LAFS.910.RST.3.7

Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 910
Strand: Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects 6-12
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1200310: Algebra 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200320: Algebra 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200370: Algebra 1-A (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200380: Algebra 1-B (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1207310: Liberal Arts Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1206300: Informal Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1206310: Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1206320: Geometry Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001350: Astronomy Solar/Galactic (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000310: Biology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000320: Biology 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000430: Biology Technology (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000370: Botany (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2003350: Chemistry 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001310: Earth/Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001320: Earth/Space Science Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000380: Ecology (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002480: Forensic Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002490: Forensic Sciences 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002400: Integrated Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002410: Integrated Science 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002420: Integrated Science 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002430: Integrated Science 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000390: Limnology (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2003310: Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2003320: Physical Science Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2003600: Principles of Technology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2003610: Principles of Technology 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2002330: Space Technology and Engineering (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2000410: Zoology (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200500: Advanced Algebra with Financial Applications (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015 (course terminated))
2000800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Biology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
2002340: Experimental Science 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002350: Experimental Science 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0500300: Executive Internship 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0500500: Personal, Career, and School Development Skills 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0500510: Personal, Career, and School Development Skills 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1304300: Music Technology and Sound Engineering 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020, 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1304310: Music Technology and Sound Engineering 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020, 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700310: Research 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
7912070: Access Liberal Arts Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond)
7912080: Access Algebra 1A (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond)
7912090: Access Algebra 1B (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond)
7920015: Access Biology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
7920020: Access Earth/Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
7920025: Access Integrated Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
2000315: Biology 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2000500: Bioscience 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2002405: Integrated Science 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
2002425: Integrated Science 2 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1200315: Algebra 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
1200375: Algebra 1-A for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond)
1200385: Algebra 1-B for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond)
1206315: Geometry for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
7912100: Fundamental Algebraic Skills (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
7912105: Fundamental Consumer Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
7912110: Fundamental Explorations in Mathematics 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
7912115: Fundamental Explorations in Mathematics 2 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
1207300: Liberal Arts Mathematics 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond)
7912065: Access Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2015 and beyond)
7912075: Access Algebra 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond)
2003836: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Physics 1 (Specifically in versions: 2015 and beyond)
2003838: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Physics 2 (Specifically in versions: 2015 and beyond)
7920022: Access Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
1200387: Mathematics for Data and Financial Literacy (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2001330: Meteorology Honors (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar:

This diabetes MEA provides students with the opportunity to investigate finding affordable health coverage, a problem common to many people living with diabetes. Students must rank doctors based on certain costs and the specific services they provide. The main focus of this MEA is to determine the best doctors to go to for diabetic care and treatment, weighing factors such as insurance, cost, doctor visits, location, patient ratings, number of years in business, diet, exercise, weight management, stress management, network participation, and support groups.

Type: Lesson Plan

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Patches:

Students apply geometric measures and methods, art knowledge, contextual information, and utilize clear and coherent writing to analyze NASA space shuttle mission patches from both a mathematical design and visual arts perspective.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cape Florida Lighthouse: Lore and Calculations:

The historic Cape Florida Lighthouse, often described as a conical tower, teems with mathematical applications. This lesson focuses on the change in volume and lateral surface area throughout its storied existence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Stop That Arguing:

Students will explore representing the movement of objects and the relationship between the various forms of representation: verbal descriptions, value tables, graphs, and equations. These representations include speed, starting position, and direction. This exploration includes brief direct instruction, guided practice in the form of a game, and independent practice in the form of word problem. Students will demonstrate understanding of this concept through a written commitment of their answer to the word problem supported with evidence from value tables, graphs, and equations.

Type: Lesson Plan

Interchangeable Wristwatch Band:

Students use measures and properties of rectangular prisms and cylinders to model and rank 3D printable designs of interchangeable wristwatch bands that satisfy physical constraints.

Type: Lesson Plan

Olympic Snowboard Design:

This MEA requires students to design a custom snowboard for five Olympic athletes, taking into consideration how their height and weight affect the design elements of a snowboard. There are several factors that go into the design of a snowboard, and the students must use reasoning skills to determine which factors are more important and why, as well as what factors to eliminate or add based on the athlete's style and preferences. After the students have designed a board for each athlete, they will report their procedure and reasons for their decisions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Winner! Winner! - Expected Values:

County Fairs and Carnivals are wonderful. The smell of the food, the thrill of the rides, and the chance to win prizes make for a perfect combination.

