Cluster 3: Interpret linear models. (Algebra 1 - Major Cluster)

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

General Information
Number: MAFS.912.S-ID.3
Title: Interpret linear models. (Algebra 1 - Major Cluster)
Type: Cluster
Subject: Mathematics
Grade: 912
Domain-Subdomain: Statistics & Probability: Interpreting Categorical & Quantitative Data

Related Standards

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

MAFS.912.S-ID.3.AP.7a
Interpret the meaning of the slope and y-intercept in context.
MAFS.912.S-ID.3.AP.8a
Identify the correlation coefficient (r) of a linear fit.
MAFS.912.S-ID.3.AP.8b
Describe the correlation coefficient (r) of a linear fit (e.g., a strong or weak positive, negative, perfect correlation).
MAFS.912.S-ID.3.AP.9a
Given a correlation in a real-world scenario, determine if there is causation.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Assessments

Sample 4 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 3 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 2 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 1 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is the State Interim Assessment for high school.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Sleep and Reading:

Students are asked to interpret a correlation coefficient in context and describe a possible causal relationship.

Type: Formative Assessment

Listing All Possible Causal Relationships:

Students are asked to identify all possible causal relationships between two correlated variables.

Type: Formative Assessment

Does the Drug Cause Diabetes?:

Students are given a statement of association between two variables and are asked to determine if one variable is a cause of the other.

Type: Formative Assessment

Does Studying Pay?:

Students are given a scenario describing an association between two variables and are asked to determine if one variable is a cause of the other.

Type: Formative Assessment

July December Correlation:

Students are asked to compute and interpret the correlation coefficient for a given set of data.

Type: Formative Assessment

How Big Are Feet?:

Students are asked to compute and interpret the correlation coefficient for a given set of data.

Type: Formative Assessment

Correlation Order:

Students are asked to estimate a correlation coefficient for each of four data sets and then order the coefficients from least to greatest in terms of the strength of relationship.

Type: Formative Assessment

Correlation for Life Expectancy:

Students are asked to compute and interpret the correlation coefficient for a given set of data.

Type: Formative Assessment

Slope for Foot Length Model:

Students are asked to interpret the meaning of the slope of the graph of a linear model.

Type: Formative Assessment

Slope for Life Expectancy:

Students are asked to interpret the meaning of the slope of the graph of a linear model.

Type: Formative Assessment

Intercept for Life Expectancy:

Students are asked to interpret the intercept of a linear model of life expectancy data.

Type: Formative Assessment

Bungee Cord Model:

Students are asked to interpret the meaning of the constant term in a linear model.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Do Credit Cards Make You Gain Weight? What is Correlation, and How to Distinguish It from Causation:

This lesson introduces the students to the concepts of correlation and causation, and the difference between the two. The main learning objective is to encourage students to think critically about various possible explanations for a correlation, and to evaluate their plausibility, rather than passively taking presented information on faith. To give students the right tools for such analysis, the lesson covers most common reasons behind a correlation, and different possible types of causation.

Type: Lesson Plan

"r" you ready to study correlation?:

In this lesson students will determine whether their is a relationship between two variables through a Perspectives Video and real-life examples. Students will learn about confounding variables and investigate why correlation does not imply causation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Compacting Cardboard:

Students with investigate the amount of space that could be saved by flattening cardboard boxes. The analysis includes linear graphs and regression analysis along with discussions of slope and a direct variation phenomenon.

Type: Lesson Plan

You Can Plot it! Bivariate Data:

This review lesson relates graphical and algebraic representations of bivariate data by giving students opportunities to create scatter plots, calculate a regression equation using technology, and interpret the slope and y-intercept of the equation in the context of the data.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Hot Is It?:

This lesson allows the students to connect the science of cricket chirps to mathematics. In this lesson, students will collect real data using the CD "Myths and Science of Cricket Chirps" (or use supplied data), display the data in a graph, and then find and use the mathematical model that fits their data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Basketball - it's a tall man's sport - or is it?:

Basketball is a tall man's sport in most regards. Shooting, rebounding, blocking shots - the taller player seems to have the advantage. But is that still true when shooting free throws?

The students will use the data of NBA players to construct scatter plots to determine if there is a correlation between the height of a basketball player and his free throw percentage. The students will use technology to create the graphs, find the regression line and calculate the correlation coefficient.

