Reading Honors   (#1008320)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

Version Description

The course emphasizes advanced reading comprehension and vocabulary study using a variety of grade appropriate texts encompassing a range of complexity. Students enrolled in the course will engage in research, write in response to reading, and cite evidence to answer text dependent questions both orally and in writing. The course provides extensive opportunities for students to collaborate with their peers.

General Notes

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

Important Note: Reading and writing courses should not be used in place of English language arts courses; reading and writing courses are intended to be used to supplement further study in English language arts.

General Notes:
The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • demonstrating successful reading of argument, including recognizing bias and supporting details;
  • demonstrating successful reading of fact and opinion, including recognizing inferences and main ideas;
  • demonstrating successful reading of high-quality literature, including the use of text craft and literary effects to develop theme and tone;
  • demonstrating knowledge of a variety of organizational patterns and their relationships in the comprehension of text, including recognizing purpose and tone of informational reading;
  • demonstrating successful understanding of academic vocabulary and vocabulary in context;
  • integrating reading and writing, including extensive written responses to print and digital text;
  • using effective listening, speaking, and viewing strategies with emphasis on the use of evidence to support or refute a claim in multimedia presentations, class discussions, and extended text discussions;
  • collaborating extensively amongst peers.

Special Notes:

Instructional Practices:
Teaching from well-written, grade-level instructional materials enhances students' content area knowledge and also strengthens their ability to comprehend longer, complex reading passages on any topic for any purpose. Using the following instructional practices also helps student learning.

  1. Reading assignments from longer text passages, as well as shorter ones when text is extremely complex.
  2. Making close reading and rereading of texts central to lessons.
  3. Asking high-level, text-specific questions and requiring high-level, complex tasks and assignments.
  4. Requiring students to support answers with evidence from the text.
  5. Providing extensive text-based research and writing opportunities (claims and evidence).

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL's need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: http://www.cpalms.org/uploads/docs/standards/eld/la.pdf

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection is provided by the Florida Association of School Administrators: http://www.fasa.net/4DCGI/cms/review.html?Action=CMS_Document&DocID=139. Please be aware that these resources have not been reviewed by CPALMS and there may be a charge for the use of some of them in this collection.

Qualifications

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any field when certification reflects a bachelor or higher degree plus Reading Endorsement.

General Information

Course Number: 1008320
Abbreviated Title: READ HON
Number of Credits: Half credit (.5)
Course Length: Semester (S)
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
Course Type: Elective Course
Course Level: 3
Course Status: Terminated
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part Three: Comparing Themes Across Two Poems:

Compare and contrast how William Wordsworth established multiple themes within two of his poems: "Lines Written in Early Spring" and "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud."

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part Two: Determining Multiple Themes of a Poem:

Continue to analyze William Wordsworth's poem "Lines Written in Early Spring" to determine multiple themes and craft thematic statements. 

This interactive tutorial is part 2 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Poems of Spring -- Part One: Identifying Multiple Topics in a Poem:

Study William Wordsworth's poem "Lines Written in Early Spring" to identify multiple topics and, in the next tutorial, to determine themes and craft thematic statements. 

This interactive tutorial is part 1 of 3. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Time for Leisure: Part Two:

Study "Leisure," a poem by Amy Lowell, to determine a theme of the poem and craft a thematic statement. At the end of this interactive tutorial, you'll use what you've learned throughout this two-part series to compare and contrast a theme in "Leisure" by Amy Lowell and a theme in "Leisure" by W. H. Davies and how these themes are developed.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Time for Leisure: Part One:

Learn to determine a theme of a poem, craft a thematic statement, and write a summary of the poem "Leisure" by W. H. Davies.  

This interactive tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In Part Two, you'll study "Leisure" by Amy Lowell to determine a theme of the poem and craft a thematic statement. By the end of this series, you will compare and contrast a theme in each poem and how these themes are developed. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Character Reborn in The Count of Monte Cristo -- Part Three:

As you continue to study a chapter from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, you'll continue to examine how the main character, Edmond Dantès, is reborn from a prisoner into a newly freed man. In Part Three of this three-part series, you should be able to explain how Dantès’ overall transformation by the end of the chapter takes the plot in a new direction.

