The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address


Resource ID#: 126549 Primary Type: Original Student Tutorial

Attachments

Accessible Version: Accessible version of the tutorial content in pdfformat

General Information

Subject(s): Social Studies, English Language Arts
Grade Level(s): 11, 12
Intended Audience: Students
Resource supports reading in content area:Yes
Keywords: Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address, Civil War, diction, author's purpose, parallel structure
Instructional Component Type(s): Original Student Tutorial

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