LAFS.7.W.1.2

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
  3. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 7
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 4: Extended Thinking &Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1001040: M/J Language Arts 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001050: M/J Language Arts 2 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002010: M/J Language Arts 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1006010: M/J Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1007010: M/J Speech and Debate 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)
1009040: M/J Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1100000: M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700010: M/J Research 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700060: M/J Career Research and Decision Making (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7810012: Access M/J Language Arts 2  (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1400025: M/J Peers as Partners in Learning (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2a: Organize ideas, concepts and information (using definition, classification, comparison/contrast and cause/effect).
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2b: Introduce a topic clearly, previewing information to follow and summarizing stated focus.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2c: Develop the topic (add additional information related to the topic) with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations or other information and examples.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2d: Use transitional words, phrases and clauses that connect ideas and create cohesion within writing.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2e: Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2f: Maintain a consistent style and voice throughout writing (e.g., third person for formal style, accurate and efficient word choice, sentence fluency and voice should be active versus passive).
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2g: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information presented.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2h: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details and examples.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.2i: Report on a topic, with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details that support the main ideas.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Introducing the Storyboard:

The student will explain what the argument in the assigned article is and how well the writer supported his or her argument. The student will write an essay to explain what claims the writer made and gather what support was given or indicate what support was missing. The student will finalize his or her essay with an evaluation of the strength of the argument based on the evidence.

Type: Formative Assessment

Concluding with Confidence:

The student will read informational text and create the concluding slide for a slide presentation informing the reader of an event in history as recorded in Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Student will be sure that the concluding statement or section follows from and supports the information presented in the rest of the presentation.

Type: Formative Assessment

Developing with Design:

The student will examine an excerpt from the informational text, Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and create three informational slides for a slide presentation summarizing key ideas from the text. Student will develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other important information and examples.

Type: Formative Assessment

Letter to a Freedom Walker:

The student will read an excerpt from an informational text and write a letter to a character in the article. The student will establish and maintain a formal style of writing throughout the letter.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Gr. 7 Lesson 2-The Everglades and Aquifers:

Students will be able to explain what an aquifer is and why aquifers are important for us and the Everglades. Students will also be able to explain how aquifers can become polluted. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Gr. 7 Lesson 1-Discovering What Wetlands Do:

Students will be able to 

  • Describe how human impacts have had an effect on the Everglades, such as water quality and altered flow of water 
  • Explain 3 important wetlands functions 
  • Write an informative text to examine the multi-step procedures and how they relate to human impacts on the Everglades using new vocabulary in context 

Type: Lesson Plan

Child Soldiers Lesson 3: Research Paper:

In this lesson, students will conduct research and write a formal paper on child soldiers. Students will learn about primary and secondary sources and how to determine the credibility of their sources. The teacher will provide support on how students should record their citations and how to take notes on note cards. This is part three of a three-part lesson on child soldiers.

Unit overview: This unit will guide students though the process of reading multiple texts to develop knowledge about the topic of child soldiers and will culminate in a final research project. The first lesson focuses on news articles while the second lesson concentrates on one former child soldier's story as portrayed through interviews and his music. As a whole, the unit integrates close reading of multiple sources with speaking and listening activities and provides students with opportunities to write routinely from sources throughout the unit. The unit provides ample occasions for students to read, evaluate, and analyze complex texts as well as routine writing opportunities that encourage reflection.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Story Elements in the Classic Love Story "Pyramus and Thisbe":

"Pyramus and Thisbe" is a tragic love story in which two lovers are separated by forces seemingly beyond their control. This lesson guides students through an analysis of the story elements and how they function together to create a theme. A plot diagram helps students to analyze this classic story after the teacher models analysis on a much simpler, more familiar childrens' story, "Cinderella." Students will write a mini-essay analyzing how the plot elements and symbols support the story's theme.  There is a grading rubric and sample essay provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

One Wicked Walrus, a Careless Carpenter, and Oblivious Oysters:

In this lesson, which is part 2 in a series, students will study the seemingly innocuous poem "The Walrus and the Carpenter" by Lewis Carroll and analyze the plot sequence and main character attributes that lead to the ultimate demise of all those silly little oysters! The students will complete a plot organizer, answer text-dependent questions relating to the plot and character development, and write an essay at the end of the lesson to further analyze the characters in the poem. Graphic organizers and answer keys, text-dependent questions and a key, and the writing prompt and rubric are all included with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: The Secrets Behind What You Eat:

