MAFS.5.OA.1.2

Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 5
Domain-Subdomain: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Cluster: Level 1: Recall
Cluster: Write and interpret numerical expressions. (Additional Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Content Complexity Rating: Level 1: Recall - More Information
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications

  • Assessment Limits :
    Expressions may contain whole numbers or fractions with a denominator of 10 or less. Expressions may not include nested parentheses. Multiplication cross symbol is the only acceptable symbol for multiplication. The multiplication dot (•) may not be used. When grouping symbols are part of the expression, the associative property or distributive property must be found in the expression.
  • Calculator :

    No

  • Context :

    No context

Sample Test Items (3)


Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012070: Grade Five Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7712060: Access Mathematics Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
5012065: Grade 4 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5012015: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 3-5 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.5.OA.1.AP.2a: Write a simple expression for a calculation.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 4 - Fifth Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for fifth grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 3 - Fifth Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for fifth grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 2 - Fifth Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for fifth grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 1 - Fifth Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for fifth grade.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Write the Expression:

Students are presented with a verbal description of a numerical expression and are asked to write the expression and then compare it to a similar expression.

Type: Formative Assessment

Brayden’s Video Game:

Students are asked to write an expression requiring more than one operation and the use of parentheses to model a word problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

How Much Greater Is The Product?:

Students are asked to model an expression that is a multiple of a sum and to compare the expression to the sum.

Type: Formative Assessment

Comparing Products:

Students are asked to analyze and compare two related products.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Gummy vs. Gum (Number Pattern):

"In this lesson, students use gummy bears and sticks of gum to discover a number pattern and write an equation that describes it. This lesson should be conducted after students have worked with patterns and one- and two-step equations." from the Beacon Learning Center.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sunshine Beach Hotel MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) asks students to develop a procedure to select a hurricane shutter company.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Expressions: Not Just for Faces:

Learn how to write mathematical expressions while making faces in this interactive tutorial!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Problem-Solving Tasks

Video Game Scores:

This task asks students to exercise both of these complementary skills, writing an expression in part (a) and interpreting a given expression in (b). The numbers given in the problem are deliberately large and "ugly" to discourage students from calculating Eric's and Leila's scores. The focus of this problem is not on numerical answers, but instead on building and interpreting expressions that could be entered in a calculator or communicated to another student unfamiliar with the context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Seeing is Believing:

The purpose of this task is to help students see that 4×(9+2) is four times as big as (9+2). Though this task may seem very simple, it provides students and teachers with a very useful visual for interpreting an expression without evaluating it because they can see for themselves that 4×(9+2) is four times as big as (9+2).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Comparing Products:

The purpose of this task is to generate a classroom discussion that helps students synthesize what they have learned about multiplication in previous grades. It builds on 3.OA.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide and 4.OA.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Words to Expressions 1:

This problem allows student to see words that can describe the expression from part (c) of "5.OA Watch out for Parentheses." Additionally , the words (add, sum) and (product, multiply) are all strategically used so that the student can see that these words have related meanings.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorials

Translating Expressions with Parentheses:

This Khan Academy tutorial video interprets written statements and writes them as mathematical expressions.

Type: Tutorial

Constructing a Numerical Expression Example:

This Khan Academy tutorial video demonstrates how to write a simple expression from a word problem.

Type: Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Sunshine Beach Hotel MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) asks students to develop a procedure to select a hurricane shutter company.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Brayden’s Video Game:

Students are asked to write an expression requiring more than one operation and the use of parentheses to model a word problem.

Comparing Products:

Students are asked to analyze and compare two related products.

How Much Greater Is The Product?:

Students are asked to model an expression that is a multiple of a sum and to compare the expression to the sum.

Write the Expression:

Students are presented with a verbal description of a numerical expression and are asked to write the expression and then compare it to a similar expression.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades K-5

Expressions: Not Just for Faces:

Learn how to write mathematical expressions while making faces in this interactive tutorial!

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Expressions: Not Just for Faces:

Learn how to write mathematical expressions while making faces in this interactive tutorial!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Problem-Solving Tasks

Video Game Scores:

This task asks students to exercise both of these complementary skills, writing an expression in part (a) and interpreting a given expression in (b). The numbers given in the problem are deliberately large and "ugly" to discourage students from calculating Eric's and Leila's scores. The focus of this problem is not on numerical answers, but instead on building and interpreting expressions that could be entered in a calculator or communicated to another student unfamiliar with the context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Seeing is Believing:

The purpose of this task is to help students see that 4×(9+2) is four times as big as (9+2). Though this task may seem very simple, it provides students and teachers with a very useful visual for interpreting an expression without evaluating it because they can see for themselves that 4×(9+2) is four times as big as (9+2).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Comparing Products:

The purpose of this task is to generate a classroom discussion that helps students synthesize what they have learned about multiplication in previous grades. It builds on 3.OA.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide and 4.OA.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Words to Expressions 1:

This problem allows student to see words that can describe the expression from part (c) of "5.OA Watch out for Parentheses." Additionally , the words (add, sum) and (product, multiply) are all strategically used so that the student can see that these words have related meanings.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorials

Translating Expressions with Parentheses:

This Khan Academy tutorial video interprets written statements and writes them as mathematical expressions.

Type: Tutorial

Constructing a Numerical Expression Example:

This Khan Academy tutorial video demonstrates how to write a simple expression from a word problem.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

Video Game Scores:

This task asks students to exercise both of these complementary skills, writing an expression in part (a) and interpreting a given expression in (b). The numbers given in the problem are deliberately large and "ugly" to discourage students from calculating Eric's and Leila's scores. The focus of this problem is not on numerical answers, but instead on building and interpreting expressions that could be entered in a calculator or communicated to another student unfamiliar with the context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Seeing is Believing:

The purpose of this task is to help students see that 4×(9+2) is four times as big as (9+2). Though this task may seem very simple, it provides students and teachers with a very useful visual for interpreting an expression without evaluating it because they can see for themselves that 4×(9+2) is four times as big as (9+2).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Comparing Products:

The purpose of this task is to generate a classroom discussion that helps students synthesize what they have learned about multiplication in previous grades. It builds on 3.OA.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide and 4.OA.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Words to Expressions 1:

This problem allows student to see words that can describe the expression from part (c) of "5.OA Watch out for Parentheses." Additionally , the words (add, sum) and (product, multiply) are all strategically used so that the student can see that these words have related meanings.

Type: Problem-Solving Task