LAFS.6.W.1.1

Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  1. Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
  2. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
  4. Establish and maintain a formal style.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 6
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
0800000: M/J Health Grade 6 Year (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0800030: M/J Health Grade 6 Semester (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1001010: M/J Language Arts 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001020: M/J Language Arts 1 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002000: M/J Language Arts 1 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1006000: M/J Journalism 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)
1007000: M/J Speech and Debate 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021 (current), 2021 and beyond)
1009030: M/J Writing 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 and beyond (current))
1100000: M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700000: M/J Research 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700060: M/J Career Research and Decision Making (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7810011: Access M/J Language Arts 1  (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1007025: M/J Speech and Debate (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2019, 2019 and beyond (current))
0800005: M/J Health & Career Planning Grade 6 Year (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0800035: M/J Health Grade 6 Semester and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1a: Write an introduction that introduces the writer’s claim within an argument.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1b: Create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s claim.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1c: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence from credible sources.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1d: Use words, phrases and clauses to link claims and reasons.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1e: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows the argument presented.
LAFS.6.W.1.AP.1f: Distinguish claims presented orally or in writing that are supported by reasons and claims that are not.

Related Resources

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Original Student Tutorials

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Tutorial

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Unit/Lesson Sequence

Investigating a Mystery in "Chasing Vermeer":

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STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

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In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, students will research a list of companies to invest in through purchasing stocks. Students will calculate the amount invested and readjust their investment choices.

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Fancy Fractions Catering Company will be hosting a party and need your help to make it happen! Your help is needed to find out how much of each ingredient is needed to feed 200 people and the most economical way of doing this (Brand name brands or store brand). You also have the option of omitting up to three ingredients from the recipe.

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Students develop a procedure to select a cell phone based on qualities they think their parents value in a cell phone. Students present their solution in writing to a marketing company, who wishes to use the results to market cell phones to parents of elementary students.

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In this MEA students will continue to explore and discuss the problems faced when soil is weathered and eroded away. Through the activity they will explore one of many solutions to this issue. They will also gain more perspective on the importance of considering the choices they make daily and how every choice can and does affect the environment.

Orange Juice Conversion:

In this MEA, the students will be able to convert measurements within systems and between systems. They will be able to use problem solving skills to create a process for ranking orange juices for a Bed and Breakfast.

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An environmental conservation group is asked to plant vegetation on existing sand dunes in South Florida to reduce the erosion of the dunes. Group members must decide which vegetation is best to plant.

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In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, the purpose of this lesson is to solve real-world and mathematical problems. Students will also use operations with multi-digit decimals to solve problems. They will write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. Students will engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

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In this Model Eliciting Activity, MEA, the purpose of this lesson is to provide students with the opportunity to solve real-world problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of multi-digit decimals. They will write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

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The students will create a package list for a travel company. They must use all operations with decimals as well as compare decimals.

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

Go For the Gold: Writing Claims & Using Evidence:

Learn how to define and identify claims being made within a text. This tutorial will also show you how evidence can be used effectively to support the claim being made. Lastly, this tutorial will help you write strong, convincing claims of your own.

State Your Claim:

Learn how to state your claim effectively in this interactive tutorial. This argumentative writing lesson will also teach you how to capture readers' attention using "grabbers" before stating your claim.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Go For the Gold: Writing Claims & Using Evidence:

Learn how to define and identify claims being made within a text. This tutorial will also show you how evidence can be used effectively to support the claim being made. Lastly, this tutorial will help you write strong, convincing claims of your own.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

State Your Claim:

Learn how to state your claim effectively in this interactive tutorial. This argumentative writing lesson will also teach you how to capture readers' attention using "grabbers" before stating your claim.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

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Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.