LAFS.7.W.1.3

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
  1. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 7
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1001040: M/J Language Arts 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001050: M/J Language Arts 2 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
1002010: M/J Language Arts 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1006010: M/J Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1007010: M/J Speech and Debate 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1009010: M/J Creative Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1009040: M/J Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1100000: M/J Library Skills/Information Literacy (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7810012: Access M/J Language Arts 2  (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3a: Orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing the narrator and/or characters.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3b: Organize ideas and events so that they unfold naturally.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3c: When appropriate, use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3d: Use a variety of transition words, phrases and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3e: Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3f: Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
LAFS.7.W.1.AP.3g: Use words, phrases or gathered information to accurately reflect literary context.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

O' Oysters! The Opposite of Hero is not a Villain; It's a Bystander!:

Who knew the eldest Oyster could have saved them all? This lesson is the final lesson in a three-lesson series and can be used on its own or as the culmination of a unit using the poem "The Walrus and the Carpenter" by Lewis Carroll. In this final lesson, the poem's lessons are used to introduce an informational text on bullying and the bystander effect. The lesson involves close reading, chunking the text into digestible parts using a graphic organizer, text-dependent questions, and a narrative essay summative assessment.

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A Picture's Worth A Thousand Words: From Image to Detailed Narrative:

This two-day lesson, "A Picture's Worth A Thousand Words: From Image to Detailed Narrative," by Traci Gardner, is provided by ReadWriteThink.org, a website developed by the International Reading Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, with support from the Verizon Foundation.

In the lesson, students view an image that tells a story and brainstorm the possible event or situation the image illustrates. Each student then writes a narrative from the point of view of one of the characters, revealing the character's thoughts/feelings and the events that led up to the image or the events that will follow.

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Close Reading: "For this is an Enchanted Land," an excerpt from Cross Creek:

In this lesson, students will conduct three close readings of an excerpt from Cross Creek by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.

For the first reading, the students will complete a graphic organizer to define select vocabulary words. In the second reading, students will complete another graphic organizer to analyze the types of figurative language used in the story and how they impact the tone and meaning. They will also complete a T-chart comparing and contrasting the sensory details used to describe a before and after of the author's home. In the final reading, students will answer text-based questions about the excerpt. Answer keys for the graphic organizers and text-based questions are included.

The summative assessment, in the form of a narrative/descriptive essay, will require the students to choose a special place of their own and describe it with specific words and figurative language that convey the appropriate tone.

Type: Lesson Plan

Introduction to Middle School Writing: Artifact Bags, Writing Territories, and the Writing Process:

This lesson serves as an introduction to the narrative writing process helping students to brainstorm ideas, produce organized, thoughtful drafts, and understand the writing process. Students will discover their writing territories by creating a list of ideas they will use as a basis for their writing by working with artifact bags (Ziplock bags filled with trinkets, toys, memorabilia, and items students are familiar with and can write about in a writer's workshop). They will also practice each stage of the writing process (brainstorming, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) during writing workshop. Students will receive feedback from peer reviewers at each step of the way as they perfect their writer's craft. Students will produce a final narrative essay for the summative assessment.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Went Wrong: Writing a Prequel to "Harrison Bergeron":

Upon reading Kurt Vonnegut's "Harrison Bergeron", students will write a prequel to the text that focuses on the cause or causes that led to the United States becoming a dystopian society by 2081. The students will use logical sequencing to connect the prequel to the original text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Travel Troubles:

This activity engages the students into time scheduling, budgeting, and decision making to maximize time efficiency.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Literary Analysis of "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" and Narrative Writing Activity:

In this lesson, students will be able to analyze how Rudyard Kipling uses theme and short story elements to create the classic story, "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi." Students will engage in various pre-reading activities to scaffold background knowledge, vocabulary, and ability to identify theme. Working in cooperative groups will allow students to discuss and evaluate their learning in a non-threatening environment. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will write an original narrative using what they learned in this lesson to create their own story.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: Tom Sawyer:

The goal of this one day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they've been practicing on a regular basis to discover the rich humor and moral lesson embedded in Twain's text. By reading and rereading the passage closely, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will explore the problem Tom Sawyer faced and how he "solved" his conundrum. When combined with writing about the passage, students will learn to appreciate how Twain's humor contains a deeper message and derive satisfaction from the struggle to master complex text. At the end of the lesson, students are provided two writing prompts to constructive a narrative inspired by Twain's text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Video/Audio/Animation

The Case Against Good and Bad:

In this animated video from TEDed, students will learn why words like "bad" and "good" are not descriptive and have no place in their writing. They will also be able to choose many other more appropriate and expressive words to improve their writing once they finish the video.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Travel Troubles:

This activity engages the students into time scheduling, budgeting, and decision making to maximize time efficiency.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

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Parent Resources

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