SC.8.P.8.9

Distinguish among mixtures (including solutions) and pure substances.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 8
Body of Knowledge: Physical Science
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Big Idea: Properties of Matter - A. All objects and substances in the world are made of matter. Matter has two fundamental properties: matter takes up space and matter has mass which gives it inertia.

B. Objects and substances can be classified by their physical and chemical properties. Mass is the amount of matter (or "stuff") in an object. Weight, on the other hand, is the measure of force of attraction (gravitational force) between an object and Earth.

The concepts of mass and weight are complicated and potentially confusing to elementary students. Hence, the more familiar term of "weight" is recommended for use to stand for both mass and weight in grades K-5. By grades 6-8, students are expected to understand the distinction between mass and weight, and use them appropriately.

Clarification for grades K-2: The use of the more familiar term ‘weight’ instead of the term “mass” is recommended for grades K-2.

Clarification for grades 3-5: In grade 3, introduce the term mass as compared to the term weight. In grade 4, investigate the concept of weight versus mass of objects. In grade 5, discuss why mass (not weight) is used to compare properties of solids, liquids and gases.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2002100: M/J Comprehensive Science 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002110: M/J Comprehensive Science 3, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003010: M/J Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003020: M/J Physical Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7820017: Access M/J Comprehensive Science 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2002055: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 Accelerated Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.8.P.8.In.2: Recognize that the weight of an object is related to the pull of gravity.
SC.8.P.8.Pa.5: Separate a mixture into its parts.
SC.8.P.8.Su.8: Recognize examples of pure substances and mixtures.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

All the Small Things:

Students will observe and analyze visual representations. Students will sort, classify and compare their findings to known characteristics of pure substances (elements and compounds) and mixtures. Students will differentiate matter into pure substances (elements and compounds) and mixtures on a basic molecular level. Students will use hands-on card sorting to create a rule for sorting matter. The definitions of pure substance, mixture, element, and compound will be introduced.

Type: Lesson Plan

Mixtures and Solutions Uncovered:

This lesson is a hands-on approach to SC.8.P.8.9 that the students enjoy and are engaged in. The main activities cover making anchor charts (teacher lead) that will assist them in completing activities that cover vocabulary and a break down of characteristics for mixtures. There are four group activities that will guide the students to an understanding of the standard outlined. This is a two-day lab that adds teacher demonstration and allows for collaborative group and student-talk sessions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pure Substances, Mixtures and Solutions, Oh My!:

This lesson will assist students in distinguishing between pure substances and mixtures. Students will be able to identify elements and compounds as examples of pure substances. Students will also be able to distinguish between homogeneous (solutions) and heterogeneous mixtures.

Type: Lesson Plan

Is Popeye's Favorite Drink a Mixture or a Solution?:

In the cartoon, 'Popeye the Sailor Man', he ate spinach for quick energy and increased muscle power. This is aimed at what might be his favorite drink, a spinach smoothie which is an example of a heterogeneous mixture. This lesson can also be done by students in groups if more ingredients and supplies are obtained so everyone can mix up a Popeye smoothie.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's All Mixed Up!:

This lesson supports student understanding of mixtures and pure substances.

Type: Lesson Plan

Mixture or Solution?:

Textbook definition: "Mixtures are formed simply by blending two or more substances together in some random proportion without chemically changing the individual substances in the mixture."

Mixtures can then be broken down into homogeneous and heterogeneous. A homogeneous mixture is called a solution: salt or sugar and water, air (solution of gases). These have a constant composition throughout the solution. A heterogeneous mixture would be: salt with sugar (no water), water with gasoline or oil, salt with sand. These have areas with differing compositions (you could usually see the separation of the two things).

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Mixtures and Pure Substances:

Learn the difference between pure elements, pure compounds, mixtures and solutions in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Concentration:

  • Explain the concept of concentration
  • Explain the effect of concentration changes on colors of solutions
  • Demonstrate the effect of changing the amount of solute, or solvent, or both on the concentration of the solution
  • Identify a saturated solution

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

Understanding solutions:

•Use pictures and proportional reasoning to explain changes in concentration
•Draw what happens at the molecular level when compounds dissolve in water
•Identify if a compound is a salt or sugar by macroscopic observations or microscopic representations.
•Explain how using combinations of solutes changes solution characteristics or not.
•Use observations to explain ways concentration of a solute can change.
•Describe ways the formula, macroscopic observations, or microscopic representations of a compound indicates if the bonding is ionic or covalent.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Worksheet

Composition of Matter:

This is a worksheet of examples to distinguish between elements, compounds and mixtures and between heterogeneous and homogeneous mixtures and between colloids and suspensions.

Type: Worksheet

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades K-8

Mixtures and Pure Substances:

Learn the difference between pure elements, pure compounds, mixtures and solutions in this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Mixtures and Pure Substances:

Learn the difference between pure elements, pure compounds, mixtures and solutions in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Concentration:

  • Explain the concept of concentration
  • Explain the effect of concentration changes on colors of solutions
  • Demonstrate the effect of changing the amount of solute, or solvent, or both on the concentration of the solution
  • Identify a saturated solution

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Video/Audio/Animation

Concentration:

  • Explain the concept of concentration
  • Explain the effect of concentration changes on colors of solutions
  • Demonstrate the effect of changing the amount of solute, or solvent, or both on the concentration of the solution
  • Identify a saturated solution

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

Understanding solutions:

•Use pictures and proportional reasoning to explain changes in concentration
•Draw what happens at the molecular level when compounds dissolve in water
•Identify if a compound is a salt or sugar by macroscopic observations or microscopic representations.
•Explain how using combinations of solutes changes solution characteristics or not.
•Use observations to explain ways concentration of a solute can change.
•Describe ways the formula, macroscopic observations, or microscopic representations of a compound indicates if the bonding is ionic or covalent.

Type: Virtual Manipulative