Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Inquiry Skills   (#1700360)

Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

Special Note. Pre-IB courses have been created by individual schools or school districts since before the MYP started. These courses mapped backwards the Diploma Programme (DP) to prepare students as early as age 14. The IB was never involved in creating or approving these courses. The IB acknowledges that it is important for students to receive preparation for taking part in the DP, and that preparation is the MYP. The IB designed the MYP to address the whole child, which, as a result, has a very different philosophical approach that aims at educating all students aged 11-16. Pre-IB courses usually deal with content, with less emphasis upon the needs of the whole child or the affective domain than the MYP. A school can have a course that it calls “pre-IB” as long as it makes it clear that the course and any supporting material have been developed independently of the IB. For this reason, the school must name the course along the lines of, for example, the “Any School pre-IB course”.

The IB does not recognize pre-IB courses or courses labeled IB by different school districts which are not an official part of the IBDP or IBCC curriculum. Typically, students enrolled in grade 9 or 10 are not in the IBDP or IBCC programmes.
https://ibanswers.ibo.org/app/answers/detail/a_id/5414/kw/pre-ib. Florida’s Pre-IB courses should only be used in schools where MYP is not offered in order to prepare students to enter the IBDP. Teachers of Florida’s Pre-IB courses should have undergone IB training in order to ensure seamless articulation for students within the subject area.

Honors and Advanced Level Course Note: Advanced courses require a greater demand on students through increased academic rigor.  Academic rigor is obtained through the application, analysis, evaluation, and creation of complex ideas that are often abstract and multi-faceted.  Students are challenged to think and collaborate critically on the content they are learning. Honors level rigor will be achieved by increasing text complexity through text selection, focus on high-level qualitative measures, and complexity of task. Instruction will be structured to give students a deeper understanding of conceptual themes and organization within and across disciplines. Academic rigor is more than simply assigning to students a greater quantity of work.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:
Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: http://www.cpalms.org/uploads/docs/standards/eld/SI.pdf

Qualifications

As well as any certification requirements listed on the course description, the following qualifications may also be acceptable for the course:

Any academic coverage (any coverage classified as an academic coverage in Rules 6A-4.0101 through 6A-4.0343, Florida Administrative Code).

General Information

Course Number: 1700360
Abbreviated Title: FL PRE-IB INQ SKILLS
Number of Credits: One (1) credit
Course Length: Year (Y)
Course Attributes:
  • Honors
Course Type: Elective Course
Course Level: 3
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10

Educator Certifications

One of these educator certification options is required to teach this course.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

It's Not Magic: Distinguishing Between Passive and Active Voice:

Learn to distinguish between passive and active voice and how to revise sentences by changing them from passive to active voice in this magic-themed tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Turtles and Towns:

Explore the impacts on sea turtles, humans, and the economy when we live, work, and play at the beach with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning — Part Two:

Practice identifying faulty reasoning in this two-part, interactive, English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete Part One before Part Two! Click HERE to launch Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Year-Round School Debate: Identifying Faulty Reasoning – Part One:

Learn to identify faulty reasoning in this two-part interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll learn what some experts say about year-round schools, what research has been conducted about their effectiveness, and how arguments can be made for and against year-round education. Then, you'll read a speech in favor of year-round schools and identify faulty reasoning within the argument, specifically the use of hasty generalizations. 

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click HERE to open Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums:

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech regarding women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help advance an author's point of view.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Claims, Reasons, and Evidence: Examining Fair Arguments:

Learn about claims, reasons, and evidence using excerpts from a speech by author J.K. Rowling. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to identify an author’s claims and examine the fairness of an argument based on the soundness of its foundation, which should be built layer by layer with solid claims, reasons, and evidence.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part Two of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.

Please complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

Want to learn about Amelia Earhart, one of the most famous female aviators of all time? If so, then this interactive tutorial is for YOU! This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In this series, you will study a speech by Amelia Earhart. You will practice identifying the purpose of her speech and practice identifying her use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, logos, pathos, Kairos). You will also evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's rhetorical choices based on the purpose of her speech.  

Please complete Part Two after completing this tutorial. Click HERE to view Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

A Poem in 2 Voices: Jekyll and Hyde:

Learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a Poem in 2 Voices using evidence drawn from a literary text: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson.

You should complete Part One and Part Two of this series before beginning Part Three. Click HERE to launch Part One. Click HERE to launch Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 4 of 4):

Practice writing different aspects of an expository essay about scientists using drones to research glaciers in Peru. This interactive tutorial is part four of a four-part series. In this final tutorial, you will learn about the elements of a body paragraph. You will also create a body paragraph with supporting evidence. Finally, you will learn about the elements of a conclusion and practice creating a “gift.” 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Expository Writing: Eyes in the Sky (Part 3 of 4):

Learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the third part of a four-part series. In previous tutorials in this series, students analyzed an informational text and video about scientists using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. Students also determined the central idea and key details of the text and wrote an effective summary. In part three, you'll learn how to write an introduction for an expository essay about the scientists' research. 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and key details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4):

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part 1 of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Avoiding Plagiarism: It's Not Magic:

Learn ways to help you avoid plagiarism in this interactive tutorial. You will also learn how to follow a standard format for citation and how to format your research paper using MLA style. Along the way, you will also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part two of a two-part series on research writing.

Part One should be completed before Part Two. Click to view Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 4 of 4):

Practice creating a concluding paragraph for an argumentative essay. This tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective conclusion: transitions, summary, synthesis, and a gift.

