Reading for College Success   (#1008350)

Version for Academic Year:
The course was/will be terminated at the end of School Year 2020 - 2021

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

This course is targeted for students who are not "college-ready" in reading. This course incorporates reading and analysis of informational selections to develop critical reading skills necessary for success in college courses. This course prepares students for successful completion of Florida college English language arts courses requiring extensive grade-level reading. The benchmarks reflect the Florida College Competencies necessary for entry-level college courses.

General Notes

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
demonstrating successful reading of argument, including recognizing bias and supporting details;
demonstrating successful reading of fact and opinion, including recognizing inferences and main ideas;
demonstrating knowledge of a variety of organizational patterns and their relationships in the comprehension of text, including recognizing purpose and tone of informational reading; and demonstrating successful understanding of vocabulary in context.

Instructional Practices: Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: http://www.cpalms.org/uploads/docs/standards/eld/la.pdf

For additional information on the development and implementation of the ELD standards, please contact the Bureau of Student Achievement through Language Acquisition at sala@fldoe.org.

Qualifications

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any field when certification reflects a bachelor or higher degree plus Reading Endorsement.

General Information

Course Number: 1008350
Abbreviated Title: READ COLL. SUCCESS
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Length: Semester (S)
Course Type: Elective Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 15 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Determining Point of View and Its Effect on a Text:

Read excerpts from E.B. White's moving personal essay "Once More to the Lake" in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will determine an author’s point of view and examine how it contributes to the beauty of a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Confusing Pronouns:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" by using this interactive tutorial! In this tutorial, you'll examine some commonly confused pronouns. These pronouns have their own doppelgangers, which often trick people into believing that they have the same meaning, when in fact, their meanings can be very different. This tutorial will guide you out of doppelganger danger so that you will be able to distinguish the appropriate pronoun from its tricky double!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Make sure to complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click HERE for Part One.
  • Click HERE for Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words Commonly Confused:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Commonly Confused Words:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE for Part One.

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE for Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Complex Usage: Which Word Will Win?:

Examine five pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial focuses on language and resolving issues of complex usage. You will examine pairs of words that are often confused in order to learn the correct use of each word. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to accurately use these ten commonly confused words. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Word Doubles:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine fourteen homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Homophones:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine eleven homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words that Confuse:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine twelve homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part series. This tutorial is Part Two. In this tutorial, you will continue to examine excerpts from Emerson's essay that focus on the topic of traveling. You will examine word meanings and determine the connotations of specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of this portion of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part interactive tutorial series. This tutorial is Part One. In these tutorials, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about the emotions or associations that are connected to specific words. Finally, you will analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of these excerpts.

Make sure to complete both parts! Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. This tutorial is Part Two. In this two-part series, you will learn to enhance your experience of Emerson's essay by analyzing his use of the word "genius." You will analyze Emerson's figurative meaning of "genius" and how he develops and refines the meaning of this key term over the course of the essay.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Figurative Meaning in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 1:

Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this interactive two-part tutorial. In Part One, you’ll learn to enhance your experience of a text by analyzing its use of a word’s figurative meaning. Specifically, you'll examine Emerson's figurative meaning of the key term "genius." In Part Two, you’ll learn how to track the development of a word’s figurative meaning over the course of a text. 

Make sure to complete both parts of the tutorial! Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Discovering the Treasure of Sentence Variety: Part 2:

Ahoy, mateys! In Part Two of this two-part tutorial series, you will learn about syntax and the ways in which writing with varied syntax can affect the meaning of a text. You will practice identifying simple, compound, and complex sentence structures and analyze the effect of these different types of structures on the meaning of a text. You will also practice writing using varied syntax. This two-part series examines different types of sentences from the novel Treasure Island.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two! Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Discovering the Treasure of Sentence Variety: Part 1:

Ahoy, mateys! Learn about syntax and the ways in which writing with varied syntax can affect the meaning of a text. In this two-part interactive tutorial you will learn about syntax: the arrangement of words in a sentence or word order. You will practice identifying simple, compound, and complex sentence structures and analyze the effect of these different types of structures on the meaning of a text. You will also practice writing using varied syntax. This two-part series examines different types of sentences from the novel Treasure Island

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE for Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Examine a famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln, his 2nd Inaugural Address. This speech, given a month before his assassination, is considered by many to be one of his most eloquent and moving speeches. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine Lincoln's purpose for his 2nd Inaugural Address, analyze his word choice, and identify his use of parallel structure. Finally, you should be able to put all of these things together to analyze how Lincoln's word choice and use of parallel structure contributed to the purpose for his speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action (Grades 11-12):

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn the definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Language Liaisons: A Relationship Between Words:

Explore word relationships by identifying and interpreting some figures of speech in context and analyzing the role or purpose they play in the text. In this interactive tutorial you will examine several kinds of figures of speech, including hyperbole and paradox. You'll also analyze nuances in the meanings of words with similar denotations or definitions. Several excerpts used in this tutorial come from works by William Shakespeare.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Reader Reflections: Text Structures & Complex Ideas:

Learn to identify common text structures such as problem/solution, definition/example, cause and effect, and compare and contrast. In this interactive tutorial, you will read text excerpts from Walden by Henry David Thoreau and examine how he expressed complex ideas.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Purpose and Rhetoric: Analyzing Civil Disobedience:

Learn about the rhetorical techniques used by Henry David Thoreau in his influential essay, Civil Disobedience.  In this interactive tutorial you will determine one of Thoreau’s purposes for writing, identify his use of specific rhetorical techniques, and explain how these techniques are used to persuade the audience.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Nature of Words: Nuances, Relationships & Meanings:

Explore the work of poet William Blake as you examine word choice, word relationships, nuances in the meaning of words, and the use of figurative language with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drawing Evidence for Analysis and Reflection:

Learn to draw appropriate evidence from a text to support a written response to an analysis prompt and a reflection prompt. In this interactive tutorial you will be working with excerpts from two of George Orwell’s works: 1984 and “Shooting an Elephant.”

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Best Left Unsaid: Determining Matters of Brevity and Clarity:

We will break down the work of one of America's best wordsmiths, Ambrose Bierce, who was famous for his witty wordplay and use of satire, to practice a variety of skills using his essay "For Brevity and Clarity." By the end of this tutorial you should be able to cite textual evidence to prove what an author has stated directly, cite textual evidence to support inferences drawn from a text, distinguish what is indirectly stated in a text through the author's use of satire, and make inferences supported by textual evidence to determine ambiguities in a text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Clarence Darrow's Leopold and Loeb Speech:

Learn how to provide a complex analysis of two or more central ideas in a nonfiction text. Reading for this purpose will support your ability to evaluate and critically examine the central ideas an author wants to convey to the reader through the text. As part of this, you will be able to analyze how the author’s central ideas develop over the course of the text and describe how they interact and build on one another in support of the larger central ideas. This tutorial utilizes an excerpt from the closing arguments by Clarence Darrow at the trial of Leopold and Loeb.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Student Center Activity

Edcite: ELA Reading Grade 11:

Students can practice answering reading comprehension questions with engaging texts on the history of women's athletics. With an account, students can save their work and send it to their teacher when complete.

Type: Student Center Activity

Tutorial

Proper Techniques for Research and Writing:

This tutorial provides you with step-by-step instructions for all aspects of writing a research paper and includes a comprehensive list of links to various style guides. Quizzes are also provided for self-assessment. Simply click start at the bottom of the home page to begin the presentation. If you want to only use portions of the tutorial, use the scroll down menu from the Jump To section located at the top of each presentation slide.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.