SC.8.N.1.1

Define a problem from the eighth grade curriculum using appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigations of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 8
Body of Knowledge: Nature of Science
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Big Idea: The Practice of Science -

A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation.

B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of "the scientific method."

C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.

D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: MC item(s)
  • Also Assesses
    SC.6.N.1.1
    Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

    SC.6.N.1.3 Explain the difference between an experiment and other types of scientific investigation, and explain the relative benefits and limitations of each.

    SC.7.N.1.1 Define a problem from the seventh grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

    SC.7.N.1.3 Distinguish between an experiment (which must involve the identification and control of variables) and other forms of scientific investigation and explain that not all scientific knowledge is derived from experimentation.

    SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

    SC.8.N.1.3 Use phrases such as “results support” or “fail to support” in science, understanding that science does not offer conclusive ‘proof’ of a knowledge claim.

    SC.8.N.1.4 Explain how hypotheses are valuable if they lead to further investigations, even if they turn out not to be supported by the data.

  • Clarification :
    Students will evaluate a scientific investigation using evidence of scientific thinking and/or problem solving.

    Students will identify test variables (independent variables) and/or outcome variables (dependent variables) in a given scientific investigation.

    Students will interpret and/or analyze data to make predictions and/or defend conclusions.

    Students will distinguish between an experiment and other types of scientific investigations where variables cannot be controlled.

    Students will explain how hypotheses are valuable.
  • Content Limits :
    Items addressing hypotheses will not assess whether the hypothesis is supported by data.

    Items will not address or assess replication, repetition, or the difference between replication and repetition.

    Items will not assess the reason for differences in data across groups that are investigating the same problem.
  • Stimulus Attributes :
    Scenarios in items will be limited to those familiar to a middle-school student rather than global situations.

    The term test variable should be followed by (independent variable) and the term outcome variable should be followed by (dependent variable).
  • Response Attributes :
    The term test variable should be followed by (independent variable) and the term outcome variable should be followed by (dependent variable).
  • Prior Knowledge :
    Items may require the student to apply science knowledge described in the NGSSS from lower grades. This benchmark requires prerequisite knowledge from SC.3.N.1.1, SC.3.N.1.3, SC.4.N.1.1, SC.4.N.1.6, SC.5.N.1.1, SC.5.N.1.2, SC.5.N.1.4, and SC.5.N.1.5.
Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question: Keesha did an experiment to study the rate of photosynthesis in the water plant Elodea. She placed a piece of Elodea in a beaker of water and set the beaker 10 centimeters (cm) from a light source. Keesha counted the bubbles released from the plant every minute for five minutes (min). She repeated the process two more times. First, she moved the light to 20 cm from the beaker, and then she moved the light to 30 cm from the beaker. Keesha’s setup and data are shown below.
    what is the outcome variable (dependent variable) in this experiment?
  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2002100: M/J Comprehensive Science 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002110: M/J Comprehensive Science 3, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001010: M/J Earth/Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001020: M/J Earth/Space Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000010: M/J Life Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000020: M/J Life Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2003010: M/J Physical Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2003020: M/J Physical Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1700020: M/J Research 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7820017: Access M/J Comprehensive Science 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2002085: M/J Comprehensive Science 2 Accelerated Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.8.N.1.In.1: Identify a problem from the eighth grade curriculum, use reference materials to gather information, carry out an experiment, collect and record data, and report results.
SC.8.N.1.Su.1: Recognize a problem from the eighth grade curriculum, use materials to gather information, conduct a simple experiment, and record and share results.
SC.8.N.1.Pa.1: Recognize a problem related to the eighth grade curriculum, observe and explore objects and activities, and recognize a solution.

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