SS.3.CG.2.4

Recognize symbols, individuals, documents and events that represent the United States.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Students will recognize Mount Rushmore, Uncle Sam and the Washington Monument as symbols that represent the United States.

Clarification 2: Students will recognize James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Booker T. Washington and Susan B. Anthony as individuals who represent the United States.

Clarification 3: Students will recognize the U.S. Constitution as a document that represents the United States.

Clarification 4: Students will recognize the Constitutional Convention (May 1787 – September 1787) and the signing of the U.S. Constitution (September 17, 1787) as events that represent the United States.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 3
Strand: Civics and Government
Date Adopted or Revised: 05/24
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021050: Social Studies Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
7721014: Access Social Studies - Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.3.CG.2.AP.4: Identify events that represent the United States.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Symbols of America: Mount Rushmore, Lesson 4 :

Students will use the research gathered from lesson 3 to create an interactive Scratch program that provides facts about Mount Rushmore as an American symbol. This is lesson 4 of a 4-part integrated computer science and civics mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Symbols of America: The Washington Monument, Lesson 1:

Students will learn about the Washington Monument and its importance as an American symbol. They will interact with a Scratch program to learn basic facts about the monument and then complete a graphic organizer based on online research. This is lesson one of a 4-part integrated computer science and civics mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Symbols of America: Uncle Sam, Lesson 2:

Students will learn about the figure of Uncle Sam and its importance as an American symbol. They will interact with a Scratch program to learn basic facts about the icon and then complete a comic strip based on online research. This is lesson two of a 4-part integrated computer science and civics mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Symbols of America: Mount Rushmore, Lesson 3:

Students will learn about Mount Rushmore and its importance as an American symbol. They will interact with a Scratch program to learn basic facts about Mount Rushmore and then complete online research on the topic and fill out a graphic organizer. This is lesson three of a 4-part integrated computer science and civics mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Father of the Constitution: A Story about James Madison: Timeline to the Constitution:

This is lesson #4 in the text unit series for Father of the Constitution, A Story about James Madison by Barbara Mitchell. Students will use a timeline to sequence the events in James Madison’s life that led to the ratification of the US Constitution, consider how Madison is named the father of the constitution, and discuss why he is an individual that represents the United States.

This unit of study is about the Father of the Constitution, James Madison. Through this unit, students will follow the life of James Madison, creating a timeline of events that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution and the democratic government system still in use today. Students will research, develop an argumentative debate, and vote, as they read the text. Students will realize that his process prepared Madison for the writing of the U.S. Constitution. Students will engage in the expository writing process to construct a Classroom Constitution that aligns with the school’s vision and mission statements.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Symbols Construction:

Students will interpret and make comparisons of construction start and end dates and heights of U.S. symbols. Students will solve one- and two-step word problems based on the data. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln: Life of Honesty: Ideas of Freedom:

This is lesson #5 in the unit, Abraham Lincoln: A Life of Honesty by Tonya Leslie. The lesson focuses on using relevant details within the Emancipation Proclamation and the Bill of Rights to determine the central idea. Additionally, students will summarize the similarities within the two documents.

This unit will help students explain why the United States Constitution is an important document that protects the rights of American citizens, the responsibilities of the United States government, and how Abraham Lincoln is an important symbol of the United States Government.

Students will engage in a read aloud spread out over several lessons emphasizing vocabulary, central idea, research, expository and opinion writing, and collaboration in groups.

The teacher will facilitate vocabulary instruction, student research, determination of central ideas, student presentation, expository and opinion writing, and group collaboration to help students demonstrate why the United States Constitution is an important document.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Father of the Constitution: A Story about James Madison: National and State Songs and Symbols:

This is lesson 1 of 6 in the text unit series for Father of the Constitution, A Story about James Madison by Barbara Mitchell. In this lesson, students will be engaged in learning about national and state symbols. In small groups, students will compare the national and state seals, the national and state songs, and the national and state preambles to their constitutions. The groups will use a graphic organizer to identify relevant details and summarize the information they learned from comparing and contrasting each item. Groups will present their findings to the group. The lesson will conclude with a group discussion about whether the school and the class have similar items to compare.

This unit of study is about the Father of the Constitution, James Madison. Through this unit, students will follow the life of James Madison, creating a timeline of events that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution and the democratic government system still in use today. Students will research, develop an argumentative debate, and vote as they read the text. Students will realize that this process prepared Madison for the writing of the U.S. Constitution. Students will engage in the expository writing process to construct a Classroom Constitution that aligns with the school’s vision and mission statements.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Many Years?:

Students will discuss what they know about individuals who represent the U.S. or Florida and interpret data including important dates in the lives of these individuals. Students will use the data to solve one and two-step word problems in this integrated lesson.  