Type: Lesson Plan

Height vs. Shoe Size:

This resource provides a single 50-minute period introductory lesson on Correlation, the Correlation Coefficient, and Correlation vs. Causation. The lesson is structured around collecting data from a survey at the beginning of class to be used in creating scatter plots and analyzing them using technology. Students engage in discussion activities that challenge their thoughts on linked variables in the media.

Type: Lesson Plan

Heart Rate and Exercise: Is there a correlation?:

In this lesson, Algebra 1 students will use supplied heart rate data to determine if heart rate and the amount of time spent exercising each week are correlated. Students will create their own scatter plots and lines of best fit for the data and study correlation using GeoGebra. Students will gather evidence to support or refute statistical statements made about correlation. The lesson provides easy to follow steps for using GeoGebra, a free online application, to generate a correlation coefficient for two given variables.

Type: Lesson Plan

Span the Distance Glider - Correlation Coefficient:

This lesson will provide students with an opportunity to collect and analyze bivariate data and use technology to create scatter plots, lines of best fit, and determine the correlation strength of the data being compared. Students will have a hands on inquire based lesson that allows them to create gliders to analyze data. This lesson is an application of skills acquired in a bivariate unit of study.

Type: Lesson Plan

Study of Crowd Ratings at Disney:

In this lesson, students develop a strong use of the vocabulary of correlation by investigating crowd ratings for a month at Disney. Students will find weekly crowd rating regression lines and regression correlations and discuss what this means for a Disney visit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hand Me Your Data:

Students will gather and use data to calculate a line of best fit and correlation coefficient with their classmates' height and hand size. They will use their line of best fit to make approximations.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Will I Pay?:

Who doesn't want to save money? In this lesson, students will learn how a better credit score will save them money. They will use a scatter plot to see the relationship between credit scores and car loan interest rates. They will determine a line of best fit equation and interpret slope and y-intercept to make conclusions about interest and credit scores.

Type: Lesson Plan

What does it mean?:

This lesson provides the students with scatter plots, lines of best fit and the linear equations to practice interpreting the slope and y-intercept in the context of the problem.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why do I have to have a bedtime?:

This is a predict, observe, explain type lesson that allows students to make predictions based on prior knowledge, observe both the teacher and their peers in order to create a discussion, and receive the opportunity to express themselves and their ideas while explaining what they learned. Students will be participating in an activity where they will collect data after making a prediction and then construct a scatter plot. From the scatterplot, students will make an interpretation of the data by calculating the correlation coefficient (r value) and deciding if there is a correlation or not in terms of its strength and magnitude, then explaining what that means.

Type: Lesson Plan

Steel vs. Wooden Roller Coaster Lab:

This lesson is a Follow Up Activity to the Algebra Institute and allows students to apply their skills on analyzing bivariate data. This STEM lesson allows students the opportunity to investigate if there is a linear relationship between a coaster's height and speed. Using technology the students can determine the line of best fit, correlation coefficient and use the line for interpolation. This lesson also uses prior knowledge and has students solve systems of equations graphically to determine which type of coaster is faster.

Type: Lesson Plan

Height Scatterplot Lab:

This lesson is a Follow Up Activity to the Algebra Institute and allows students to apply their skills on analyzing bivariate data. This STEM lesson allows students the opportunity to investigate if there is a linear relationship between a person's height and foot length. Using technology the students can determine the line of best fit, correlation coefficient and use the line for interpolation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Springing into Hooke's Law:

This lab exploration provides students with an opportunity to examine the relationship between the amount a linear spring is stretched and the restoring force that acts to return the spring to its rest length. This concept is central to an understanding of elastic potential energy in mechanical systems and has implications in the study of a large array of mechanical and electromagnetic simple harmonic oscillators.

Type: Lesson Plan

Is My Model Working?:

Students will enjoy this project lesson that allows them to choose and collect their own data. They will create a scatter plot and find their line of best fit. Next they write interpretations of their slope and y-intercept. Their final challenge is to calculate residuals and conclude whether or not their data is consistent with their linear model.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's So Funny About Correlation?:

Students investigate correlation and causation through the medium of cartoons. Students construct arguments in favor of and against causal relationships between two strongly correlated events and decide which one is more reasonable. Students create cartoons representing the idea that correlation does not imply causation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scatter Plots and Correlations:

In this lesson, students will interpret and analyze data to create a scatter plot and line of best fit. Students will make predictions for the number of views of a video for any given number of weeks on the charts.

