Fundamental United States Government   (#7921045)

Version for Academic Year:
The course was/will be terminated at the end of School Year 2016 - 2017

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

Graduation Requirements: Fundamental courses are academic skill-building courses which support a student's participation in general education classes by allowing them more time to build the necessary skills for success. Students with disabilities may earn elective credit towards a standard diploma for the successful completion of a fundamental course.

A student for which the IEP Team has determined the general education curriculum with accommodations and supports is not appropriate but is ineligible to participate in access courses may take fundamental courses to earn credit towards a special diploma, in accordance with the district's student progression plan. These courses are appropriate for these students as general education courses may not be modified for this purpose.


United States Government - The grade 9-12 United States Government course consists of the following content area strands: Geography, Civics and Government. The primary content for the course pertains to the study of government institutions and political processes and their historical impact on American society. Content should include, but is not limited to, the functions and purpose of government, the function of the state, the constitutional framework, federalism, separation of powers, functions of the three branches of government at the local, state and national level, and the political decision-making process.

Mathematics Benchmark Guidance - Social Studies instruction should include opportunities for students to interpret and create representations of historical events and concepts using mathematical tables, charts, and graphs.

Special Notes: Instructional Strategies
  1. Utilize UDL strategies when planning lessons for all students.
  2. Ensure that students have accessible instructional materials.
  3. Ensure that students read from text that varies in length and complexity.
  4. Provide graphic organizers and instruct students on how to use them properly to support understanding of concepts.
  5. Use rubrics for assignments that clearly outline expectations for students.
  6. Make close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons and provide guided practice and immediate feedback in how to do this.
  7. Provide multiple opportunities to practice new vocabulary.
  8. Provide explicit instruction in how students can locate evidence from text to support their answers.
  9. Provide extensive research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence) based on student interest.
  10. Provide students with outlines that assist them in note taking during teacher-led instruction.
  11. Teach students to utilize appropriate graphic organizers or organize thoughts when planning for writing assignments.
Additional content that may be included in the Grade 12 NAEP Civics assessment includes:
  • Distinctive characteristics of American society
  • Unity/diversity in American society
  • Civil society: nongovernmental associations, groups
  • Nation-states
  • Interaction among nation-states
  • United States, major governmental, nongovernmental international organizations
The NAEP frameworks for Civics may be accessed at http://www.nagb.org/publications/frameworks/civicsframework.pdf

General Information

Course Number: 7921045
Course Path:
Abbreviated Title: FUND US GOVERNMENT
Course Length: Semester (S)
Course Status: Terminated

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning — Part Two:

Practice identifying faulty reasoning in this two-part, interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.

Please complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.  

Please complete Part Two after completing this tutorial. Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Eliminating Exotics: Identifying and Assessing Research for Quality and Usefulness:

Explore the topic of invasive exotics in Florida while you learn to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information in research sources, identify authoritative sources from a group of varied resources, and dissect a research question in order to identify keywords for a search of resources. With this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn to use advanced search features to find appropriate sources to address a research question and assess the usefulness of sources when addressing a specific research question. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea:

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that we may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
NEXT GENERATION SUNSHINE STATE STANDARDS

SS.912.C - Civics
Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law, and the American political system.
Standard 2: Evaluate the roles, rights, and responsibilities of United States citizens and determine methods of active participation in society, government, and the political system.
Standard 3: Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, functions, and organization of government.
Standard 4: Demonstrate an understanding of contemporary issues in world affairs, and evaluate the role and impact of United States foreign policy.

SS.912.G - Geography
Standard 4: Understand the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations.
Standard 5: Understand how human actions can impact the environment.