You should complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Character Reborn in The Count of Monte Cristo -- Part Two:

As you continue to study a chapter from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, you'll continue to examine how the main character, Edmond Dantès, is reborn from a prisoner into a newly freed man. In Part Two of this three-part series, you'll continue to identify Dantès' key character traits or strengths and examine how Dantès begins to transform as he works to secure his freedom.

Make sure to complete all three parts!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Character Reborn in The Count of Monte Cristo -- Part One:

Study a chapter from one of the most popular adventure stories of all time: The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In Part One of this three-part series, you'll identify key character traits or strengths of Edmond Dantès and determine how he draws on these strengths as he struggles to survive and avoid recapture.

Make sure to complete all three parts!

  • Click HERE to launch Part Two. 
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Letter to My Daughter: How Ideas Are Developed:

Read excerpts from Maya Angelou's book of essays, Letter to My Daughter. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you'll identify an important idea in each excerpt and examine how the author develops the important idea throughout the section of text. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Theme Is Developed in Short Poetry: Part Three:

Explore the poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay in this tutorial series. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In Part Three, you’ll study her poem "Recuerdo." You'll identify the topic of the poem, determine a theme of the poem, and explain how the theme is developed through specific words and phrases.

You're encouraged to complete the previous tutorials in this series before beginning Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part One. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Theme Is Developed in Short Poetry: Part Two:

Explore the poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay in this tutorial series. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In Part Two, you’ll study her short poem "Second Fig." You'll identify the topic of the poem, determine a theme of the poem, and explain how the theme is developed through specific words and phrases.

Make sure to complete all three parts!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How a Theme Is Developed in Short Poetry: Part One:

Explore three short poems by the famous American poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and practice determining a theme for each poem in this three-part, interactive tutorial series. In Part One, you’ll identify the topic of the short poem “First Fig.” Then, you’ll select words and phrases from the poem that address the topic of the poem. Finally, you’ll determine a theme in the short poem. By the end of this series, you should be able to explain how a theme is developed and supported by specific words and phrases throughout a short poem. 

Make sure to complete all three tutorials in this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Unleashed:

Learn 12 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial! You'll practice the words' synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning — Part Two:

Practice identifying faulty reasoning in this two-part, interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums:

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part Two:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part, interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth. 

This tutorial is the second in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part One:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part, interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth.  

This tutorial is the first in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Light and Darkness in Two Artistic Mediums:

Study the poem “We Grow Accustomed to the Dark” by Emily Dickinson and view the painting The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh to explain how each medium represents the subjects of light and darkness similarly and differently, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part Two:

Explore and explain multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol, which is set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. In this interactive tutorial, you'll also observe the culture of this society from multiple angles. 

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech regarding women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help advance an author's point of view.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part One:

Learn multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol. In this two-part interactive tutorial, you’ll study excerpts from this story set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. By the end of this tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the multiple points of view within the story allows readers to observe the culture of this society from multiple angles.

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Claims, Reasons, and Evidence: Examining Fair Arguments:

Learn about claims, reasons, and evidence using excerpts from a speech by author J.K. Rowling. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to identify an author’s claims and examine the fairness of an argument based on the soundness of its foundation, which should be built layer by layer with solid claims, reasons, and evidence.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Metaphors and Imagery in E.B. White's "Once More to the Lake":

Explore the effect of literary devices in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. Specifically, you will explore the effect of metaphors and imagery on a text. First, you’ll determine when an author uses these devices in a text, and then you’ll examine how they contribute to the meaning and beauty of the text.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Confusing Pronouns:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" by using this interactive tutorial! In this tutorial, you'll examine some commonly confused pronouns. These pronouns have their own doppelgangers, which often trick people into believing that they have the same meaning, when in fact, their meanings can be very different. This tutorial will guide you out of doppelganger danger so that you will be able to distinguish the appropriate pronoun from its tricky double!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words Commonly Confused:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Commonly Confused Words:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine six pairs of commonly confused words. Learning how to correctly use these commonly confused words will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Connotative Meaning in Annie Dillard's "Total Eclipse":