Winner! Winner! is an activity about the Carnival coming to town with seven (7) exciting games: Rolling Dice, Bottle Bowling, Fish Bowl, Weigh in on That!, Pin the Wing, Colors, and Spin It! Student groups must look at the cost, rules, and awarded prizes in order to give the best rank order for these games. The groups will be expected to give details on the procedures they used to develop their ranking order. Furthermore, students will be expected to calculate the expected values of the Rolling Dice game and interpret the results in context.

All of a sudden more information is collected about these Carnival Games and now the savvy students must use this information to either revise or rewrite their procedures. Then, when the students are ready to attack this new dilemma, they will encounter Andy, a Carnival Lover, who has had a thrilling time but now discovers his funds are running low. Which games will the students select for Andy and why?

Type: Lesson Plan

Phalangelpodscribitis? - Analysis with Probability:

Have you ever had a cold or some other ailment that was just a nuisance to you? You tried this medication and that medication in order to treat your self-diagnosis. However, when you have exhausted all your avenues, you find yourself at the Physician's office: paying the co-pay, getting a prescription, paying more to fill the prescription with hopes of not experiencing any of the side effects associated with the medicine, and if that particular medicine doesn't work, you are back at the doctor's office and switched to another.

Well, Phalangelpodscribitis is a recently diagnosed ailment that will put a person's feet in motion. It isn't contagious but the treatment can be intense. In this lesson students will be presented with seven (7) medications that will help cure an individual of Phalangelpodscribitis. Students will be given the effectiveness of each medication, the cost to patients with and without insurance, and the possible side effects of each. Each team will be tasked with ranking these medications for a client in order to help him decide the pros and cons of the medications that should be used in treating Phalangelpodscribitis (PPS).

Each team will be responsible for recording the procedure they used to rank the medications and to calculate the expected cost for the client when two medications must be administered since the first will prove ineffective for treatment alone. The team's suggestion brings results and the patient is cured!!

Time has passed and Phalangelpodscribitis, currently known as PPS, has returned. Oh no! What will your team suggest when the doctor begins to discuss the patient's mortality rate as it is associated with the medication?

Type: Lesson Plan

Off on a Tangent:

Students learn and apply vocabulary, notation, concepts, and geometric construction techniques associated with circles and their tangents to a historical real-world scenario, the Mason-Dixon Line, and a hypothetical real-world scenario, the North-South Florida Line.

Type: Lesson Plan

Preserving Our Marine Ecosystems:

The focus of this MEA is oil spills and their effect on the environment. In this activity, students from a fictitious class are studying about the effects of an oil spill on marine ecosystems and have performed an experiment in which they were asked to try to rid a teaspoon of corn oil from a baking pan filled with two liters of water as thoroughly as possible in a limited timeframe and with limited resources. By examining, analyzing, and evaluating experimental data related to resource usage, disposal, and labor costs, students must face the tradeoffs that are involved in trying to preserve an ecosystem when time, money, and resources are limited.

Type: Lesson Plan

Falling for Gravity:

Students will investigate the motion of three objects of different masses undergoing free fall. Additionally, students will:

  • Use spark timers to collect displacement and time data.
  • Use this data to calculate the average velocity for the object during each interval.
  • Graph this data on a velocity versus time graph, V-t. They find the slope of this graph to calculate acceleration.
  • Calculate the falling object's acceleration from their data table and graph this data on an acceleration versus time graph, a-t.
  • Use their Spark timer data paper, cut it into intervals, and paste these intervals into their displacement versus time graph.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ramp It Up:

Using inquiry techniques, students, working in groups, are asked to design and conduct experiments to test the Law of Conservation of Energy and the Law of Conservation of Momentum. Upon being provided with textbooks, rulers, measuring tapes, stopwatches, mini-storage containers, golf balls, marbles, rubber balls, steel balls, and pennies, they work cooperatively to implement and revise their hypotheses. With limited guidance from the teacher, students are able to visualize the relationships between mass, velocity, height, gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, and total energy as well as the relationships between mass, velocity, and momentum.

Type: Lesson Plan

Heating Curve of Water:

The lesson is inquiry based, asking students to investigate phase changes and kinetic molecular theory. They are to measure and graph the heating of water while correctly analyzing how the particles kinetic energy changes through each phase change.

