the next host of the Summer Olympic Games.

Type: Lesson Plan

Carnival:

Written at a second grade level, in this MEA the students will use problem solving skills, two-digit addition, and knowledge of greater than and less than to rank order carnival games based on provided criteria.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Class Pets:

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, students will devise a plan for ranking, and justify it, in order to choose the best class pet. Students will use problem-solving skills, interpret data presented in tables, add two-digit numbers, compare two and three-digit numbers, and create bar graphs.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Type: Lesson Plan

Our School Store:

The focus of this lesson is to devise a plan and justify it in order to choose the best school supply company. Students will use problem-solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two- and three-digit addition, writing skills, and money skills to determine the best school supply company. Students will also need to check their procedure to determine if it will work when given additional data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Kelly's Jelly:

Students use problem solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two and three digit addition, writing skills and money skills to determine which brand of jelly beans they would like to purchase. The jelly beans differ in taste, quantity, and cost. The students must then check their procedure to determine if it will work when given an additional piece of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Restaurant Rankings: Which meal would you want to add to your cafeteria menu?:

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, students have been selected by the cafeteria manager to help rank healthy meal options that have been proposed to be added to the school cafeteria. The students will use information about the food and drink included in the meal, total calories, sodium content, calories from saturated fat, and calories from sugar to come up with a procedure for ranking the meal options. Then students will have to use or adapt their original procedures to include two more meal options in the rankings.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Type: Lesson Plan

Chocolate Delight:

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, Chocolate Delight, a chocolate bar company, wants to improve its sales to elementary students by creating a healthy chocolate bar. They have tested 5 new recipes and need to determine which candy bar is best for children. The students will determine a procedure for ranking the recipes from best to worst based on the following criteria: healthiness, taste, and nut allergies and make a recommendation of the healthiest recipe to Chocolate Delight.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Type: Lesson Plan

Give Me Your Opinion:

Would you rather ride in a spaceship or on a submarine? This is the question the students will ponder as they write an opinion piece, taking it through the writing process.

Type: Lesson Plan

Contraction Surgery:

Students will participate in this engaging activity to learn how to write contractions while acting like surgeons.

Type: Lesson Plan

Friendly Writing:

At the start of this lesson, students will review the friendly letter format as the teacher reads I Wanna Iguana and I Wanna New Room by Karen Kaufman Orloff to the students. These books are told in a friendly letter format between the main character and his parents. With teacher modeling and support, students will then generate a topic and practice writing a friendly letter as a class. Next, students will apply the friendly letter format to create a writing piece. Students will receive practice at editing their writing, independently through peer feedback, and in teacher-student mini conferences.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Captain Capitalization's Treasure Hunt:

Capitalize holidays, product names, and names of places around the world as you hunt for treasure in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Student Center Activities

Vocabulary: Abbreviation Match-Up:

In this activity, students will identify common abbreviations.

Type: Student Center Activity

Vocabulary: Spin Sort:

In this activity, students will identify and sort contractions, synonyms, antonyms, abbreviations, homophones, and homographs.

Type: Student Center Activity

Vocabulary: Contraction Connection:

In this activity, students will match words to contractions on a game board.

Type: Student Center Activity

Advanced Phonics: Double Time:

In this activity, students will write corresponding spelling patterns for long vowels in multisyllabic words. As an extension activity, students will write the correct vowel for the schwa sound.

Type: Student Center Activity

Advanced Phonics: Sound Choice:

In this activity, students will decode and spell words containing vowel diphthongs while playing a board game.

Type: Student Center Activity

Advanced Phonics: The Write Word:

In this activity, students will produce words with different spelling patterns while playing a game.

Type: Student Center Activity

Advanced Phonics: Word-O-Matic:

In this activity, students will make words using letter cards containing digraphs, silent letter combinations, vowel teams, and vowel diphthongs.

Type: Student Center Activity

Advanced Phonics: Star Search:

In this activity, students will decode and spell words with r-controlled vowel patterns.

Type: Student Center Activity

Phonics: Word Plus:

In this activity, students will identify and write individual words in compound words.

Type: Student Center Activity

Vocabulary: Contraction Bingo!:

In this activity, students will identify contractions by playing a bingo-type game.

Type: Student Center Activity

Teaching Idea

One Earth, Step Gently:

This teaching idea describes a project where students studied a specific topic about protecting the environment, created collages in the style of children's illustrator, Eric Carle, and wrote a book which includes 23 ways people can help our planet.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resource

Guide to Grammar and Writing: Capitalization:

This text resource is a guide to proper capitalization. A PowerPoint is included.

Type: Text Resource

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Carnival:

Written at a second grade level, in this MEA the students will use problem solving skills, two-digit addition, and knowledge of greater than and less than to rank order carnival games based on provided criteria.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Celebrity Parties Inc. MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) requires students to develop a procedure to determine which month to hold an outdoor party for a celebrity pop star. Students will need to apply their knowledge of weather patterns and severe weather effects to determine which month would most likely have the best weather for the event.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Chocolate Delight:

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, Chocolate Delight, a chocolate bar company, wants to improve its sales to elementary students by creating a healthy chocolate bar. They have tested 5 new recipes and need to determine which candy bar is best for children. The students will determine a procedure for ranking the recipes from best to worst based on the following criteria: healthiness, taste, and nut allergies and make a recommendation of the healthiest recipe to Chocolate Delight.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Choosing a Host City for the Olympic Games:

In this model eliciting activity, students are asked to help the International Olympic Committee rank prospective host cities for upcoming Summer Olympic Games. Students are provided with data about a list of applicant cities and then must rank the cities and write a proposal to the IOC explaining their rankings. At the end of the MEA, the students will write an opinion piece for the International Olympic Committee that tells their final decision about which city should be the next host of the Summer Olympic Games.

Class Pets:

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, students will devise a plan for ranking, and justify it, in order to choose the best class pet. Students will use problem-solving skills, interpret data presented in tables, add two-digit numbers, compare two and three-digit numbers, and create bar graphs.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Kelly's Jelly:

Students use problem solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two and three digit addition, writing skills and money skills to determine which brand of jelly beans they would like to purchase. The jelly beans differ in taste, quantity, and cost. The students must then check their procedure to determine if it will work when given an additional piece of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Our School Store:

The focus of this lesson is to devise a plan and justify it in order to choose the best school supply company. Students will use problem-solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two- and three-digit addition, writing skills, and money skills to determine the best school supply company. Students will also need to check their procedure to determine if it will work when given additional data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Restaurant Rankings: Which meal would you want to add to your cafeteria menu?:

In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, students have been selected by the cafeteria manager to help rank healthy meal options that have been proposed to be added to the school cafeteria. The students will use information about the food and drink included in the meal, total calories, sodium content, calories from saturated fat, and calories from sugar to come up with a procedure for ranking the meal options. Then students will have to use or adapt their original procedures to include two more meal options in the rankings.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. MEAs resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. Students work in teams to apply their knowledge of science and mathematics to solve an open-ended problem, while considering constraints and tradeoffs. Students integrate their ELA skills into MEAs as they are asked to clearly document their thought process. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator. To learn more about MEA’s visit: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades K-5

Captain Capitalization's Treasure Hunt:

Capitalize holidays, product names, and names of places around the world as you hunt for treasure in this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Captain Capitalization's Treasure Hunt:

Capitalize holidays, product names, and names of places around the world as you hunt for treasure in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Student Center Activity

Advanced Phonics: Word-O-Matic:

In this activity, students will make words using letter cards containing digraphs, silent letter combinations, vowel teams, and vowel diphthongs.

Type: Student Center Activity