The lesson provides suggestions for finding the line of best fit using different technologies to graph, GeoGebra free online software, Excel spreadsheets, and graphing calculators. Teachers can determine which technology will best suit their class or incorporate all three as part of the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's Slope got to do with it?:

In this lesson students will interpret the meaning of slope and y-intercept in a wide variety of examples of "real world" situations that are modeled by linear functions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cat Got Your Tongue?:

This lesson will be using real world examples to help explain the meaning of slope and y-intercept of a linear model in the context of data. Literacy will also be infused during the independent practice portion of the lesson. A PowerPoint is included for guidance throughout the whole lesson and to provide visual representation for students. There are guided notes available as well to provide assistance in note-taking for students.

Type: Lesson Plan

Doggie Data: It's a Dog's Life:

This lesson allows students to use real-world data to construct and interpret scatter plots using technology. Students will create a scatter plot with a line of best fit and a function. They describe the relationship of bi-variate data. They recognize and interpret the slope and y-intercept of the line of best fit within the context of the data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scrambled Coefficient:

Students explore correlation of data through an activity allowing them to order situations from negative correlation to positive correlation. Students make an initial prediction of order given just the written situation and make adjustments to the order as each component is introduced: data table and scatter plot, line of best fit, correlation coefficient. Discussion after each step allows students to explain how they change their predictions as they are given more information. At the end of the lesson, students are provided with a real life example of how correlation coefficient is used to determine strength of relationships among real data.

Students will learn how to use the Linear Regression feature of graphing calculators to find the true line of best fit and the correlation coefficient.

The lesson includes the guided card sorting task, a formative assessment, and a summative assessment.

Type: Lesson Plan

Spaghetti Trend:

This lesson consists of using data to make scatter plots, interpret slope and the y-intercept and to make predictions about the line of best fit using the slope intercept form.

Type: Lesson Plan

Slippery Slopes:

This lesson will not only reinforce students understanding of slope and y-intercept, but will also ensure the students understand how it can be modeled in a real world situation. The focus of this lesson is to show student's understanding of slope being a rate of change and the y-intercept the value of y when x is zero. They will be able to read a problem and create a linear equation based upon what they read. They will then make predictions based upon this information.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Gumball Roll Lab:

This lesson is on motion of objects. Students will learn what factors affect the speed of an object through experimentation with gumballs rolling down an incline. The students will collect data through experimenting, create graphs from the data, interpret the slope of the graphs and create equations of lines from data points and the graph. They will understand the relationship of speed and velocity and be able to relate the velocity formula to the slope intercept form of the equation of a line.

Type: Lesson Plan

Correlation or Causation: That is the question:

Students will learn how to analyze whether two events/properties demonstrate a correlation or causation or both. They will learn what factors are involved when evaluating whether or not correlated events demonstrate causation. If two events are claimed to be causal when they are not, they will be able to determine why and which (if any) causal fallacies are present. At the close of the lesson students will be given situational data and develop a newscast that assumes causation when in fact there is no causal link. Students who are observing will analyze each presentation and determine which (if any) causal fallacy was used (or explain why the newscast is correct in their assumption of causality).

Type: Lesson Plan

How technology can make my life easier when graphing:

Students will use GeoGebra software to explore the concept of correlation coefficient in graphical images of scatter plots. They will also learn about numerical and qualitative aspects of the correlation coefficient, and then do a matching activity to connect all of these representations of correlation coefficient. They will use an interactive program file in GeoGebra to manipulate the points to create a certain correlation coefficient. Step by step instructions are included to create the graph in GeoGebra and calculate the correlation coefficient "R."

Type: Lesson Plan

Using Acid/Base Neutralization to Study Endothermic vs Exothermic Reactions and Stoichiometry:

In this lesson, students will experimentally determine whether an acid/base neutralization reaction is endothermic or exothermic. They will also use their results to identify the limiting reactant at various times in the process and calculate the concentration of one of the reactants.

Type: Lesson Plan

Smarter than a Statistician: Correlations and Causation in the Real World!:

Using Cornell Notes and a PowerPoint Presentation, students will learn to distinguish between correlation and causation. They will build their skills by playing two interactive digital games that are included in the lesson. The lesson culminates with a research project that requires students to find and explain the correlation between two real world events.