Examine a first person perspective on what it's like to witness a total solar eclipse. In this tutorial, you will study excerpts from “Total Eclipse,” an essay written by Annie Dillard. Your overarching goal will be to analyze Dillard’s word choices throughout a portion of her essay that focuses on the fear of the unknown. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Complex Usage: Which Word Will Win?:

Examine five pairs of commonly confused words in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial focuses on language and resolving issues of complex usage. You will examine pairs of words that are often confused in order to learn the correct use of each word. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to accurately use these ten commonly confused words. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Word Doubles:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine fourteen homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Tricky Homophones:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine eleven homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Doppelganger Danger: Words that Confuse:

Avoid "doppelganger danger" as you examine twelve homophones, which are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Learning how to use these homophones correctly in this interactive tutorial will help you avoid some of the most common spelling mistakes.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part Two):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part, interactive tutorial. In Part 2, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete all three parts!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part Three):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part, interactive tutorial. In Part 3, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete the first two parts.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Bermuda Triangle: Full of Mysterious Words! (Part One):

Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in an informational text about the Bermuda Triangle in this three-part, interactive tutorial. In Part 1, you'll practice determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary using context clues and dictionary skills.

Click below to complete all three parts!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.

Please complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.  

Please complete Part Two after completing this tutorial. Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem. This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven."

Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part One:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great We: Analyzing Word Choice and Tone, Part 2:

Practice using textual details and connotative meanings to help you determine a narrator's tone in this two-part, interactive tutorial. This tutorial series features excerpts from Ayn Rand's dystopian novella, Anthem.

Make sure to complete Part One before you begin Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Poem in 2 Voices: Jekyll and Hyde:

Learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence drawn from a literary text: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson.

You should complete Part One and Part Two of this series before beginning Part Three. Click HERE to launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part Two:

Get ready to travel back in time to London, England during the Victorian era in this interactive tutorial that uses text excerpts from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. You should complete Part One before beginning this tutorial. In Part Two, you will read excerpts from the last half of the story and practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text. In the third tutorial in this series, you’ll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. 

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Playing with Words: Changing Word Forms:

Learn how to turn words into other words in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn tips for transforming nouns into verbs, verbs into adjectives, adjectives into adverbs, and much more!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Mastery :

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Voices of Jekyll and Hyde, Part One:

Practice citing evidence to support analysis of a literary text as you read excerpts from one of the most famous works of horror fiction of all time, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. 

This tutorial is Part One of a three-part tutorial. In Part Two, you'll continue your analysis of the text. In Part Three, you'll learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence from this story. Make sure to complete all three parts! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two. Click HERE to launch Part Three. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and key details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part Two:

Learn how to analyze how the text structure, order of events, and relationships between events build throughout a text to create meaning in this interactive tutorial that features a chapter from Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. This tutorial is part two of a two-part series.

Part One should be completed before Part Two. Click to view Part One

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and key details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4):

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part One:

Learn how to analyze how the text structure, order of events, and relationships between events build throughout a text to create meaning in this interactive tutorial that features a chapter from Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

This tutorial is part 1 of a 2-part series. Click HERE to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great We: Analyzing Word Choice and Tone, Part One:

Practice using textual details and connotative meanings to help you determine a narrator's tone in this two-part, interactive tutorial. This tutorial series features excerpts from Ayn Rand's dystopian novella, Anthem. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 4 of 4):

Practice creating a concluding paragraph for an argumentative essay. This tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective conclusion: transitions, summary, synthesis, and a gift.

This interactive tutorial is part 4 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series.

Check out Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 3 of 4):

Practice creating a body paragraph for an argumentative essay on e-waste. This interactive tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective body paragraph: transitions; the topic sentence; reasons and evidence; and a brief wrap up.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 2 of 4):

Learn to create an organized, detailed introductory paragraph for an argumentative essay using the H.E.A.R.T. approach. H.E.A.R.T. is an acronym that standards for hook the reader, establish the context, address the argument, reveal the main points, and tie it together with transitions.