Type: Lesson Plan

Racing Hotwheels:

Students will investigate acceleration by releasing a toy car down a ramp.

They will collect data, calculate the velocity of the car as it goes down a ramp, graph this velocity verses time, and then find the slope of the V/T graph. They will understand that this represents the acceleration of the velocity of the car ((v2-v1) = a * (t2-t1)).

They will also plot an acceleration verses time graph (A/T), and use this graph to calculate the velocity of the car and for a certain time interval, A * T = V

Type: Lesson Plan

Mystery Isotopes:

Through this engaging activity students work as a group to create models of isotopes with stickers and construction paper. Students also use models created by their peers to analyze the number of subatomic particles and determine isotopes' names. All worksheets and data collection sheets are included.

Type: Lesson Plan

Riding the Roller Coaster of Success:

Students compete with one another to design and build a roller coaster from insulation tubing and tape that will allow a marble to travel from start to finish with the lowest average velocity. In so doing, students learn about differences between distance and displacement, speed and velocity, and potential and kinetic energy. They also examine the Law of Conservation of Energy and concepts related to force and motion.

Type: Lesson Plan

To Friend or Not Friend:

The in this activity on chemical bonding, students will mimic Facebook, choosing "friends" based on their oxidation number. When the oxidation numbers of two or more elements equal zero, a stable bond has been formed. The purpose of this activity is for students to understand the rules for which elements bond to make compounds.

Type: Lesson Plan

Crafty Circumference Challenge:

Students identify, find, and use recycled, repurposed, or reclaimed objects to create "crafty" construction tools to partition the circumference of a circle into three, four, and six congruent arcs which determine vertices of regular polygons inscribed in the circle.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Music Is On and Popping! Two-way Tables:

This MEA is designed to have teams of 4 students look at data in a two-way table. Teams must discuss which categorical or quantitative factors might be the driving force of a song's popularity. Hopefully, popular songs have some common thread running through them.

Each team must write down their thought process on how they will create the most popular playlist of songs for a local radio station. A major constraint for each team is to thoroughly explain how they will maximize the 11 minutes available with the most popular songs.

Students will be provided with letters from a local radio station, WMMM - where you can receive your "Daily Mix of Music and Math." WMMM has 10 songs and the researchers have collected data on each. Student teams: it is your responsibility to pick the playlist and write a letter to the station supporting why you made your particular selection. The winning team gets an opportunity to record a sound bite which introduces their playlist on the radio.

Now, just when the teams believe they have addressed WMMM's request, a twist is thrown in the midst, and the student teams must return to the drawing board and write a second letter to the station which may or may not affect the team's original playlist.

Do you have the musical swag to connect the associations?

Type: Lesson Plan

Efficient Storage:

The topic of this MEA is work and power. Students will be assigned the task of hiring workers to complete a given task. In order to make a decision as to which workers to hire, the students initially must calculate the required work. The power each worker can exert, the days each worker is available to work each week, the number of sick days each worker has taken over the past 12 months, and the salary each worker commands will then be provided. Full- and/or part-time positions are available. Through data analysis, the students will need to evaluate which factors are most significant in the hiring process. For instance, some groups may select the most efficient workers; other groups may select the group of workers that will cost the company the least amount of money; still other groups may choose the workers that can complete the job in the shortest amount of time. Each group will also be required to provide the rationale that justifies the selection of which workers to hire.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sunspot Case Study:

The Sunspot Activity Case Study is set up as a series of short activities centered around readings or graphs. Students learn about solar cycles that cause a change in the amount of solar radiation received by the Earth. Students are asked to analyze how these solar cycles might be contributing to global warming and climate change.

Type: Lesson Plan

Down By the Sea:

In this lesson, students will create 3 graphs showing the average monthly temperatures of 6 cities. Cities at similar latitudes are paired together on a graph. One city represents inland conditions and the other represents ocean-side conditions at that latitude. There are 2 versions of the activity. Version A for independent learners asks them to formulate a conclusions about how proximity to an ocean affects a community's climate. Version B for developing learners, follows each graph is the same set of 3 questions which are designed to focus student attention on the temperature differences experienced between inland and ocean-side communities. In the final portion of the activity, students are asked to come up with general temperature patterns for inland vs. ocean-side communities.

