Reading 3   (#1008330)

Version for Academic Year:
The course was/will be terminated at the end of School Year 2020 - 2021

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

The purpose of this course is to increase reading fluency and endurance through integrated experiences in the language arts. This course incorporates reading and analysis of literary and informational selections to develop critical and close reading skills. At the end of 11th grade students are expected to read and comprehend texts in the 11-College and Careen Reading (CCR) grade complexity band proficiently and read texts at the high end of the band with support. At the end of 12th grade students are expected to read and comprehend texts in the grades 11-CCR complexity band independently and proficiently.

General Notes

Important Note: Reading and writing courses should not be used in place of English language arts courses; reading and writing courses are intended to be used to supplement further study in English language arts.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • demonstrating successful reading of argument;
  • demonstrating successful reading of fact and opinion;
  • demonstrating successful reading of high-quality literature;
  • demonstrating knowledge of a variety of organizational patterns and their relationships in the comprehension of text;
  • demonstrating successful understanding of academic vocabulary and vocabulary in context;
  • integrating reading and writing, including written responses to print and digital text;
  • using effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions;
  • collaborating extensively amongst peers.
Special Notes:
Instructional Practices:
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students’ content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.
  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
The College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate at each grade level. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade specific benchmarks, retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades, and work steadily toward meeting the more general expectations described by the CCR anchor standards.

General Information

Course Number: 1008330
Abbreviated Title: READ 3
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Elective Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Unconquered: Exploring Poetry:

Explore the poems "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley and "Life" by Charlotte Bronte in this interactive tutorial. Using these works of literature, you'll practice determining multiple themes in a poem and writing a summary of a poem. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Setting, Characters, Action: Creating Suspense in Dracula:

Read excerpts from Bram Stoker’s famous novel Dracula. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine how the author created suspense by tying together the story elements of setting, characters, and action. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Two Characters are Introduced in Things Fall Apart:

Read the first chapter from Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart about a father and son who couldn't be more different. In this interactive tutorial, you'll identify their important traits, examine the importance of their differences, and explain the impact of the author’s choice to introduce these two characters by highlighting their differences.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 15 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part Three:

Read and study excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia to analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This interactive, English Language Arts tutorial is Part Three of three. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part Two:

Analyze the impact of an author's choices using excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia. In this series of interactive tutorials, you'll analyze the impact of an author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This is the second tutorial in a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reading into Words with Multiple Meanings:

Explore Robert Frost's poem "Mending Wall" and examine words, phrases, and lines with multiple meanings. In this interactive tutorial you'll analyze how these multiple meanings can affect a reader’s interpretation of the poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Impact of an Author's Choices -- Part One:

Read and study excerpts from Willa Cather's classic novel My Antonia to analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding the selection of the narrator, where the story is set, and how the main character is introduced and developed. 

This interactive, English Language Arts tutorial is Part One of three. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Beauty and Word Choice – Part Two: "A Dream Within a Dream":

Explore Edgar Allan Poe's "A Dream Within a Dream" in this two-part series of interactive tutorials. In Part Two, you'll examine word choices, rhyme, and personification, and explain the impact of specific word choices on the meaning and beauty of the poem.

Click HERE to launch Part One before starting Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Beauty and Word Choice – Part One: "A Dream Within a Dream":

Explore Edgar Allan Poe's "A Dream Within a Dream" in this two-part series of interactive tutorials. In Part 1, you'll examine words with multiple meanings and make inferences about selected key words in the poem. By the end of this series, you should be able to explain the impact of specific word choices on the meaning and beauty of the poem. 

After you complete Part One, click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Color and Connotation in Ray Bradbury's "The Veldt":

Study excerpts from a suspenseful, science fiction short story in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you'll study excerpts from "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury. You'll study his use of color imagery, learn about the connotations of particular colors, and analyze the impact of color imagery on the meaning of the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Determining Point of View and Its Effect on a Text:

Read excerpts from E.B. White's moving personal essay "Once More to the Lake" in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will determine an author’s point of view and examine how it contributes to the beauty of a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Confusing Pronouns:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" by using this interactive tutorial! In this tutorial, you'll examine some commonly confused pronouns. These pronouns have their own doppelgangers, which often trick people into believing that they have the same meaning, when in fact, their meanings can be very different. This tutorial will guide you out of doppelganger danger so that you will be able to distinguish the appropriate pronoun from its tricky double!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Make sure to complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click HERE for Part One.
  • Click HERE for Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words Commonly Confused:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Commonly Confused Words:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE for Part One.