This close reading exemplar uses an excerpt from Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma: The Secrets Behind What You Eat. The goal of this two day exemplar from Student Achievement Partners web resources is to give students the opportunity to use reading and writing habits to unpack Pollan's investigative journalism of industrial farms. By reading and rereading the passage closely combined with classroom discussion about it, students will identify why and how farming practices have changed, as well as identify Pollan's point of view on the subject. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will begin to appreciate investigative journalism, as well as question from where their food is coming.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: My Mother, the Scientist:

The goal of this three day exemplar from Student Achievement Partner web resources is to give students the opportunity to use reading and writing habits to absorb deep lessons from Charles Hirshberg's recollections of his mother. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussions about the text, students will identify how much his mother's struggles and accomplishments meant to both Hirshberg and the wider world. When combined with writing about the passage, and possibly pairing this exemplar study with Richard Feynman's memoir "The Making of a Scientist," students will discover how much they can learn from this mixed genre memoir/biography about what inspires life choices.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing and Contrasting an Organizational Pattern:

Students investigate picture books organized in comparison/contrast structures to discover methods of organization and the ways authors use transitions to guide readers. Students can then decide what organizational patterns and transitional words work best to accomplish their individual purposes in writing and apply those to their papers. This lesson is designed to be used during a unit when students are writing a comparison/contrast paper. It will be most helpful prior to drafting, but it could also be useful during revision.

Type: Lesson Plan

User Beware: Foreshadowing and Morals in "The Monkey's Paw":

In this lesson, students will read "The Monkey's Paw" by W.W. Jacobs. They will answer text-dependent questions that include having students analyze the text for foreshadowing clues, as well as use of situational irony. Students will use context clues and dictionaries to determine the meanings of selected vocabulary words from the story. Students will also work to determine morals in the story and will write two extended response paragraphs articulating the moral and how each is developed and supported by textual details. A PowerPoint on theme versus morals, foreshadowing, and situational irony is provided to help students with these concepts. Text-dependent questions, an answer key, a vocabulary handout, a teacher's guide for the story, and a rubric for the summative assessment are provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

"A Retrieved Reformation" by O. Henry - Inference and Evidence:

Students will read O. Henry's "A Retrieved Reformation" and be able to analyze elements of the story, such as foreshadowing and inference, by identifying supporting details in a text. Students will be able to analyze the theme of the text and, in response, write an objective summary with textual evidence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Edgar Allan Poe: A Life in Poetry:

In this lesson, students will be introduced to the life of Edgar Allan Poe and some of his poetic works through a series of interactive activities while working together within a cooperative learning environment. Students will analyze and discuss various nuances of Poe's life and poems and write an explanatory essay about what they learned.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ranking Banking:

In this activity, the students are given specifics and data tables to figure out which banking institution best fits the needs of the customer. Student have to figure out the company's monthly banking activities and use this information to rank the banks provided in the table(s) to determine which bank will give them the most service for the least cost. The twist adds a new situation to take into consideration that may or may not change their original recommendation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Government Knows Best!:

Government take over is upon the United States--well, it is in the short story "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr! In this lesson, students in your classroom will question if we are all treated equally and if we really want equality "every which way." This close reading lesson allows students to explore cause and effect relationships in this engaging, dystopian short story. Students are also challenged to compare the messages in "Harrison Bergeron" with the poem "Government of Evil." Graphic organizers, text-dependent questions, answer keys, and a writing rubric for the summative assessment are included with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Unit/Lesson Sequence

The Black Snowman, An Interdisciplinary Unit:

This lesson will involve work in oral language, concepts of print, spelling, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing with the use of one book, The Black Snowman.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Ranking Banking:

In this activity, the students are given specifics and data tables to figure out which banking institution best fits the needs of the customer. Student have to figure out the company's monthly banking activities and use this information to rank the banks provided in the table(s) to determine which bank will give them the most service for the least cost. The twist adds a new situation to take into consideration that may or may not change their original recommendation.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

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