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Brand of Chocolate Chip Cookie Would You Buy?:

In this activity, students will utilize measurement data provided in a chart to calculate areas, volumes, and densities of cookies. They will then analyze their data and determine how these values can be used to market a fictitious brand of chocolate chip cookie. Finally, they will integrate cost and taste into their analyses and generate a marketing campaign for a cookie brand of their choosing based upon a set sample data which has been provided to them.

Type: Lesson Plan

I-on-it (Ionic) or not?:

In this physically engaging activity students will debate with their peers whether a randomly drawn statement/diagram/compound name or formula applies to ionic bonds, covalent bonds or both types of bonds. Then sort themselves throughout the room accordingly. Peer support and collaboration are encouraged while the teacher facilitates proper placement. Activity concludes with a T chart graphic organizer and a writing assignment where students personify the bond types.

Type: Lesson Plan

Turning Tires Model Eliciting Activity:

The Turning Tires MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best tire material for certain situations. The main focus of the MEA is applying geometric concepts through modeling.

Type: Lesson Plan

Amusement Park Physics:

Students will research various types of amusement park rides and use their findings to design a feasible ride of their own. They will summarize their findings and present their ride design to the class. Each student will then write a persuasive letter to a local amusement park describing the reasons their ride design is the best.

Type: Lesson Plan

Constant Velocity using the Buggy Car:

Students explore constant velocity through collecting data on a motorized buggy car. They collect data, graph their Displacement - Time (D-T) data to find the slope of the line and thus the velocity of their buggy car. They then formulate the D = V * t equation gotten from their graph and use it to extrapolate variables. Then they plot the Velocity - Time (V-T) to explore finding Displacement through that graph. They formulate V*t = Displacement from this graph. Finally, they use this equation to extrapolate "what if" questions about their buggy car.

Type: Lesson Plan

Plants versus Pollutants Model Eliciting Activity:

The Plants versus Pollutants MEA provides students with an open-ended problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best plants to clean up certain toxins. This MEA requires students to formulate a phytoremediation-based solution to a problem involving cleaning of a contaminated land site. Students are provided the context of the problem, a request letter from a client asking them to provide a recommendation, and data relevant to the situation. Students utilize the data to create a defensible model solution to present to the client.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Untangling Food Webs:

Learn how living organisms can be organized into food webs and how energy is transferred through a food web from producers to consumers to decomposers. This interactive tutorial also includes interactive knowledge checks.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comparing Mitosis and Meiosis:

Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in this interactive tutorial. You'll also relate them to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree:

Learn to identify basic trends in the evolutionary history of humans, including walking upright, brain size, jaw size, and tool use in "Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree" online tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Professional Development

Cultivating Literacy: Reading Skills and Standards:

Click "View Site" to open a full-screen version.

By the end of this module, teachers should be able to:

  • Name the key instructional shifts in English Language Arts and Literacy
  • Label the College and Career Readiness, also known as CCR, anchor standards for Reading
  • Use the language of the Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects to identify what students should know and be able to do
  • Arrange and sequence the Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects
  • Distinguish the changes in rigor as a Reading standard progresses from one grade band to the next

This is Module 1 of 4 in the series, "Literacy across the Content Areas: Reading and Writing to Build Content Knowledge."

Type: Professional Development

Text Resources

Zanzibar's Malaria Hunter:

This informational text resource is designed to support reading in the content area. The article is about a woman, Habiba, who uses a motorbike to travel to families in the villages of Zanzibar to track, test, and treat malaria patients. After receiving a text message about the location of a malaria patient, she travels to the patient and tests the patient's family to see if other family members have malaria. Then, she treats any infected family members with medicine, giving them extra medicine and insecticide-treated mosquito nets, while educating them about prevention of the disease and its transmission.

Type: Text Resource

In the Valley of Wolves: Reintroduction of the Wolves:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone has resulted in many changes in the ecosystem. Before the wolves were reintroduced, large elk populations destroyed aspen and willow trees, preventing their reproduction. Since wolves were reintroduced, elk have had to change their browsing behavior, allowing some vegetation to recover in certain areas. This has affected many other species, including beavers, birds, fish and insects.

Type: Text Resource

How Nuclear Power Works:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. Nuclear power has become a suggested solution to the issue of energy dependence, but what exactly is nuclear power? This article focuses on the many aspects of nuclear power including how it's created through fission and harnessed for electricity. Discussion of the pros and cons of nuclear energy and storage methods is also covered.