This interactive tutorial is part 2 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 1 of 4):

Learn how to create an outline to help you prepare to write an essay. You will read an informational text about technotrash, also called electronic waste or e-waste. Then, you will work on creating an outline that could help you write an argumentative essay about this topic. The outline will include a claim or thesis statement, main ideas, reasons, evidence, counterclaims, and rebuttals.  

This interactive tutorial is part 1 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary in Action:

Acquire new vocabulary through this interactive tutorial. You'll learn definitions for 15 new words, as well as their parts of speech, their synonyms and antonyms, and you'll practice using them in context. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Vocabulary Power:

Review strategies for acquiring new vocabulary and then learn fifteen new words in this interactive tutorial. You'll also practice using the words in a variety of ways to help you add them to your vocabulary.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Exploring and Gathering Vocabulary:

Learn several ways to gather knowledge about an unknown word in order to determine its meaning, ways that include context clues, word parts, and dictionary skills. Determining the meaning of unknown words will help you increase your understanding of texts that you read, and it will also help you use words more accurately in your own writing. The text passages used in this interactive tutorial provide vivid descriptions of Florida.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Rhetoric in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird:

Analyze the use of rhetoric in a courtroom speech from Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. In this interactive tutorial, we'll break down each of its parts to understand why it was so powerful and how the content of the text contributed to its purpose and persuasiveness.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Words and Phrases with the Gettysburg Address:

Review vocabulary strategies to use when you are unsure about the meaning of words in a text. We will also review the literary term tone. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to apply your skills to determine the meaning of unknown words in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. You should also be able to analyze the words and phrases that Lincoln uses in order to determine his tone in the Gettysburg Address.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how a speaker uses rhetoric to advance his purpose in this interactive tutorial. To achieve the final objective, you will learn how to determine a speaker’s purpose, identify different uses of rhetoric, and explain the impact of rhetoric on the speaker’s purpose. This tutorial will use excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress" from 1917. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea:

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that we may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Scout Learns Life Lessons: Analyzing How a Character Develops Themes:

Learn to define and identify several literary elements, including theme, topic, and plot summary, and explain the differences between them as you focus on Scout—one of the main characters from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. In this interactive tutorial you'll also analyze how her words, thoughts, and actions develop important themes of the novel and use your skills to develop a theme statement.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify a concept addressed in texts from two different time periods in U.S. history and distinguish the similarities and differences between the ways the texts treat this concept. The texts featured in this tutorial are the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Figure it Out! :

Explore types of figurative language, specifically personification and hyperbole, in the prologue of the novel The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze the effect those figurative language elements have on the beginning of the story.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Figurative Language and Its Role in Poetry:

Identify examples of figurative language, specifically simile, metaphor, and personification, within two poems: William Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and William Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” With this interactive tutorial, you'll explore how each poet’s use of figurative language and word relationships contribute to a poem’s meaning.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding and Using Context Clues with the Help of Patrick Henry:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text.

In this tutorial, you will be working with excerpts from Patrick Henry’s “Speech to the Virginia Convention.”  You should also be able to use dictionary entries to discover additional word meanings and confirm your predictions of what words mean. Finally, you should be able to examine a passage and use all of these strategies to determine the meanings of the words so that you can understand what Patrick Henry was trying to say to his fellow revolutionaries and statesmen.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Literary Magic of Allusions and Archetypes:

Learn to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text, including common allusions and archetypes, with this interactive tutorial. You'll examine examples from the novel A Separate Peace and the story of Cain and Abel from the Bible.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing an Author’s Claims :

Discover how to analyze and author's claim. Have you ever wanted to make a statement or have your voice heard? If so, you are not alone. Speakers and writers have been working to have their voices heard by making claims since communication first began. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to define what a claim is, determine an author’s claim, distinguish details in a text that develop an author’s claim, and discriminate details and techniques an author uses to refine a claim. More specifically, you will use these skills in this tutorial to closely examine two texts: one by Sojourner Truth and one by Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Look at the Past: Women at Work-- Analyzing a Subject in Different Mediums:

