M/J Reading 2   (#1008040)

Version for Academic Year:
The course was/will be terminated at the end of School Year 2020 - 2021

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

The purpose of this course is to increase reading fluency and endurance through integrated experiences in the language arts. This course incorporates reading and analysis of literary and informational selections to develop critical and close reading skills. At the end of 7th grade students are expected to read and comprehend texts in the 6-8 grade complexity band proficiently and read texts at the high end of the band with support.

General Notes

Important Note: Reading and writing courses should not be used in place of English language arts courses; reading and writing courses are intended to be used to supplement further study in English language arts.

General Notes:
The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
  • demonstrating successful reading of argument;
  • demonstrating successful reading of fact and opinion;
  • demonstrating successful reading of high-quality literature;
  • demonstrating knowledge of a variety of organizational patterns and their relationships in the comprehension of text;
  • demonstrating successful understanding of academic vocabulary and vocabulary in context;
  • integrating reading and writing, including written responses to print and digital text;
  • using effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions;
  • collaborating extensively amongst peers.

Special Notes:

Instructional Practices: Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students’ content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.
  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).
The College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards and grade-specific standards are necessary complements-the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity-that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate at each grade level. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade specific benchmarks, retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades, and work steadily toward meeting the more general expectations described by the CCR anchor standards.

General Information

Course Number: 1008040
Course Path:
Abbreviated Title: M/J READ 2
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Elective Course
Course Level: 2
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 6,7,8

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

How Events Influence Individuals and Ideas – Part Three:

Examine how a significant event can influence individuals and ideas in this tutorial series about one of the most studied human injuries of all time. Read excerpts from John Fleischman’s book, Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science to learn about a young man’s remarkable survival after a near-fatal accident. 

This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. Make sure to complete the other parts first.

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Influence Individuals and Ideas – Part Two:

Examine how a significant event can influence individuals and ideas in this tutorial series about one of the most studied human injuries of all time. Read excerpts from John Fleischman’s book Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science to learn about a young man’s remarkable survival after a near-fatal accident. 

This tutorial is Part Two in a three-part series. Make sure to complete Part One first. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Then, make sure to complete Part Three! Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Events Influence Individuals and Ideas – Part One:

Examine how a significant event can influence individuals and ideas in this interactive tutorial series about one of the most studied human injuries of all time. Read excerpts from John Fleischman’s book Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science to learn about a young man’s remarkable survival after a near-fatal accident. Phineas Gage, at the age of twenty-six, survived a traumatic brain injury that would not only challenge the scientific understandings of his time but would also provide interesting revelations about the human brain to this day.

In Part One, you’ll begin to identify what makes a particular event significant, such as how a life-altering injury—like what happened to Phineas Gage—can influence an individual. 

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 12 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Setting Develops Character in Little Women:

Examine how the story elements of plot, setting, and character interact in an excerpt from the novel Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. In this interactive tutorial, you'll focus especially on how setting can shape the characters and plot of a story.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery:

Learn 12 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial!  You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Addicted To Lotteries: An Analysis Of Text Structures:

Learn about text structures found in informational texts by reading an article about lotteries in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action:

Learn 12 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial!  You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Learn 12 new academic vocabulary terms using synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in this interactive tutorial.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Spread Your Wings: Structure & Meaning in Poetry:

Explore the structure and meaning of poetry and learn how poems are organized to express and develop themes. Along the way, you will also learn some key terms like diction, imagery, and mood. This interactive tutorial uses two famous poems as examples, one by William Blake and one by Emily Dickinson. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Game On: Finding the Central Idea:

Select a character and learn to identify and explain the central idea within a text.  In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze an article about video games to find the central idea of each paragraph and the entire article.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Food For Thought: Analyzing Authors' Approaches:

Discover how different authors approach the same topic in different ways by examining several passages that describe how insects have become a common food in certain parts of the world. With this interactive tutorial, you will learn how to analyze an author's approach based on the central idea of the text and the evidence used as support.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Sacagawea: Evidence of Fearlessness:

Learn to identify and understand the evidence presented within a text about Sacagawea. In this interactive tutorial, you will analyze information within the text, identify and cite textual evidence, and make inferences based on the information provided in the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Mastering Language: Beware of the Wordiness Monster :

Improve your writing by identifying language that is too wordy or repetitive. With this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to replace wordy sentences with clear, concise language.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Paul Revere's Ride - What Really Happened?:

Read the famous poem "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" and see how its author embellishes historical fact to create historical fiction in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Different Perspectives: Analyzing Points of View:

Read an original short story about a car crash to analyze the points of view of the different characters in the story. This interactive tutorial will help you decide if they objective or subjective.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Frederick Douglass: The Art of Interaction:

Analyze the interactions between individuals, ideas, and events in an excerpt from the famous autobiography, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Parts: Follow the Signs:

Find the meanings of unfamiliar words by analyzing their word parts, like roots and prefixes.  In this interactive tutorial, you'll see how these "signs" will guide you in your reading.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Finding Buried Treasure: Uncovering the Theme:

Read several short stories about pirates and treasure and learn how to summarize a story, identify its theme, and tell the difference between the two with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing POEtry:

Learn how to identify sound devices such as repetition, alliteration, and assonance in the poems of Edgar Allan Poe. As you complete this interactive tutorial, you'll read portions of "The Raven," "The Bells," and "Annabel Lee."  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"The Last Leaf" -- Making Inferences:

Read the short story "The Last Leaf" by O. Henry to learn how to make inferences based on explicit and implicit information and your own reasoning as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Go Figure: Learning Figurative Language:

Learn how figures of speech like simile, metaphor, and personification are used in the speeches of famous individuals. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine text from speeches by John F. Kennedy, Barack Obama, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Arguing Mars :

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to identify a speaker’s argument or claim. You will also learn how to evaluate the evidence and reasoning presented in a speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

The Power of Simple Words:

In this animated video from TEDed, you will identify simple elements of style that can improve your writing. You will learn that short, simple language can sometimes be the best option.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 4 Recognizing Apostrophes :

This fun, interactive 20-question activity will give you practice in correct apostrophe use. In this activity you will practice using apostrophes to simplify long phrases to eliminate wordiness or redundancy. Each question gives you immediate feedback on whether your answer was correct or not.

Type: Tutorial

Grammar Bytes! Exercise 5 Recognizing Apostrophes:

This fun, interactive 20-question activity will give you practice in correct apostrophe use. In this activity you will practice using apostrophes to simplify long phrases to eliminate wordiness or redundancy. Each question gives you immediate feedback on whether your answer was correct or not.

Type: Tutorial

The Case Against Good and Bad:

In this animated video from TEDed, you will learn why words like "bad" and "good" are not descriptive and have no place in your writing. You will also be able to choose many other more appropriate words to improve your writing once you finish the video.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.
Reading Literature

Standard Notes: These reading literature standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year's grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.

Reading Informational Text

Standard Notes: These reading informational text standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades.

Reading Informational Text

Standard Notes: These reading informational text standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades.

Speaking and Listening

Standard Notes: The following speaking and listening standards offer a focus for instruction each year to help ensure that students gain adequate mastery of a range of communication skills and applications.

Language

Standard Notes: The following language standards offer a focus for instruction each year to help ensure that students gain adequate mastery of a range of language skills and applications. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each succeeding year's grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.