This interactive tutorial is part 4 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series.

Check out Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 3 of 4):

Practice creating a body paragraph for an argumentative essay on e-waste. This interactive tutorial will focus on four elements of an effective body paragraph: transitions; the topic sentence; reasons and evidence; and a brief wrap up.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 2 of 4):

Learn to create an organized, detailed introductory paragraph for an argumentative essay using the H.E.A.R.T. approach. H.E.A.R.T. is an acronym that standards for hook the reader, establish the context, address the argument, reveal the main points, and tie it together with transitions.

This interactive tutorial is part 2 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Careful Choices: Integrating Information and Selecting for Style:

Learn how language functions in different contexts, and you will learn how to make effective choices for meaning or style in your own writing. You will learn how to integrate information into an original text selectively in order to maintain the flow of ideas, avoid plagiarism, and follow a standard format for citations while integrating source texts. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to read a source text, select relevant information from that text, and selectively integrate that information into your own writing, while correctly citing your sources.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste (Part 1 of 4):

Learn how to create an outline to help you prepare to write an essay. You will read an informational text about technotrash, also called electronic waste or e-waste. Then, you will work on creating an outline that could help you write an argumentative essay about this topic. The outline will include a claim or thesis statement, main ideas, reasons, evidence, counterclaims, and rebuttals.  

This interactive tutorial is part 1 in a 4-part series about writing an essay. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Part 1 - Planning Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 2 - Introductions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 3 - Body Paragraphs in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Part 4 - Conclusions in Argument Writing: E-Waste

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Eliminating Exotics: Identifying and Assessing Research for Quality and Usefulness:

Explore the topic of invasive exotics in Florida while you learn to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information in research sources, identify authoritative sources from a group of varied resources, and dissect a research question in order to identify keywords for a search of resources. With this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn to use advanced search features to find appropriate sources to address a research question and assess the usefulness of sources when addressing a specific research question. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how a speaker uses rhetoric to advance his purpose in this interactive tutorial. To achieve the final objective, you will learn how to determine a speaker’s purpose, identify different uses of rhetoric, and explain the impact of rhetoric on the speaker’s purpose. This tutorial will use excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress" from 1917. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea:

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor, Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that we may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to identify a concept addressed in texts from two different time periods in U.S. history and distinguish the similarities and differences between the ways the texts treat this concept. The texts featured in this tutorial are the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject:

Identify, compare, and contrast details about the Gettysburg Address that are emphasized in a text passage and in a video, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words:

Learn how to understand the rhetorical techniques that speakers use to advance their point of view. First, we will explore and answer the questions: What is rhetoric? What is the rhetorical triangle? What are modes? Then, you will learn how to identify and analyze how speakers use rhetorical techniques. Finally, you will identify the point of view in a speech and then explain how it is advanced through the use of rhetoric. You will then practice these skills on several speech excerpts. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

President Ronald Reagan Speaks to the "Enemy":

Analyze a famous speech by the late-President Ronald Reagan to find what the text says directly and indirectly. This interactive tutorial will challenge you to prove your points with evidence by referring to what is explicitly or directly stated in a text, as well as show what textual evidence you used to infer what the author simply hinted at.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Chemistry With a Conscience:

Explore green chemistry and what it means to be benign by design in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Educational Game

Stop Disasters Before They Happen:

Students attempt to save towns from damage prior to the arrival of several different natural disasters. Students will learn the importance of early prevention and actions to protect others, themselves and their property when faced with a natural disaster. Certain disasters are more appropriate for particular grade levels. Each scenario takes between 20 and 45 minutes to play, depending on the disaster for which your students are trying to prepare. There are five scenarios available, hurricane, tsunami, flood, earthquake, and wildfire. Each scenario can be played on easy, medium or hard difficulty levels. As with life, there are no "perfect solutions" to each scenario and no "perfect score", so students can play multiple times and the scenarios will still be slightly different.These simulation are part of a larger website that provides multiple links for natural disasters.

Type: Educational Game

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Managing Waste Disposal with Landfills and Recycling:

Landfills have a come a long way! Explore modern techniques for managing our environmental impact through responsible waste disposal.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Tutorials

OWL Purdue: MLA Works Cited:

Learn how to create a Works Cited page with this step-by-step guide. A short video walks you through all of the formatting and style choices you need to make for your next source-based paper. It specifically explains what information must be included for the following sources: books, articles, maps, newspapers, websites, and more.

Type: Tutorial

Effective Writing: Organization :

This activity from the Online Tutorial for Effective Writing from Northern Illinois University provides you with a pre-test to identify any weaknesses in understanding how to organize and revise your writing. After reviewing the mini-lesson on the missed items, you will be presented with additional interactive quizzes for each error type. The arrows at the bottom of each mini-lesson will lead you to these quizzes for extra practice and support.

Type: Tutorial

MLA Format and Documentation:

In this tutorial you will learn how to use MLA format and documentation in your academic papers. You will be able to work at your own pace. Also, throughout the tutorial you will receive plenty of examples to model in your paper.

Type: Tutorial

Guide to Grammar and Writing: Principles of Composition:

This is a comprehensive guide that can help students with writing. This resource includes materials that will help students write in different formats, including personal essays, cause/effect papers, essays about literature, and research papers. There are materials that will help students with different aspects of the writing process, including how to develop an introduction or conclusion, how to write a thesis statement, and how to effectively use transitions.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.