LAFS.910.L.3.5Archived Standard

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  1. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
  2. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 910
Strand: Language Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved - Archived
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: TM , EBSR , MS , MC , OR , GR , SHT item(s)
  • Assessed with: LAFS.910.RL.2.4, LAFS.910.L.3.4
  • Assessment Limits :
    Items should not focus on dictionary word meanings but should focus on how the words and phrases function within the context of the passage. Items should focus on words and phrases that have figurative or evocative meanings central to the meaning of the text rather than isolated, incidental vocabulary. Items may ask students to employ various strategies to explore meaning, including the application of context clues, roots, or affixes. Items may require students to make connections between words and to delve into figurative or connotative meanings.
  • Text Types :
    Items assessing these standards may be used with one or more grade-appropriate literary texts. Texts may vary in complexity.
  • Response Mechanisms :
    The Technology-Enhanced Item Descriptions section on pages 3 and 4 provides a list of Response Mechanisms that may be used to assess these standards (excluding the Editing Task Choice and Editing Task item types). The Sample Response Mechanisms may include, but are not limited to, the examples below.
  • Task Demand and Sample Response Mechanisms :

    Task Demand

    Determine the meaning of words or phrases, using context as a clue.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select a word or phrase that provides context for determining the meaning of a word. 

    Multiselect

    • Requires the student to select multiple words or phrases that provide context for determining the meaning of a word. 

    EBSR

    • Requires the student to select a word’s or phrase’s meaning and then to select context clues from the text to support the meaning. 

    Selectable Hot Text

    • Requires the student to select words or phrases from the text that act as context clues when determining another word’s meaning.
    • Requires the student to select the meaning of a word or phrase and then to select context clues from the text to support the meaning.

    Task Demand

    Analyze the impact of word choice on the text’s meaning or tone.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select the correct analysis of how a word or phrase affects the meaning or tone of a text. 

    Open Response

    • Requires the student to explain in one or two sentences the impact of figurative words or phrases on meaning or tone. 

    EBSR

    • Requires the student to select the text’s meaning or tone and then to select words from the text that support that meaning or tone. 

    Open Response

    • Requires the student to explain how the impact of word choice affects the text’s meaning or tone.

    Task Demand

    Identify patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select the correct word that would fit the meaning or part of speech in the text. 

    GRID

    • Requires the student to match patterns of word changes with different meanings or parts of speech.

    Task Demand

    Interpret the meaning of figurative language in context and analyze its role in the text.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Selectable Hot Text

    • Requires the student to select a correct description of the meaning of figurative language and then to select a description of the effect this figurative language has on a larger section of the text. 

    EBSR

    • Requires the student to select a correct description of the meaning of figurative language and then to select a description of the effect this figurative language has on a larger section of the text. 

    GRID

    • Requires the student to match examples of figurative language with their meanings and then to match these examples with the effects they create within the text as a whole.

    Task Demand

    Analyze nuances in meaning of words with similar denotations.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to demonstrate understanding of nuances in word meaning by identifying words that play similar roles or have similar connotative meanings. 

    Selectable Hot Text

    • Requires the student to select words or phrases from the text that show the meaning of words used in the text.

     

    • Requires the student to select words or phrases from the text that provide support for the differential meaning of words with similar denotations.

     

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Learn more about the sample English II CMAP, its features, and its customizability by watching this video:

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please .

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

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Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

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Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including word meanings, subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and emotions connected to specific words. In this interactive tutorial, you will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

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Learn to identify figurative language within poetry, including the use of similes, metaphors, and personification. In this interactive tutorial, we'll analyze William Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and William Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” to discover how figurative language contributes to the meaning of each poem.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including word meanings, subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and emotions connected to specific words. In this interactive tutorial, you will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part One:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Figurative Language in Poetry:

Learn to identify figurative language within poetry, including the use of similes, metaphors, and personification. In this interactive tutorial, we'll analyze William Wordsworth’s “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” and William Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” to discover how figurative language contributes to the meaning of each poem.

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Parent Resources

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