Access United States Government    (#7921015)

{ United States Government - 2106310 } Version for Academic Year:

Course Standards

General Course Information and Notes

General Notes

Access Courses: Access courses are intended only for students with a significant cognitive disability. Access courses are designed to provide students with access to the general curriculum. Access points reflect increasing levels of complexity and depth of knowledge aligned with grade-level expectations. The access points included in access courses are intentionally designed to foster high expectations for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Access points in the subject areas of science, social studies, art, dance, physical education, theatre, and health provide tiered access to the general curriculum through three levels of access points (Participatory, Supported, and Independent). Access points in English language arts and mathematics do not contain these tiers, but contain Essential Understandings (or EUs). EUs consist of skills at varying levels of complexity and are a resource when planning for instruction.

English Language Development ELD Standards Special Notes Section:

Teachers are required to provide listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction that allows English language learners (ELL) to communicate information, ideas and concepts for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.  For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support, students will interact with grade level words, expressions, sentences and discourse to process or produce language necessary for academic success. The ELD standard should specify a relevant content area concept or topic of study chosen by curriculum developers and teachers which maximizes an ELL’s need for communication and social skills. To access an ELL supporting document which delineates performance definitions and descriptors, please click on the following link: http://www.cpalms.org/uploads/docs/standards/eld/SS.pdf.

For additional information on the development and implementation of the ELD standards, please contact the Bureau of Student Achievement through Language Acquisition at sala@fldoe.org.

Additional Instructional Resources:
A.V.E. for Success Collection is provided by the Florida Association of School Administrators: http://www.fasa.net/4DCGI/cms/review.html?Action=CMS_Document&DocID=139. Please be aware that these resources have not been reviewed by CPALMS and there may be a charge for the use of some of them in this collection.

General Information

Course Number: 7921015
Course Path:
Abbreviated Title: ACCESS US GOVT
Number of Credits: Course may be taken for up to two credits
Course Length: Multiple (M) - Course length can vary
Course Attributes:
  • Class Size Core Required
Course Type: Core Academic Course
Course Status: Course Approved
Grade Level(s): 9,10,11,12,30,31
Graduation Requirement: United States Government

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this course.

Original Student Tutorials

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Three:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Three of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read more excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will evaluate the effectiveness of his argument's structure. 

Make sure to complete Part One and Part Two before beginning Part Three.

  • Click HERE for Part One.
  • Click HERE for Part Two. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part Two:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part Two of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from Ickes’ speech, and then you will identify his use of rhetorical appeals and analyze the structure of his argument. 

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE for Part One.

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE for Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What Is an American? Evaluating the Structure of an Argument – Part One:

Examine what it means to be an American by analyzing a speech delivered by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, in 1941. This tutorial is Part One of a three-part series. In this tutorial, you will read excerpts from the opening sections of Ickes’ speech. Then, you will work on determining his purpose, point of view, and important claims in these sections.  

Make sure to complete all three parts! Click HERE to view Part Two. Click HERE to view Part Three.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Hallowed Words: Evaluating a Speaker's Effectiveness:

Examine the hallowed words of Abraham Lincoln in this interactive tutorial. You'll examine Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and identify his point of view, reasoning, and evidence in order to evaluate his effectiveness as a speaker.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 2:

Practice literacy skills while learning more about the Pullman Strike of 1894 in this interactive tutorial.

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part 1 where you'll learn the history behind the same event.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Literacy in History: The Pullman Strike, Part 1:

Learn the history behind the Pullman Strike of 1894 in part 1 of this interactive tutorial.  In Part 2, you'll practice your literacy skills while learning more about the same event! 

