SS.4.A.1.2

Synthesize information related to Florida history through print and electronic media.

Clarifications

Examples may include, but are not limited to,  encyclopedias, atlases, newspapers, websites, databases, audio, video, etc.
General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 4
Strand: American History
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021060: Social Studies Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
7721015: Access Social Studies - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5011040: Library Skills/Information Literacy 4 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.4.A.1.In.b: Use print and electronic media to collect information about Florida history.
SS.4.A.1.Su.b: Use print and electronic media to identify information about Florida history.
SS.4.A.1.Pa.b: Use technology to access information about Florida.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Military Bases in Florida during World War II:

The purpose of this lesson is to understand the role that Florida played in World War II. This lesson uses primary sources, from the Two Regimes Collection, to bring the Holocaust and World War II closer to home for Florida students. The history of the Holocaust (1933-1945), is included in s. 1003.42, Florida Statutes. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Railroads Change Florida: Zora Neale Hurston and the Railroad Track Lining Chants:

Zora Neale Hurston is most often remembered as a gifted novelist with a knack for capturing the essence of the lives of rural Southerners, especially in Florida. She was also, however, a folklorist who helped the Federal Writers’ Project document the lives and traditions of African-Americans during the Great Depression. Hurston’s work has been instrumental in writing the history of African-American individuals and communities. In this lesson students will listen to a track lining song that was collected by Zora Neale Hurston to write brief journal responses to the audio recording.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

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