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE for Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Complex Usage: Which Word Will Win?:

Examine five pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial focuses on language and resolving issues of complex usage. You will examine pairs of words that are often confused in order to learn the correct use of each word. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to accurately use these ten commonly confused words. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Word Doubles:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine fourteen homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Homophones:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine eleven homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words that Confuse:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine twelve homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part series. This tutorial is Part Two. In this tutorial, you will continue to examine excerpts from Emerson's essay that focus on the topic of traveling. You will examine word meanings and determine the connotations of specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of this portion of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part interactive tutorial series. This tutorial is Part One. In these tutorials, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about the emotions or associations that are connected to specific words. Finally, you will analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of these excerpts.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. This tutorial is Part Two. In this two-part series, you will learn to enhance your experience of Emerson's essay by analyzing his use of the word "genius." You will analyze Emerson's figurative meaning of "genius" and how he develops and refines the meaning of this key term over the course of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Four:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. In part 4 of this four-part, interactive tutorial series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. In Part One, you’ll learn to enhance your experience of a text by analyzing its use of a word’s figurative meaning. Specifically, you'll examine Emerson's figurative meaning of the key term "genius." In Part Two, you’ll learn how to track the development of a word’s figurative meaning over the course of a text. 

Make sure to complete both parts of the tutorial! Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Three:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part 3 of a 4-part series. By the end of this series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part Two:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part Two in a four-part series. By the end of this tutorial series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Themes in Pride and Prejudice - Part One:

Explore two key topics in the classic novel Pride and Prejudice and analyze characters’ actions as they relate to these topics. This tutorial is Part 1 of a four-part series. By the end of this series, you will use these topics and textual details to determine two themes of the novel. You will also analyze how these themes interact and build on one another.

Make sure to complete all four parts of the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reaching New Heights: Determining Multiple Themes in a Poem:

Learn how to determine themes and write thematic statements in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you'll examine three famous poems: “If-” by Rudyard Kipling, “A Psalm of Life” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley. Using these works of literature, you will practice determining multiple themes in a poem and crafting thematic statements.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Playing with Words: Changing Word Forms:

Learn how to turn words into other words in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn tips for transforming nouns into verbs, verbs into adjectives, adjectives into adverbs, and much more!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part Two):

Learn how to identify use of verbal and dramatic irony in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" in this interactive, two-part tutorial. Students will also examine how Poe's use of irony with first person point of view affects the story. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In Part One, students read and analyzed the first two excerpts from the story. In Part Two, students will read and analyze the last three excerpts from the story.

Click below to open Part One. 

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part 1 of 2)

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part 1 of 2):

Learn how to identify use of verbal and dramatic irony in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" in this interactive two-part tutorial. You'll also examine how Poe's use of irony with first person point of view affects the story. You'll read and analyze the first two excerpts from the story in part one, and the last three excerpts from the story in part two.

Click below to open part 2. 

Exploring Beneath the Surface: Irony in Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” (Part Two)

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes - Part 2:

Read an excerpt from "Freedom's Plow," a poem by Langston Hughes and identify topics and determine themes of that poem in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second part of a two-part series in which students will analyze works by Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes. In the final practice in this second tutorial, students will compare and contrast the two writers’ treatment of a similar topic and theme.

Part One should be completed before Part Two. Click to view Part One in this two-part series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Not? Part 2 :

Examine text excerpts from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and evaluate several film clips based on different adaptations of Shelley's novel in this two-part, interactive tutorial. By the end of this two-part tutorial, you should be able to analyze how the films’ various adaptations of the novel changes the audience’s perception of the creature that Shelley originally created. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series.

Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes (Part 1 of 2):

Learn about two writers of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes, in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series. In part one, you will read samples of Hurston's work and identify topics and determine themes. In part two, you will do the same for Langston Hughes, and then you will compare and contrast the two writers’ treatment of a similar topic and theme.

Click below to open part 2.

Hurston and Hughes: Analyzing Topics and Themes (Part 2 of 2)

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Not? Part 1 of 2:

Examine text excerpts from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and evaluate several film clips based on different adaptations of Shelley's novel in this two-part interactive tutorial. By the end of this two-part series, you should be able to analyze how the films’ various adaptations of the novel changes the audience’s perception of the creature Shelley originally created.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hallowed Words: Evaluating a Speaker's Effectiveness:

Examine the hallowed words of Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address." In this interactive tutorial you'll identify his point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to evaluate his effectiveness as a speaker.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Examine a famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln, his 2nd Inaugural Address. This speech, given a month before his assassination, is considered by many to be one of his most eloquent and moving speeches. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine Lincoln's purpose for his 2nd Inaugural Address, analyze his word choice, and identify his use of parallel structure. Finally, you should be able to put all of these things together to analyze how Lincoln's word choice and use of parallel structure contributed to the purpose for his speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action (Grades 11-12):

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn the definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Language Liaisons: A Relationship Between Words:

Explore word relationships by identifying and interpreting some figures of speech in context and analyzing the role or purpose they play in the text. In this interactive tutorial you will examine several kinds of figures of speech, including hyperbole and paradox. You'll also analyze nuances in the meanings of words with similar denotations or definitions. Several excerpts used in this tutorial come from works by William Shakespeare.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reader Reflections: Text Structures & Complex Ideas:

Learn to identify common text structures such as problem/solution, definition/example, cause and effect, and compare and contrast. In this interactive tutorial, you will read text excerpts from Walden by Henry David Thoreau and examine how he expressed complex ideas.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What the Dead Can Teach Us:

Learn to distinguish what is directly stated from what is really meant when working to analyze point of view in a text. In this interactive tutorial you'll examine humorous epitaphs from Edgar Lee Masters’ Spoon River Anthology to interpret an author’s true point of view based on the specific tools employed and the way they are presented in a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Purpose and Rhetoric: Analyzing Civil Disobedience:

Learn about the rhetorical techniques used by Henry David Thoreau in his influential essay, Civil Disobedience.  In this interactive tutorial you will determine one of Thoreau’s purposes for writing, identify his use of specific rhetorical techniques, and explain how these techniques are used to persuade the audience.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Nature of Words: Nuances, Relationships & Meanings:

Explore the work of poet William Blake as you examine word choice, word relationships, nuances in the meaning of words, and the use of figurative language with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drawing Evidence for Analysis and Reflection:

Learn to draw appropriate evidence from a text to support a written response to an analysis prompt and a reflection prompt. In this interactive tutorial you will be working with excerpts from two of George Orwell’s works: 1984 and “Shooting an Elephant.”

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Best Left Unsaid: Determining Matters of Brevity and Clarity:

We will break down the work of one of America's best wordsmiths, Ambrose Bierce, who was famous for his witty wordplay and use of satire, to practice a variety of skills using his essay "For Brevity and Clarity." By the end of this tutorial you should be able to cite textual evidence to prove what an author has stated directly, cite textual evidence to support inferences drawn from a text, distinguish what is indirectly stated in a text through the author's use of satire, and make inferences supported by textual evidence to determine ambiguities in a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Into the Wild: Close Encounters with Unfamiliar Words:

Learn several strategies for determining the meaning of unfamiliar words. This interactive tutorial will also help you identify common prefixes, and how they affect the meaning of words.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Story Elements Can Affect the Meaning of a Text:

Analyze how an author’s choices about character introductions, story setting, and the order of action can impact the meaning of a text using excerpts from the novel Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Clarence Darrow's Leopold and Loeb Speech:

Learn how to provide a complex analysis of two or more central ideas in a nonfiction text. Reading for this purpose will support your ability to evaluate and critically examine the central ideas an author wants to convey to the reader through the text. As part of this, you will be able to analyze how the author’s central ideas develop over the course of the text and describe how they interact and build on one another in support of the larger central ideas. This tutorial utilizes an excerpt from the closing arguments by Clarence Darrow at the trial of Leopold and Loeb.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Joy that Kills:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text. You should also be able to use strong and appropriate evidence from the text to support your analysis. Finally, you should be able to identify what the author leaves vague or unclear and then determine what additional information would be helpful to clarify the uncertainties in the text. In this tutorial you will apply these skills to a fictional short story titled “The Story of an Hour” written by Kate Chopin.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Do I Love Thee?: Examining Word Choice, Tone, and Meaning in Poetry:

Learn how the choice of words and phrases in a poem impacts the overall meaning and tone. In this interactive tutorial you'll examine Sonnet 43, “How Do I Love Thee?” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and engage in a critical analysis of the language, reflect on your own interpretations, and write about what you have learned.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Student Center Activity

Edcite: ELA Reading Grade 11:

Students can practice answering reading comprehension questions with engaging texts on the history of women's athletics. With an account, students can save their work and send it to their teacher when complete.

Type: Student Center Activity

Tutorial

Selling Yourself: Resume Generator:

In this tutorial from ReadWriteThink.org you will learn how to create a professional resume that showcases your talents and skills. This interactive site offers both chronological (if you have lots of work experience) or functional (if you have little work experience) templates to guide you through the development of your resume and offers helpful tips at each step of the process. When you are finished, you can print, save or email your resume.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
Reading Literature
Standards Notes:
These reading literature standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year's grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.

Reading Informational Text
Standards Notes:
These reading informational text standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades.

Writing
Standards Notes:
Each year in their writing, students should demonstrate increasing sophistication in all aspects of language use, from vocabulary and syntax to the development and organization of ideas, and they should address increasingly demanding content and sources. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade-specific writing benchmarks and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.

Speaking and Listening
Standards Notes:
The following speaking and listening standards offer a focus for instruction each year to help ensure that students gain adequate mastery of a range of communication skills and applications.

Language
Standards Notes:
The following language standards offer a focus for instruction each year to help ensure that students gain adequate mastery of a range of language skills and applications. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade-specific benchmarks and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.