Click HERE to open part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address:

Examine a famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln, his 2nd Inaugural Address. This speech, given a month before his assassination, is considered by many to be one of his most eloquent and moving speeches. By the end of this tutorial you should be able to determine Lincoln's purpose for his 2nd Inaugural Address, analyze his word choice, and identify his use of parallel structure. Finally, you should be able to put all of these things together to analyze how Lincoln's word choice and use of parallel structure contributed to the purpose for his speech.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Text Resources

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Swift and Co. v. U.S. (1905):

Learn more about the 1905 landmark Supreme Court decision Swift and Co. v. U.S. In this case, the Court considered issues of trusts, business practices, regulations, monopolies, and capitalism in the Gilded Age.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: United States v. E.C. Knight (1895):

Learn more about the 1895 landmark Supreme Court decision U.S. v. E.C. Knight. In this case, the Court considered issues of trusts, business practices, regulations, monopolies, and capitalism in the Gilded Age.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Abrams v. United States (1919):

Learn more about the 1919 landmark Supreme Court decision Abrams v. U.S. In this case, the Court decided issues of free speech during wartime: a group of immigrants and anarchists had criticized American involvement in World War I and urged resistance to the war. The Court's decision produced a famous dissent by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Frontiero v. Richardson (1973):

Learn more about the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision Frontiero v. Richardson. In this case, the Court considered the matter of a female Air Force officer who applied for benefits for her husband--and was denied. The Court's ruling touched on issues of gender and civil rights.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Cases: Grutter v. Bollinger & Gratz v. Bollinger (2003):

Learn more about the 2003 landmark Supreme Court decisions Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger. In these dual cases, the Court upheld the use of affirmative action (as one factor in many) in deciding college admissions.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: U.S. Steel Workers of America v. Weber (1979):

Learn more about the 1979 landmark Supreme Court decision U.S. Steel Workers v. Weber. In this case, the Court upheld a controversial affirmative action policy regarding the training and placement of skilled laborers.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld (2006):

Learn more about the 2006 landmark Supreme Court decision Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. In this case, the Court considered issues of civil rights and the treatment of prisoners of war in the context of the global War on Terror.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Schechter v. U.S. (1935):

Learn more about the 1935 landmark Supreme Court decision Schechter v.U.S. In this Depression-era case, the Court ruled against one of the key parts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal: the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA). Issues of economics, capitalism, and government power were all at stake.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Miranda v. Arizona (1966):

Learn more about the 1966 landmark Supreme Court decision Miranda v. Arizona. In this case, the Court considered the civil rights issues of due process and self-incrimination. The case set an important legal precedent and established the "Miranda Rights" which must be read to criminal defendants upon arrest.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Cooper v. Aaron (1958):

Learn more about the 1958 landmark Supreme Court decision Cooper v. Aaron. In this lesser known follow-up to Brown v. Board of Education, the Court held that states could not pass legislation that undermined the desegregation of public schools.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Lochner v. New York (1905):

Learn more about the 1906 landmark Supreme Court decision Lochner v. New York. In this case, the Supreme Court established an important precedent that would last for decades when it struck down a labor law setting maximum working hours.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Korematsu v. United States (1944):

Learn more about the 1944 landmark Supreme Court decision Korematsu v. U.S. In this case, the Supreme Court considered the issue of domestic internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The Court's ruling remains one of its most controversial decisions ever.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Gideon v. Wainwright (1963):

Learn more about the 1963 landmark Supreme Court decision Gideon v. Wainwright. In this case, the Supreme Court decided issues related to due process and a criminal defendant's right to a lawyer's counsel even if he or she cannot afford one.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Casey v. Planned Parenthood (1992):

Learn more about the 1992 landmark Supreme Court case Casey v. Planned Parenthood. In this case, the Supreme Court affirmed its earlier decision in Roe v. Wade but gave the states increased authority to regulate abortions.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: The Slaughterhouse Cases (1873):

Learn more about the 1873 landmark Supreme Court decision known as The Slaughterhouse Cases. In this case, the Supreme Court defined the limits of the then-new Fourteenth Amendment and its guarantee of equal "privileges and immunities" to citizens.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Roe v. Wade (1973):

Learn more about the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. In this controversial case, the Supreme Court ruled that state laws denying women the right to an abortion were unconstitutional, legalizing abortion in the entire United States.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Plessy v. Ferguson (1896):

Learn more about the 1896 landmark Supreme Court decision Plessy v. Ferguson. In this case, the Supreme Court declared legal "separate but equal" laws requiring black and white citizens to use segregated facilities. The decision ushered in an era of "Jim Crow" in the American South.