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Images Data Sort:

Students will determine ways to categorize images of symbols, individuals and documents that represent the United States to create a table of their data. Using the table students will create a scaled pictograph in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents the US? (Part 2):

Students will utilize research completed on specific individuals (James Madison, Susan B. Anthony, Booker T. Washington, or Alexander Hamilton) who represent the United States of America to create and present a digital artifact.  The research worksheet was completed in Lesson 1 of this unit, Resource 209141. This is Lesson 2 of a 3-part integrated Civics and Computer Science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents the US? (Part 3):

Students will utilize research completed on specific individuals (James Madison, Susan B. Anthony, Booker T. Washington and Alexander Hamilton) who represent the United States of America to create a digital timeline on Scratch.  This is Lesson 3 in a 3-part unit integrating civics and computer science. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents the US? (Part 1):

Students will research individuals (James Madison, Susan B. Anthony, Booker T. Washington and Alexander Hamilton) who represent the US. They will create a Bubble Map on one individual.  This is part 1 of a 3 part series that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.  The unit ends with creating a Scratch program on one of these individuals.

Type: Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln: Life of Honesty: The United States Bill of Rights: What Rights Does It Give Us?:

This is lesson #3 in the text unit series for Abraham Lincoln: A Life of Honesty by Tonya Leslie. It is a pre-reading lesson. Students will be reading a Kid Friendly Language version of the Bill of Rights and identifying the central idea of two amendments. Students will then share the central ideas of their amendments with fellow students in a group activity.

This unit will help students explain why the United States Constitution is an important document that protects the rights of American citizens, the responsibilities of the United States government, and how Abraham Lincoln is an important symbol of the United States Government.

Students will engage in a read aloud spread out over several lessons emphasizing vocabulary, central idea, research, expository and opinion writing, and collaboration in groups.

The teacher will facilitate vocabulary instruction, student research, determination of central ideas, student presentation, expository and opinion writing, and group collaboration to help students demonstrate why the United States Constitution is an important document.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Landmarks: Natural or Man-Made:

In this lesson plan, students will be introduced to natural and man-made landmarks. Students will use an interactive notebook that pairs with the teacher’s presentation. Students will write in the interactive notebook while the teacher discusses and shows examples of natural and man-made landmarks that are located in the United States. Teacher will also review landmarks that are symbols which represent the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Regions of the United States:

In this lesson plan, students will be introduced to the five regions of the United States. Students will make connections between the five regions and the origin of symbols, individuals, and events that represent the United States of America. 

Type: Lesson Plan

A Walk Through Significant Resources:

In this lesson plan, students will begin an engagement activity where the teacher shows an image of the Washington Monument and students will be asked it's symbolism. Then students will take a gallery walk of images and discuss what they see or have read and record their information on a worksheet. The teacher will introduce the terms “primary source” and “secondary source” along with the definition for each. The teacher will share examples of both primary and secondary sources and engage students in conversation about the examples. For a review of the lesson, students will be divided into groups of 3 or 4, and each group will be given a deck of cards (source examples) and sort them into primary source or secondary source categories. As a closing, students will discuss how they categorized their cards and to check for understanding of the lesson, students will complete an exit ticket.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sightseeing the U.S. Symbols:

Students will review the details of various trips to landmark destinations in the U.S. and rank the trips from most to least preferred, in this model eliciting activity.

Type: Lesson Plan

Representing Symbols Using Perimeter and Area:

In this integrated lesson, students will create Uncle Sam cards encouraging responsible citizenship, find the dimensions of their card, and then use measurement, addition, and multiplication to solve a real-world task requiring calculation of perimeter and area of a larger space to display all of the student-created Uncle Sam cards. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Mapping Features of the U.S.A:

In this lesson, students will label different geographic features, as well as natural and man-made landmarks and symbols around the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Landmark Debate:

The purpose of this lesson is for the students to recognize Mount Rushmore and the Washington Monument as man-made landmarks that are symbols of the United States. The students will write an opinion piece about which landmark, Mount Rushmore or the Washington Monument, most represents the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

Mapping U.S. Landmarks:

In this lesson, students will use map elements to identify six U.S. landmarks on a map. After identifying the landmarks, students will use the map scale to estimate the distance between the six locations.

Type: Lesson Plan

Historical Narrative Letter:

Students will research and write about one of three United States symbols for this integrated lesson. Given a graphic organizer, students will collaboratively collect information on their symbol using text and/or internet resources. Task students with writing a friendly letter from the perspective of a child in the time-period of their symbol’s origin/most significance. Students will be provided with a guiding graphic organizer and a rubric for composing their final product.

Type: Lesson Plan

Symbols, Figures and Documents that represent the USA and Florida:

In this lesson, students will become fluent with recognizing U.S. symbols and documents. Students will play a matching game and at the end of the game students will be more familiar with historical figures, symbols, documents, and current government facts.

Type: Lesson Plan

Plot, Order, and Compare Dates in History:

Students will apply their understanding of place value to plot, order, and compare event descriptions related to key figures in history. The key figures used in this lesson are James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Booker T. Washington, Susan B. Anthony, William Pope Duval, William Dunn Mosely and Josiah T. Walls. Students will make connections between using a number line to plot, order and compare numbers, to real-world careers that use timelines for historical purposes in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Idea

Grade 3 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 3 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

Grade 3 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 3 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea