MAFS.6.SP.1.1

Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. For example, “How old am I?” is not a statistical question, but “How old are the students in my school?” is a statistical question because one anticipates variability in students’ ages.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 6
Domain-Subdomain: Statistics & Probability
Cluster: Level 1: Recall
Cluster: Develop understanding of statistical variability. (Additional Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Content Complexity Rating: Level 1: Recall - More Information
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications

  • Assessment Limits :

    N/A

  • Calculator :

    No

  • Context :

    Required

Sample Test Items (2)

  • Test Item #: Sample Item 2
  • Question: Amir collected data from his sixth-grade class at Liberty Middle School. 

    Which question could Amir ask as a statistical question?

     

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1205010: M/J Grade 6 Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1205020: M/J Grade 6 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020, 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1204000: M/J Foundational Skills in Mathematics 6-8 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
0800000: M/J Health Grade 6 Year (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
0800030: M/J Health Grade 6 Semester (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2105030: M/J Advanced World Cultures (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106010: M/J Civics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106015: M/J Civics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106016: M/J Civics & Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106020: M/J Civics, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106025: M/J Civics, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106026: M/J Civics, Advanced & Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2106030: M/J Law Studies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
7812015: Access M/J Grade 6 Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
2106029: M/J Civics and Digital Technologies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
7912110: Fundamental Explorations in Mathematics 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
2003030: M/J STEM Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2002200: M/J STEM Environmental Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2001025: M/J STEM Astronomy and Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2000025: M/J STEM Life Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2109015: M/J World History and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
2109025: M/J World History, Advanced and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
0800005: M/J Health & Career Planning Grade 6 Year (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond)
7821024: Access M/J World History and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2019 and beyond)
0800035: M/J Health Grade 6 Semester and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.6.SP.1.AP.1a: Identify statistical questions and make a plan for data collection.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 3 - Sixth Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for sixth grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 1 - Sixth Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for sixth grade.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Questions About a Class:

Students are asked to determine whether or not questions are statistical and justify their responses.

Type: Formative Assessment

TV Statistics:

Students are asked to write a statistical question and explain why it is statistical.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Currents and Temperature:

Students will construct graphs from existing weather data sets establishing statistical relationships between air temperature over land in proximity to large bodies of warm water with continuous currents, and construct a model to visually support causality for those relationships. Students will be able to understand that ocean currents can have an effect on local weather conditions, influencing temperature (and precipitation with extended lesson), and use that understanding to make plausible explanations for the differences in temperature and precipitation between two geographically close Florida cities of a similar latitude.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyze Data:

This lesson uses statistical analysis to evaluate data. The data used is from the app created by the students in lesson 2 of the Data Set and Statistics Unit. This lesson also guides students in recognizing the different types of data collected and how the distribution's shape can be affected when graphed at different intervals in histograms. This is the final lesson in the unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Gather Data For Distribution by Programming an App:

This lesson allow students to gather, calculate, and plot data using both computer code and mathematical equations. In this lesson students will create a pedometer app to demonstrate the understanding of algorithms, components (such as buttons, textboxes, sensors, etc.), and If/Then statements. This lesson uses algebraic equations and random data to access the needed components to store data in a spreadsheet.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sensoring Data:

In this follow up lesson, students will explore data collection using the weather station sensor and perform statistical analysis of the data. Students will use a scientific method of inquiry to plan an investigation of their own. This activity is meant to allow students to use a variety of skills they have acquired throughout a statistics unit in a personally meaningful way.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sensoring Data:

In this follow up lesson, students will explore data collection using the weather station sensor and perform statistical analysis of the data. Students will use a scientific method of inquiry to plan an investigation of their own. This activity is meant to allow students to use a variety of skills they have acquired throughout a statistics unit in a personally meaningful way.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exotic Tadpole Explosion!:

Inquiry based challenge to develop a plan to investigate a large tadpole population growth in the town of Belle Pole. Students analyze preexisting data and make conclusions about the data. Student groups compare their approaches and conclusions with other student groups. A whole group discussion leads students to conclude that results often varied based on methods used to conduct the same investigation. The lesson ends with students writing a self reflection from their student group and whole group discussions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Statistical Question Sort:

In this lesson, students will explore statistical questions. Students will be able to create statistical questions and understand when a question is non-statistical. This lesson incorporates a YouTube video, direct instruction, and a question sort. By the end of the lesson, students will be able to write their own statistical questions for future statistical lessons.

Type: Lesson Plan

Survey Says:

This lesson addresses statistical and non-statistical questions. The hook will be getting the students talking about what is exciting about show "The Family Feud" and how the questions on the show are examples of statistical questions because they yield numerical answers that vary from one individual to another. The students will have several attempts to identify statistical or non-statistical questions.

Type: Lesson Plan

What is a Question?:

Students will learn how to recognize and formulate a statistical question. After a statistical question is established, students will engage in collecting data from their classmates. The lesson concludes with student presentations of analyzed data and conclusions about the topic selected.

Type: Lesson Plan

Statistical Questions and Variability:

This lesson helps the student identify and write statistical questions and determine the variability based on the collected data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Calculating the Mean, Median, Mode, and Range from a Frequency Chart:

This lesson lasts a total of two hours: 15-minute pre-lesson, 90-minute lesson, and 15-minute follow up lesson or homework. Students will need the two worksheets, a mini-whiteboard, a pen, and an eraser. Each small group will need both card sets, a large sheet of paper, and a glue stick. Students will generate responses to a question about favorite computer games and use this data for the lesson. Students will then work collaboratively to display different data and discuss various strategy approaches.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the Question?:

This lesson introduces students to statistical questions with answer variability versus non-statistical questions with singular answers. Students will identify and create questions of both types, as well as those that correlate to a given set of data presented as a bar graph. Students will also create bar graphs to represent a statistical question and a non-statistical question.

Type: Lesson Plan

Statistically Speaking Part II: An Investigation of Statistical Questions and Data Distribution:

This lesson is Part 2 of 2 and uses the inquiry based learning method to help students recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data. Through cooperative learning activities, the students will develop an understanding of how to analyze the collected data to answer a statistical question. Students will complete a statistical research project in teams. Since this lesson focuses on math concepts related to identifying clusters, gaps, outliers and overall shape of a line plot, it will help students build a strong foundation for future concepts in the statistics and probability domain. The corresponding lesson is Statistically Speaking Part I: An Investigation of Statistical Questions and Data Distribution, Resource ID 48649.

Type: Lesson Plan

Statistical Question?:

The lesson will start by assessing prior knowledge about asking questions that have variability. To hook the students, the teacher will ask students questions to which they must decide if they are statistical or non-statistical. Finally, the teacher will ask for students to volunteer questions so the class can discuss why or why not the question is statistical.

Type: Lesson Plan

Statistically Speaking Part I: An Investigation of Statistical Questions and Data Distribution:

This lesson is Part 1 of 2 and uses the inquiry-based learning method to help students recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data. Through cooperative learning activities, the students will develop an understanding of how to analyze the data collected to answer a statistical question. Since this lesson focuses on math concepts related to identifying clusters, gaps, outliers and overall shape of a line plot, it will help students build a strong foundation for future concepts in the statistics and probability domain. The corresponding lesson Resource ID is: 49091

Type: Lesson Plan

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Determining Remote Locations with Math:

Ecologist, Rebecca Means, describes the process of determining remote locations in the USA and developing quantitative questions that are appropriate.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Problem-Solving Tasks

How Long is 30 Seconds?:

The purpose of this task is for students to gain a better understanding of the passage of time. Students with the help of their teacher should work to design an investigation to find out how successful the class is at predicting when 30 seconds has passed. Once the data is recorded students should begin to graph their findings to make comparisons.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Buttons: Statistical Questions:

Students are given a context and a series of questions and are asked to identify whether each question is statistical and to provide their reasoning. Students are asked to compose an original statistical question for the given context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Teaching Idea

Measures of Central Tendency (Middle School):

"Students compute the measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode) and range and determine how outliers affect the measures." from the Beacon Learning Center.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resource

Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On: Busy Stretch for Large Earthquakes:

This article is intended to support reading in the content area. The text investigates whether the number of large magnitude earthquakes has significantly increased. The article explores the challenge of trying to determine why the amount and intensity of earthquakes can vary across time. The text also briefly explores the recent rise in man-made earthquakes.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Statistical questions:

Discover what makes a question a "statistical question"?

Type: Tutorial

Mean:

This tutorial will help the learners with their understanding of how to find the mean by equally distributing picture objects and using a standard algorithm.

Type: Tutorial

MFAS Formative Assessments

Questions About a Class:

Students are asked to determine whether or not questions are statistical and justify their responses.

TV Statistics:

Students are asked to write a statistical question and explain why it is statistical.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Task

Buttons: Statistical Questions:

Students are given a context and a series of questions and are asked to identify whether each question is statistical and to provide their reasoning. Students are asked to compose an original statistical question for the given context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorial

Statistical questions:

Discover what makes a question a "statistical question"?

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Task

Buttons: Statistical Questions:

Students are given a context and a series of questions and are asked to identify whether each question is statistical and to provide their reasoning. Students are asked to compose an original statistical question for the given context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task