Type: Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: United States v. Lopez (1995):

Learn more about the 1995 landmark Supreme Court decision U.S. v. Lopez. In this case, the Supreme Court ruled that Congress could not ban the possession of firearms within "gun-free school zones." The decision touched on issues of gun control, federalism, and the powers of Congress under the Commerce Clause.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

History of the Democratic Party:

Learn about the history of the Democratic Party, the party of Jackson, Wilson, FDR, and LBJ, in this tutorial video by Khan Academy. From its early roots in the era of Thomas Jefferson to the present day, the Democratic Party has played an integral role in shaping the government, policies and history of America.

Type: Tutorial

History of the Republican Party:

Learn about the history of the Republican Party, the party of Lincoln, Hoover, Eisenhower, and Reagan, in this tutorial video by Khan Academy. From its early roots tied to Alexander Hamilton to the present day, the Republican Party has played an integral role in shaping the government, policies and history of America.

Type: Tutorial

Reconstruction and the 15th Amendment:

This short video provided by Khan Academy features two historians reviewing the ratification of the 15th Amendment, which granted African American men the right to vote. The historians also explore ways in which the different Reconstruction Amendments were undermined and not fully realized for almost a century. Helpful graphics illustrate the content.

Type: Tutorial

Majority Rules: Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918):

Learn the historical context for a landmark Supreme Court decision, Hammer v. Dagenhart, in this short interactive tutorial. This case dealt with child labor in the early 20th century. You'll have a chance to evaluate the case on your terms before seeing how the justices actually ruled. Enjoy!

Type: Tutorial

Majority Rules: New York v. United States (1992):

Learn the historical context for a landmark Supreme Court decision, New York v. United States,in this short interactive tutorial. This case dealt with federal laws regarding radioactive waste removal in the late 20th century. You'll have a chance to evaluate the case on your terms before seeing how the justices actually ruled. Enjoy!

Type: Tutorial

The Supreme Court: Brown v. Board of Education:

Learn more about the 1954 landmark Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. This case was a pivotal moment in the struggle for racial equality in America.

Type: Tutorial

Freedom of the Press: New York Times v. United States:

View a documentary about the First Amendment protections of freedom of speech and freedom of the press. You'll review the historic origins of these rights and then go into detail about the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in New York Times v. United States, the Pentagon Papers case. Enjoy!

Type: Tutorial

The Supreme Court: Timeline:

With this interactive timeline, you can explore key cases and events in the history of the Supreme Court, ranging from 1787 to 2005. To learn specifically about cases related to integration, busing, affirmative action, the rights of the accused, and reproductive rights, click on the years 1954, 1963, 1966, and 1973, though ALL the links will lead you to valuable information. Have fun exploring!

Type: Tutorial

Habeas Corpus: The Guantanamo Cases:

In this tutorial, you will view an outstanding video on the meaning and history of habeas corpus: the law that prevents a person being held in jail or prison without being able to hear and contest the charges being brought against them. You'll then learn about 4 recent Supreme Court cases where habeas corpus has been called into question in the context of the global war on terror.

Type: Tutorial

A Conversation on the Constitution: Brown v. Board of Education:

In this video, you will hear from Supreme Court Justices O'Connor, Breyer and Kennedy as they recount the landmark Supreme Court decision on the Brown v. Board of Education case in 1954. This case was instrumental in the advancement of the Civil Rights Movement and to desegregating public schools in America. The video also include discussion of a key event that followed the Brown v. Board ruling, specifically that of the nine students who integrated Little Rock Central High School in 1957, a group known as the Little Rock Nine. Enjoy this conversation on the Constitution!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this course.