Type: Text Resource

Tornadoes Strike Again. How Do They Work?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Tornado events seem to be increasing over the years. Computer simulations and high-resolution satellite imagery are a few of the emerging technologies that have helped us to predict and respond more rapidly to this deadly force of nature. The article gives a solid discussion of the role of latent heat and moving air in tornado formation. It also reviews energy transformations and gives an overview of several ways that people can more safely live in Tornado Alley.

Type: Text Resource

Invasive Pythons Put Squeeze on Everglades' Animals:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This interesting article about Burmese pythons in the Everglades showcases the effect one invasive species has on a local ecosystem and habitat. This is a great way to discuss invasive species in the classroom and explore the causes and effects on biodiversity.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorial

Winds of Change: Fostering Literacy with Science Texts:

Click "View Site" to open a full-screen version. This tutorial is designed to help secondary science teachers learn how to integrate literacy skills into their science curriculum. This tutorial will demonstrate a number of strategies teachers can impart to students to help students learn how to translate visual information into words. The focus on literacy across content areas is intended to help foster students' reading, writing, and thinking skills in multiple disciplines.

Type: Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar:

This diabetes MEA provides students with the opportunity to investigate finding affordable health coverage, a problem common to many people living with diabetes. Students must rank doctors based on certain costs and the specific services they provide. The main focus of this MEA is to determine the best doctors to go to for diabetic care and treatment, weighing factors such as insurance, cost, doctor visits, location, patient ratings, number of years in business, diet, exercise, weight management, stress management, network participation, and support groups.

Efficient Storage:

The topic of this MEA is work and power. Students will be assigned the task of hiring workers to complete a given task. In order to make a decision as to which workers to hire, the students initially must calculate the required work. The power each worker can exert, the days each worker is available to work each week, the number of sick days each worker has taken over the past 12 months, and the salary each worker commands will then be provided. Full- and/or part-time positions are available. Through data analysis, the students will need to evaluate which factors are most significant in the hiring process. For instance, some groups may select the most efficient workers; other groups may select the group of workers that will cost the company the least amount of money; still other groups may choose the workers that can complete the job in the shortest amount of time. Each group will also be required to provide the rationale that justifies the selection of which workers to hire.

Interchangeable Wristwatch Band:

Students use measures and properties of rectangular prisms and cylinders to model and rank 3D printable designs of interchangeable wristwatch bands that satisfy physical constraints.

NASA Space Shuttle Mission Patches:

Students apply geometric measures and methods, art knowledge, contextual information, and utilize clear and coherent writing to analyze NASA space shuttle mission patches from both a mathematical design and visual arts perspective.

Olympic Snowboard Design:

This MEA requires students to design a custom snowboard for five Olympic athletes, taking into consideration how their height and weight affect the design elements of a snowboard. There are several factors that go into the design of a snowboard, and the students must use reasoning skills to determine which factors are more important and why, as well as what factors to eliminate or add based on the athlete's style and preferences. After the students have designed a board for each athlete, they will report their procedure and reasons for their decisions.

Phalangelpodscribitis? - Analysis with Probability:

Have you ever had a cold or some other ailment that was just a nuisance to you? You tried this medication and that medication in order to treat your self-diagnosis. However, when you have exhausted all your avenues, you find yourself at the Physician's office: paying the co-pay, getting a prescription, paying more to fill the prescription with hopes of not experiencing any of the side effects associated with the medicine, and if that particular medicine doesn't work, you are back at the doctor's office and switched to another.

Well, Phalangelpodscribitis is a recently diagnosed ailment that will put a person's feet in motion. It isn't contagious but the treatment can be intense. In this lesson students will be presented with seven (7) medications that will help cure an individual of Phalangelpodscribitis. Students will be given the effectiveness of each medication, the cost to patients with and without insurance, and the possible side effects of each. Each team will be tasked with ranking these medications for a client in order to help him decide the pros and cons of the medications that should be used in treating Phalangelpodscribitis (PPS).

Each team will be responsible for recording the procedure they used to rank the medications and to calculate the expected cost for the client when two medications must be administered since the first will prove ineffective for treatment alone. The team's suggestion brings results and the patient is cured!!

Time has passed and Phalangelpodscribitis, currently known as PPS, has returned. Oh no! What will your team suggest when the doctor begins to discuss the patient's mortality rate as it is associated with the medication?

