Personal, Career, and School Development Skills 1   (#0500500)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to experience success in school and improve attitudes and behaviors towards learning, self, school and community. Through enrollment in this class, students (and their families) are connected with public and private health, employment, counseling and social services. The private sector is involved in the collaboration in a variety of ways. These include tutoring of students, mentoring, serving as guest speakers or workshop leaders, donating materials/equipment/facilities, providing financial/in-kind support for motivation and recognition awards, offering work experience or job-shadowing opportunities, funding scholarships. Institutions of higher education also join the partnership by providing interns, tutors, mentors and scholarships.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • knowledge of self and others
  • development of positive attitudes
  • family relationships
  • peer pressure
  • individual responsibility
  • goal setting
  • time management
  • decision making
  • problem solving
  • leadership skills
  • life management skills
  • employability skills
  • career planning

Special Note:
This course may be used for dropout prevention.

General Information

Course Number: 0500500
Abbreviated Title: PERS,CAR,SCH DEV 1
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning — Part Two:

Practice identifying faulty reasoning in this two-part, interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums:

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Claims, Reasons, and Evidence: Examining Fair Arguments:

Learn about claims, reasons, and evidence using excerpts from a speech by author J.K. Rowling. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to identify an author’s claims and examine the fairness of an argument based on the soundness of its foundation, which should be built layer by layer with solid claims, reasons, and evidence.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Poem in 2 Voices: Jekyll and Hyde:

Learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence drawn from a literary text: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson.

You should complete Part One and Part Two of this series before beginning Part Three. Click HERE to launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and key details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 4 of 4):

Practice creating a concluding paragraph for an argumentative essay. This tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective conclusion: transitions, summary, synthesis, and a gift.

This interactive tutorial is part 4 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Untangling Food Webs:

Learn how living organisms can be organized into food webs and how energy is transferred through a food web from producers to consumers to decomposers. This interactive tutorial also includes interactive knowledge checks.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series.

Check out Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 3 of 4):

Practice creating a body paragraph for an argumentative essay on e-waste. This interactive tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective body paragraph: transitions; the topic sentence; reasons and evidence; and a brief wrap up.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 2 of 4):

Learn to create an organized, detailed introductory paragraph for an argumentative essay using the H.E.A.R.T. approach. H.E.A.R.T. is an acronym that standards for hook the reader, establish the context, address the argument, reveal the main points, and tie it together with transitions.

This interactive tutorial is part 2 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 1 of 4):

Learn how to create an outline to help you prepare to write an essay. You will read an informational text about technotrash, also called electronic waste or e-waste. Then, you will work on creating an outline that could help you write an argumentative essay about this topic. The outline will include a claim or thesis statement, main ideas, reasons, evidence, counterclaims, and rebuttals.  

This interactive tutorial is part 1 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comparing Mitosis and Meiosis:

Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis in this interactive tutorial. You'll also relate them to the processes of sexual and asexual reproduction and their consequences for genetic variation.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject:

Identify, compare, and contrast details about the Gettysburg Address that are emphasized in a text passage and in a video, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree:

Learn to identify basic trends in the evolutionary history of humans, including walking upright, brain size, jaw size, and tool use in "Climbing Around the Hominin Family Tree" online tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

LAFS.910.L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

The Florida Mathematical Practices should be incorporated as appropriate.