MAFS.912.G-GMD.1.1

Give an informal argument for the formulas for the circumference of a circle, area of a circle, volume of a cylinder, pyramid, and cone. Use dissection arguments, Cavalieri’s principle, and informal limit arguments.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 912
Domain-Subdomain: Geometry: Geometric Measurement & Dimension
Cluster: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Cluster: Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems. (Geometry - Additional Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications

  • Assessment Limits :
    Informal arguments are limited to dissection arguments, Cavalieri’s
    principle, and informal limit arguments.

    Items may require the student to recall the formula for the
    circumference and area of a circle.

  • Calculator :

    Neutral

  • Clarification :
    Students will give an informal argument for the formulas for the circumference of a circle; the area of a circle; or the volume of a cylinder, a pyramid, and a cone.
  • Stimulus Attributes :
    Items may be set in a real-world or mathematical context. 

    Items may ask the student to analyze an informal argument to determine mathematical accuracy.

  • Response Attributes :
    Items may require the student to use or choose the correct unit of
    measure.
Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question:

    Alejandro cut a circle with circumference C and radius r into 8 congruent sectors and used them to make the figure shown.

    Alejandro noticed that the figure was very close to the shape of a parallelogram. Select all the statements that apply to the figure..

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MS: Multiselect

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1200400: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 9-12 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1206300: Informal Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1206310: Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1206320: Geometry Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1298310: Advanced Topics in Mathematics (formerly 129830A) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
7912060: Access Informal Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015 (course terminated))
1206315: Geometry for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7912065: Access Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.912.G-GMD.1.AP.1a: Describe why the formulas work for a circle or cylinder (circumference of a circle, area of a circle, volume of a cylinder) based on a dissection.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 3 - High School Geometry State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 2 - High School Geometry State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grade.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Volume of a Cylinder:

Students are asked to derive and explain a formula for the volume of a cylinder given a prism with the same height and the same cross-sectional area at every height.

Type: Formative Assessment

Area and Circumference – 1:

This task is the first in a series of three tasks that assess the students’ understanding of informal derivations of the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle. In this task, students are shown a regular n-gon inscribed in a circle. They are asked to use the formula for the area of the n-gon to derive an equation that describes the relationship between the area and circumference of the circle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Volume of a Cone:

Students are asked to derive and explain a formula for the volume of a cone given a pyramid with the same height and the same cross-sectional area at every height.

Type: Formative Assessment

Area and Circumference - 3:

This task is the third in a series of three tasks that assess the students’ understanding of informal derivations of the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle. In this task, students are given the definition of pi as the area of the unit circle, A(1), and are asked to use this representation of pi along with the results from the two previous tasks to generate formulas for the area and circumference of a circle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Area and Circumference - 2:

This task is the second in a series of three tasks that assesses the students’ understanding of informal derivations of the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle. In this task, students show that the area of the circle of radius r, A(r), can be found in terms of the area of the unit circle, A(1) [i.e., A(r) = r2 · A(1)].

Type: Formative Assessment

Volume of a Pyramid:

Students are guided through the process of writing an informal argument for the volume of a pyramid formula using Cavalieri’s Principle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Filled to Capacity!:

This is a lesson where students investigate, compare, dissect, and use the relationship between volume of a cone and cylinder with equal corresponding dimensions.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Relationship Between Cones and Cylinders:

Students are guided through the creation of a cone and a cylinder with the same height and base. At the conclusion of the lesson, the students will know that the volume ratio between the cone and cylinder is 1:3.

Type: Lesson Plan

Discovering the Formulas for Circumference and Area of a Circle:

Using reasoning skills, students will understand how the formulas for circumference and area of a circle are derived. Students will use a wide array of skills such as deductive reasoning, finding patterns, using algebra, modeling and transformation of an object. The teacher ensures student success through direct instruction, investigation and collaborative group work.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cylinder Volume Lesson Plan:

Using volume in the real world

Type: Lesson Plan

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Using Geometry for Interior Design and Architecture:

An architect discusses how he uses circumference and area calculations to accurately create designs and plans.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Robot Mathematics: Gearing Ratio Calculations for Performance:

A science teacher demonstrates stepwise calculations involving multiple variables for designing robots with desired characteristics.

Type: Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Video/Audio/Animation

Story of Pi:

This video dynamically shows how Pi works, and how it is used.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

MFAS Formative Assessments

Area and Circumference – 1:

This task is the first in a series of three tasks that assess the students’ understanding of informal derivations of the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle. In this task, students are shown a regular n-gon inscribed in a circle. They are asked to use the formula for the area of the n-gon to derive an equation that describes the relationship between the area and circumference of the circle.

Area and Circumference - 2:

This task is the second in a series of three tasks that assesses the students’ understanding of informal derivations of the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle. In this task, students show that the area of the circle of radius r, A(r), can be found in terms of the area of the unit circle, A(1) [i.e., A(r) = r2 · A(1)].

Area and Circumference - 3:

This task is the third in a series of three tasks that assess the students’ understanding of informal derivations of the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle. In this task, students are given the definition of pi as the area of the unit circle, A(1), and are asked to use this representation of pi along with the results from the two previous tasks to generate formulas for the area and circumference of a circle.

Volume of a Cone:

Students are asked to derive and explain a formula for the volume of a cone given a pyramid with the same height and the same cross-sectional area at every height.

Volume of a Cylinder:

Students are asked to derive and explain a formula for the volume of a cylinder given a prism with the same height and the same cross-sectional area at every height.

Volume of a Pyramid:

Students are guided through the process of writing an informal argument for the volume of a pyramid formula using Cavalieri’s Principle.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Video/Audio/Animation

Story of Pi:

This video dynamically shows how Pi works, and how it is used.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation