SC.2.E.7.5

State the importance of preparing for severe weather, lightning, and other weather related events.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 2
Body of Knowledge: Earth and Space Science
Idea: Level 1: Recall
Big Idea: Earth Systems and Patterns - Humans continue to explore the interactions among water, air, and land. Air and water are in constant motion that results in changing conditions that can be observed over time.
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Content Complexity Rating: Level 1: Recall - More Information
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020030: Science - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7720030: Access Science Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.2.E.7.In.5: Identify harmful consequences of being outside in severe weather, such as lightning, hurricanes, or tornados.
SC.2.E.7.Su.5: Recognize reasons for staying inside during severe weather, such as hurricanes and thunderstorms.
SC.2.E.7.Pa.4: Recognize where to go to avoid severe weather, such as thunder and lightning.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Be Prepared Industries MEA:

In this MEA, students are being asked to rank which severe weather survival kit would be best to use for people preparing for severe weather conditions.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

No Kidding Hurricane Kit:

Children are challenged to create hurricane kits from a list of $5 supplies and a fixed budget. In a twist, students are asked to revise their kits to account for diverse families including families with young children, families with elderly adults, and families with pets. They are given an increased budget and a checklist for each type of kit.  The expectation is that students can determine which supplies would be useful in an emergency hurricane kit and that they can skip-count by 5’s to make sure they stay within their budgets.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the Weather?:

In this lesson, students use daily observations, videos, and activities to learn about meteorology and the changing nature of weather. Students also identify weather events that are commonly reported in the news and discuss how weather affects lives.

Type: Lesson Plan

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Weather Measure:

In this unit, students learn about meteorology and act as meteorologists, predict and take temperature measurements, and create a severe weather preparedness plan.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Video/Audio/Animation

Tornado Chaser Footage:

To an outsider, chasing storms probably seems like a lot of boring periods of waiting for conditions to become evident, followed by a few moments of sheer excitement or terror. On the other hand, tornado researchers find that the effort and expenses they put into chasing down a single tornado-producing storm reflect the importance of such events, especially in terms of impact on lives and property. These NOVA-adapted video clips include footage of scientists who study supercells and the tornadoes they spawn, highlighting what they already know about these storms, and what they still want to know about how they form.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

The Disaster Area: FEMA for Kids:

Through this website, students learn about different weather disasters and what to do before, during, and after an emergency.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Be Prepared Industries MEA:

In this MEA, students are being asked to rank which severe weather survival kit would be best to use for people preparing for severe weather conditions.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

No Kidding Hurricane Kit:

Children are challenged to create hurricane kits from a list of $5 supplies and a fixed budget. In a twist, students are asked to revise their kits to account for diverse families including families with young children, families with elderly adults, and families with pets. They are given an increased budget and a checklist for each type of kit.  The expectation is that students can determine which supplies would be useful in an emergency hurricane kit and that they can skip-count by 5’s to make sure they stay within their budgets.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Video/Audio/Animation

Tornado Chaser Footage:

To an outsider, chasing storms probably seems like a lot of boring periods of waiting for conditions to become evident, followed by a few moments of sheer excitement or terror. On the other hand, tornado researchers find that the effort and expenses they put into chasing down a single tornado-producing storm reflect the importance of such events, especially in terms of impact on lives and property. These NOVA-adapted video clips include footage of scientists who study supercells and the tornadoes they spawn, highlighting what they already know about these storms, and what they still want to know about how they form.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

The Disaster Area: FEMA for Kids:

Through this website, students learn about different weather disasters and what to do before, during, and after an emergency.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Virtual Manipulative

The Disaster Area: FEMA for Kids:

Through this website, students learn about different weather disasters and what to do before, during, and after an emergency.

Type: Virtual Manipulative