Type: Lesson Plan

Slope and y-Intercept of a Statistical Model:

After activating prior knowledge and presentation of new skills, students will be collecting and evaluating data to interpret the line of best fit and y-intercept in order to develop an equation in point-slope form to represent the data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Line of Best Fit:

This lesson provides students with opportunities to examine the slope and y-intercept of a line of best fit using scatterplots. Students will gain a deeper conceptual understanding of slope and y-intercept based on real world data. Students will graph scatterplots and draw a line of best fit. Then, students will use the line to interpret the slope and y-intercept with regard to the data. Students will also make predictions using the graph and the equation of the data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Is Milk Killing People?:

Students will explore correlation and causation from data through class discussions of real world examples. They will know positive, negative, strong, and weak correlation. Students make predictions regarding feasibility of causation by analyzing graphs and scatter plots of data.

Students will participate in an experiment where they will generate and analyze their own data. They will come to conclusion regarding variations in data, correlation and causation. Students are encouraged to explain and justify their responses. Teacher will facilitate discussion of leading question to be geared towards the learning objectives.

During the lesson, students will be assessed by several formative assessments and a summative assessment at the conclusion. The lesson includes the a worksheet and data collection sheets to be concluded.

Type: Lesson Plan

Don't Mope Over Slope:

This is an introductory lesson designed to help students have a better understanding of the interpretation of the slope (rate of change) of a graph. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Spaghetti Bridges:

Students use data collection from their spaghetti bridge activity to write linear equations, graph the data, and interpret the data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why Correlations?:

This lesson is an introductory lesson to correlation coefficients. Students will engage in research prior to the teacher giving any direct instruction. The teacher will provide instruction on how to find the correlation coefficient by hand and using Excel.

Type: Lesson Plan

Picture This!:

This is a short unit plan that covers position/time and velocity/time graphs. Students are provided with new material on both topics, will have practice worksheets, and group activities to develop an understanding of motion graphs.

Type: Lesson Plan

Graphing Equations on the Cartesian Plane: Slope:

The lesson teaches students about an important characteristic of lines: their slope. Slope can be determined either in graphical or algebraic form. Slope can also be described as positive, negative, zero, or undefined. Students get an explanation of when and how these different types of slope occur. Finally, students learn how slope relates to parallel and perpendicular lines. When two lines are parallel, they have the same slope and when they are perpendicular their slopes are negative reciprocals of one another. Prerequisite knowledge: Students must know how to graph points on the Cartesian plane. They must be familiar with the x- and y- axes on the plane in both the positive and negative directions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hybrid-Electric Vehicles vs. Gasoline-Powered Vehicles:

Students will be comparing hybrid-electric vehicles (HEV) versus gasoline-powered vehicles. They will research the benefits of owning a HEV while also analyzing the cost effectiveness.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scatter plots, spaghetti, and predicting the future:

Students will construct a scatter plot from given data. They will identify the correlation, sketch an approximate trend line, and find the equation of the trend line. They will explain the meaning of the slope and y-intercept in the context of the data and use the trend line to extrapolate values beyond the data set.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

It's a Slippery Slope!:

Learn what slope is in mathematics and how to calculate it on a graph and with the slope formula in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Experts

Oceanography & Math:

A discussion describing ocean currents studied by a physical oceanographer does and how math is involved. 

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Assessment of Past and Present Rates of Sea Level Change:

In this video, Brad Rosenheim describes how Louisiana sediment cores are used to estimate sea level changes over the last 10,000 years. Video funded by NSF grant #: OCE-1502753.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Analyzing Antarctic Ice Sheet Movement to Understand Sea Level Changes:

In this video, Eugene Domack explains how past Antarctic ice sheet movement rates allow us to understand sea level changes. Video funded by NSF grant #: OCE-1502753.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

PTSD: Correlation vs Causation:

Jens Foell discusses the link between correlation and causation in PTSD patients.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

The Criminal Brain and Correlation vs. Causation:

Florida State Researcher, Jens Foell, discusses the importance of understanding correlation versus causation when researching personality traits and criminal behavior.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiasts

Determining Strengths of Shark Models based on Scatterplots and Regression:

Chip Cotton, fishery biologist, discusses his use of mathematical regression modeling and how well the data fits his models based on  his deep sea shark research.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Slope and Deep Sea Sharks:

Shark researcher, Chip Cotton, discusses the use of regression lines, slope, and determining the strength of the models he uses in his research.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Correlation and Causation in a Scientific Study:

Watching this video will cause your critical thinking skills to improve. You might also have a great day, but that's just correlation.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Problem-Solving Tasks

Golf and Divorce:

This is a simple task addressing the distinction between correlation and causation. Students are given information indicating a correlation between two variables, and are asked to reason out whether or not a causation can be inferred.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Texting and Grades II:

The purpose of this task is to assess ability to interpret the slope and intercept of the least squares regression line in context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Downhill:

This task would be especially well-suited for instructional purposes. Students will benefit from a class discussion about the slope, y-intercept, x-intercept, and implications of the restricted domain for interpreting more precisely what the equation is modeling.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Text Resource

Does Sour Cream Cause Bike Accidents?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Many people are confused about the concept of correlation versus causation. To help demonstrate the misconception in a light and humorous way, this article describes the work of Tyler Vigen. The Harvard student graphs data that are highly correlated but clearly unrelated. The "spurious correlations" help debunk the myth that if there is a correlation, then there is a causal relationship. The article emphasizes that rational human thought is essential to process the relationships and is necessary for studying statistics.

Type: Text Resource

Unit/Lesson Sequences

Sample Algebra 1 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP:

This sample Algebra 1 CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the Algebra 1 Course. The units and standards are customizable and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, worksheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes rows that automatically filter and display Math Formative Assessments System tasks, E-Learning Original Student Tutorials and Perspectives Videos that are aligned to the standards, available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample Algebra 1 CMAP, its features and customizability by watching the following video:

 
 
 

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please click here

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx 

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Linear Functions and Slope:

This session on linear function and slope contains five parts, multiple problems and videos, and interactive activities geared to help students recognize and understand linear relationships, explore slope and dependent and independent variables in graphs of linear relationships, and develop an understanding of rates and how they are related to slopes and equations. Throughout the session, students use spreadsheets to complete the work, and are encouraged to think about the ways technology can aid in teaching and understanding. The solutions for all problems are given, and many allow students to have a hint or tip as they solve. There is even a homework assignment with four problems for students after they have finished all five parts of the session.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Video/Audio/Animation

Linear Equations in the Real World:

Linear equations can be used to solve many types of real-word problems. In this episode, the water depth of a pool is shown to be a linear function of time and an equation is developed to model its behavior. Unfortunately, ace Algebra student A. V. Geekman ends up in hot water anyway.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

Line of Best Fit:

This manipulative allows the user to enter multiple coordinates on a grid, estimate a line of best fit, and then determine the equation for a line of best fit.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorial

It's a Slippery Slope!:

Learn what slope is in mathematics and how to calculate it on a graph and with the slope formula in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Lesson Plan

Do Credit Cards Make You Gain Weight? What is Correlation, and How to Distinguish It from Causation:

This lesson introduces the students to the concepts of correlation and causation, and the difference between the two. The main learning objective is to encourage students to think critically about various possible explanations for a correlation, and to evaluate their plausibility, rather than passively taking presented information on faith. To give students the right tools for such analysis, the lesson covers most common reasons behind a correlation, and different possible types of causation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Correlation and Causation in a Scientific Study:

Watching this video will cause your critical thinking skills to improve. You might also have a great day, but that's just correlation.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Problem-Solving Tasks

Golf and Divorce:

This is a simple task addressing the distinction between correlation and causation. Students are given information indicating a correlation between two variables, and are asked to reason out whether or not a causation can be inferred.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Texting and Grades II:

The purpose of this task is to assess ability to interpret the slope and intercept of the least squares regression line in context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Downhill:

This task would be especially well-suited for instructional purposes. Students will benefit from a class discussion about the slope, y-intercept, x-intercept, and implications of the restricted domain for interpreting more precisely what the equation is modeling.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Video/Audio/Animation

Linear Equations in the Real World:

Linear equations can be used to solve many types of real-word problems. In this episode, the water depth of a pool is shown to be a linear function of time and an equation is developed to model its behavior. Unfortunately, ace Algebra student A. V. Geekman ends up in hot water anyway.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

Line of Best Fit:

This manipulative allows the user to enter multiple coordinates on a grid, estimate a line of best fit, and then determine the equation for a line of best fit.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Correlation and Causation in a Scientific Study:

Watching this video will cause your critical thinking skills to improve. You might also have a great day, but that's just correlation.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Problem-Solving Tasks

Golf and Divorce:

This is a simple task addressing the distinction between correlation and causation. Students are given information indicating a correlation between two variables, and are asked to reason out whether or not a causation can be inferred.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Texting and Grades II:

The purpose of this task is to assess ability to interpret the slope and intercept of the least squares regression line in context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Downhill:

This task would be especially well-suited for instructional purposes. Students will benefit from a class discussion about the slope, y-intercept, x-intercept, and implications of the restricted domain for interpreting more precisely what the equation is modeling.

Type: Problem-Solving Task