Plants versus Pollutants Model Eliciting Activity:

The Plants versus Pollutants MEA provides students with an open-ended problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best plants to clean up certain toxins. This MEA requires students to formulate a phytoremediation-based solution to a problem involving cleaning of a contaminated land site. Students are provided the context of the problem, a request letter from a client asking them to provide a recommendation, and data relevant to the situation. Students utilize the data to create a defensible model solution to present to the client.

Preserving Our Marine Ecosystems:

The focus of this MEA is oil spills and their effect on the environment. In this activity, students from a fictitious class are studying about the effects of an oil spill on marine ecosystems and have performed an experiment in which they were asked to try to rid a teaspoon of corn oil from a baking pan filled with two liters of water as thoroughly as possible in a limited timeframe and with limited resources. By examining, analyzing, and evaluating experimental data related to resource usage, disposal, and labor costs, students must face the tradeoffs that are involved in trying to preserve an ecosystem when time, money, and resources are limited.

The Music Is On and Popping! Two-way Tables:

This MEA is designed to have teams of 4 students look at data in a two-way table. Teams must discuss which categorical or quantitative factors might be the driving force of a song's popularity. Hopefully, popular songs have some common thread running through them.

Each team must write down their thought process on how they will create the most popular playlist of songs for a local radio station. A major constraint for each team is to thoroughly explain how they will maximize the 11 minutes available with the most popular songs.

Students will be provided with letters from a local radio station, WMMM - where you can receive your "Daily Mix of Music and Math." WMMM has 10 songs and the researchers have collected data on each. Student teams: it is your responsibility to pick the playlist and write a letter to the station supporting why you made your particular selection. The winning team gets an opportunity to record a sound bite which introduces their playlist on the radio.

Now, just when the teams believe they have addressed WMMM's request, a twist is thrown in the midst, and the student teams must return to the drawing board and write a second letter to the station which may or may not affect the team's original playlist.

Do you have the musical swag to connect the associations?

Turning Tires Model Eliciting Activity:

The Turning Tires MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best tire material for certain situations. The main focus of the MEA is applying geometric concepts through modeling.

Which Brand of Chocolate Chip Cookie Would You Buy?:

In this activity, students will utilize measurement data provided in a chart to calculate areas, volumes, and densities of cookies. They will then analyze their data and determine how these values can be used to market a fictitious brand of chocolate chip cookie. Finally, they will integrate cost and taste into their analyses and generate a marketing campaign for a cookie brand of their choosing based upon a set sample data which has been provided to them.

Winner! Winner! - Expected Values:

County Fairs and Carnivals are wonderful. The smell of the food, the thrill of the rides, and the chance to win prizes make for a perfect combination.

Winner! Winner! is an activity about the Carnival coming to town with seven (7) exciting games: Rolling Dice, Bottle Bowling, Fish Bowl, Weigh in on That!, Pin the Wing, Colors, and Spin It! Student groups must look at the cost, rules, and awarded prizes in order to give the best rank order for these games. The groups will be expected to give details on the procedures they used to develop their ranking order. Furthermore, students will be expected to calculate the expected values of the Rolling Dice game and interpret the results in context.

All of a sudden more information is collected about these Carnival Games and now the savvy students must use this information to either revise or rewrite their procedures. Then, when the students are ready to attack this new dilemma, they will encounter Andy, a Carnival Lover, who has had a thrilling time but now discovers his funds are running low. Which games will the students select for Andy and why?

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades 9-12

Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree:

Learn to identify basic trends in the evolutionary history of humans, including walking upright, brain size, jaw size, and tool use in "Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree" online tutorial.

Comparing Mitosis and Meiosis:

Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in this interactive tutorial. You'll also relate them to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.

Untangling Food Webs:

Learn how living organisms can be organized into food webs and how energy is transferred through a food web from producers to consumers to decomposers. This interactive tutorial also includes interactive knowledge checks.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Untangling Food Webs:

Learn how living organisms can be organized into food webs and how energy is transferred through a food web from producers to consumers to decomposers. This interactive tutorial also includes interactive knowledge checks.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comparing Mitosis and Meiosis:

Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in this interactive tutorial. You'll also relate them to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree:

Learn to identify basic trends in the evolutionary history of humans, including walking upright, brain size, jaw size, and tool use in "Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree" online tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.