Learn to analyze how a subject can be represented in a variety of different mediums, both visual, or artistic, and written, or literary. You will learn about some of the common composition features used in visual mediums, such as photographs or paintings. Then, you will learn how to analyze artistic and literary mediums by collecting evidence, making inferences, and using this information to determine the overall message. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to distinguish compositional and literary features in three different artistic mediums including a poster, photograph, and excerpt from a novel. The mediums featured in this tutorial were created during the 1930s and 40s. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject:

Identify, compare, and contrast details about the Gettysburg Address that are emphasized in a text passage and in a video, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing A Complex Character - Fahrenheit 451:

Analyze a complex character’s development in text excerpts from the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and explain how interactions with other characters influenced this development, in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words:

Learn how to understand the rhetorical techniques that speakers use to advance their point of view. First, we will explore and answer the questions: What is rhetoric? What is the rhetorical triangle? What are modes? Then, you will learn how to identify and analyze how speakers use rhetorical techniques. Finally, you will identify the point of view in a speech and then explain how it is advanced through the use of rhetoric. You will then practice these skills on several speech excerpts. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Effects of Text Structures in Ylla from the Martian Chronicles:

Examine the organizational patterns authors use in fictional works. These patterns are also known as text structures. You will also analyze excerpts from the story "Ylla", from The Martian Chronicles, to see how author Ray Bradbury uses these structures and other literary techniques to create certain effects, such as mystery, tension, and suspense.

First you will review common text structures. Next, you will learn how to recognize how an author's use of text structures creates certain effects in writing. Then, you will determine the choices author Ray Bradbury made in structuring portions of the text "Ylla" from The Martian Chronicles. Finally, you will analyze how these structural choices create dramatic effects in "Ylla" such as mystery, tension, or suspense.

Learn how to identify and examine common text structures and analyze how Bradbury successfully uses these structures in several excerpts from "Ylla" from The Martian Chronicles.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Building Mystery, Tension and Suspense:

Learn how to identify some of the key ways through which authors create mystery, suspense, and tension within a story.  Specifically, you’ll be able to define and explain how authors use the devices of exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to create mystery, suspense, and tension within a story.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Greek Monsters on Parade:

Learn to define the term theme and use some key literary elements such as characters, character traits, and plot to help you determine a theme. This interactive tutorial will also help you distinguish the difference between themes and topics in a work of literature and how to use topics in a story to help you determine themes. Then you'll work to determine a theme in a an excerpt from Book 12 of The Odyssey and then write a theme statement based on the evidence in the text.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Inferences and Explicit and Implicit Evidence:

Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in an excerpt from the novel Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. In this interactive tutorial, you will use inferences to determine key aspects of the setting and characterization used in the excerpt.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

President Ronald Reagan Speaks to the "Enemy":

Analyze a famous speech by the late-President Ronald Reagan to find what the text says directly and indirectly. This interactive tutorial will challenge you to prove your points with evidence by referring to what is explicitly or directly stated in a text, as well as show what textual evidence you used to infer what the author simply hinted at.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

An Antihero of One's Own :

In this very engaging animated video from TEDed, you will learn about antiheroes. Antiheroes can be hard to distinguish from typical heroes. However, through this video you will be able to identify what an antihero is and understand how these complex characters with often unclear motivations play such important roles in great literature.

Type: Tutorial

What Makes a Hero?:

A great way to understand literature from epic poetry to literary series is to understand what makes a hero. In this very engaging animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the hero cycle, a common literary trope that can been found in many works like Harry Potter, The Hunger Games and even The Odyssey!

Type: Tutorial

The Art of the Metaphor:

In this animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the power of metaphors in your reading and in your writing. The video explores questions like: "How do metaphors help us better understand the world?", as well as "What makes a good metaphor?"

Type: Tutorial

What is Verbal Irony?:

In this animated video from TEDed, you will learn how to detect subtle nuances in tone and situation. Once you master tone and situation, then you will be able to identify verbal irony and how it affects one's interpretation of a piece of literature.

Type: Tutorial

Shakespearean Dating Tips:

In this animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the modern day relevance of Shakespeare's plays. You will also be able to identify how the English language has changed over time.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.