SS.912.A.6.5

Explain the impact of World War II on domestic government policy.

Clarifications

Examples may include, but are not limited to, rationing, national security, civil rights, increased job opportunities for African Americans, women, Jews, and other refugees.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: American History
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2100320: United States History Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2100390: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, the U.S. and the World from 1848 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2100480: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, U.S. and the World from 1848 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1800300: Aerospace Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1800310: Aerospace Science 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1800340: Advanced Aerospace Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1800350: Aerospace Science 4:Transportation (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1801310: Army: Leadership Education and Training 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1801330: Army: Leadership Education and Training 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100310: United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7921025: Access United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
2100315: United States History for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.912.A.6.In.e: Identify an impact of World War II on domestic government policy, such as rationing, national security, civil rights, and increased job opportunities.
SS.912.A.6.Su.e: Recognize an impact of World War II on domestic government policy, such as rationing, national security, civil rights, or increased job opportunities.
SS.912.A.6.Pa.e: Recognize that war causes changes in home life.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Japanese American Internment: Evaluating Primary Sources:

This web resource from the Library of Congress supports student use of primary sources to understand the Japanese American experience of internment during World War II. The resource includes graphic organizers for students to use online or through printed copies, and primary source photos and interviews along with procedures for teaching the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Picturing World Wars: The Great War & The Greatest Generation at War:

This 3-day lesson focuses on helping students analyze propaganda posters from both world wars to better understand how the U.S. government used propaganda to acquire civilian support. Students will analyze the images and phrases used in the posters, the purpose for each poster, any biases exhibited, and even generate questions about each poster that can be used for additional research. Through analysis of the posters students will be introduced to some of the challenges America faced by going to war. For the end of lesson assessment, students will write an explanatory essay about the government's use of propaganda in these wars. The posters, graphic organizers, answer keys, and a rubric to assess student writing have been included with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Resource Collection

American Experience: Franklin D. Roosevelt:

This full-length video is a complete biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 32nd President of the United States. Topics touched on include the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II. Teachers should find the video an excellent resource to review or learn more about this time period.

The webpage also includes numerous shorter videos, articles, and primary sources about FDR, as well as a teacher's guide for using the film in class.

Type: Resource Collection

Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Korematsu v. United States (1944):

Learn more about the 1944 landmark Supreme Court decision Korematsu v. U.S. In this case, the Supreme Court considered the issue of domestic internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The Court's ruling remains one of its most controversial decisions ever.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: World War II - Part 2:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the changes Americans experienced during World War II. During the war years, the roles of women and African-Americans changed drastically, and the government and economy greatly expanded. America exited the war in its new position as the world's leading superpower. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Original Student Tutorials Social Studies - U.S. History - Grades 9-12

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Korematsu v. United States (1944):

Learn more about the 1944 landmark Supreme Court decision Korematsu v. U.S. In this case, the Supreme Court considered the issue of domestic internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The Court's ruling remains one of its most controversial decisions ever.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: World War II - Part 2:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the changes Americans experienced during World War II. During the war years, the roles of women and African-Americans changed drastically, and the government and economy greatly expanded. America exited the war in its new position as the world's leading superpower. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.